For the look of Relax in a worsted weight yarn, take a look at Worsted Boxy.

FIBER ARTS BOY OF THE YEAR!!

Dear Ann,
I am well aware that there are laws against child labor, and in theory I am very much in favor of these laws, but why can’t David make ME an 8 pound ball of finger knitting?? I had dibbies on the funky rug department of this blog, you know. And you took shameless advantage of your position as his mother, in getting him to part with it.
And the RUG!! What a fab fab rug you are making. It is fab in its own right, but when you consider the PROVENANCE…..I can already hear the docent at the American Folk Art Museum whispering reverently, ‘Now THIS piece is among the earliest in the collaboration of mother-and-son folk ruggers from Tennessee. Please, STEP AWAY FROM THE RUG.’
I need David’s help with our potholder situation up here. We love making potholders until the last quarter or so, when it takes so much brute strength to weave in the last loops. Are the Target loops by any chance stretchier than the fancy schmancy loops I’m getting here?? What is David’s secret? I will be slightly mollified–slightly, I say–if you would do me the honor of sending me a few potholders to experiment with. I think they would make awesome bottoms for bags. If you didn’t finish the loops around the edges, you could just pick up and knit a bag in the round. A bunch of them sewn or crocheted together would make a mighty fine mat or rug, and you could do a Judi Boisson style border using double stranded cotton yarn, again by picking up stitches around the edges.
So many weird home textiles to make, so little time.

2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Dear MDK —
    Can you two get your kids to make something for me? Kay, I know that Carrie and Joseph love me…and Anne, if your kids knew me they would love me too.
    Blog looks great!!

  2. I’m ashamed to admit I taught Carrie to finger-knit this past weekend. There is something addictive about it (are we surprised), so she did quite a lot of it, running through my ziploc of cotton leftovers in nothing flat. She was better at it than I am–I tend to pull it too tight, while she leaves these nice open loops, fairly uniform in size, that give the strand a juicy, springy feel. Carrie is totally on board with the let’s-make-a-rug concept. I’m sure, Lis, that we can arrange an auction when Carrie is ready to sell her output. eBay? (I’m only half kidding?? How educational would THAT be?)