Need a holiday handknit? Time for a Schmatta!

Important Information

Dear Ann,
A couple of vital infos I must share.
For those in and around New York City: the Bust Holiday Craftacular is tomorrow (Sunday, December 12). Goody bags for early birds.
quillowbundles.jpg
(More lovely photos over at The Purl Bee.)
For those with obsessive tendencies, or those who simply are curious about the overpowering yens of others: these blanket kits from Purl have been occupying my every waking thought. I think it’s the combination of overdyed, textured wool fabric, and flat seams. The flat seams are key. (The “quillow” bit? That means nothing to me. I may even save the 10th patch for rug-hooking instead of pillow-fying.) But the flat seams…..in contrasting thread……[holds back of hand to forehead in simulated faint].
Yesterday I found myself musing, on the subway, about whether blanket stitching around the edge by hand would be too Folk Art? Yes? No? Maybe? Seems like it needs an edge. You know how I feel about things needing edges. Fear of unraveling: that has got to be a metaphor for something.
Happy weekend all!
Love,
Kay

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31 Comments

31 Comments

  1. kay … my thoughts exactly … that blanket needs an edging doesn’t it … maybe not buttonhole stitch … but something alabama chanin’ish on the edges don’t you think? … am sure you will figure out something splendid … kiss olive on the nose from us!!!

  2. Saw and loved the Purl blanket. It seemed beautiful, but a bit incomplete. You figured it out-edging. The poor things aren’t done yet. (I always feel like that about vests too-if only they had added sleeves) I am thinking blanket stitch in yarn. It would have to be sturdy yarn. Or maybe VVVV stitching, that would be less expected. The flat seems are breathtaking. Need more Olive soon. Please.

  3. … wait … it just came to me … some needle felting on the edges … that’ll do … one more kiss for olive … on the nose!!!

  4. Some of the colors are sold out already!!!

  5. there is a reason folk-artists have used blanket stitching to finish blankets over the years- it is simple and beautiful. I don’t think it will look too folk-arty- I think it would be perfect.

  6. I already snapped up one of those kits, in black because I am boring (although if ever there was a not boring black, it’s this kit). But the edges – hmmmm. You’re right, it needs an edge. Blanket stitch would be very folk art and perfect, but maybe something entirely unexpected. A ruffle? In silk dupioni? Too much? Maybe just a silk binding? Hand stitched with mitered corners?

  7. Dang, they’ve already sold out of two colorways! That beautiful turquoise group is gone – all the better for my budget, I suppose.

  8. Divine, delicious, and I am a member of the Association For The Advancement of Blanket Stitching The Edges Of Things.
    I don’t think it’s a quillow; it’s a pilt, y’all. Quillow sounds like yet another Palin child.

  9. Great kits, but what has been on my mind are the baby blanket kits from Purl. Love them and just might get one to have “on hand.”

  10. Quillows are dumb; my mom made one once and really, a quilt is just fine. Blanket stitch, okay, but that idea of Lynn’s of a silk binding: parfait!

  11. Go for the blanket stitch! It seems like just the right touch.

  12. Ohhhh those are lovely. If only I knew how to sew!

  13. Simple, smallish running stitch one third inch in from the edge and saskiko motifs on all the plain squares. Edge stitch picks up a darker color in one of the plaids. Sashiko motifs in plant-dyed floss nearly disappears against the color of its background fabric like deer in the late autumn forest. I have to lie down and recover now.

  14. Oh, dear. Those are gorgeous. Somebody buy the last tomato colored set before I do something I’ll regret.

  15. They are indeed gorgeous. I thought about edgings. The blanket stitch is not necessarily folk arty. I thought about and variations of it, thought about a narrowish bias self fabric edge, and really, I do like it as is. In the end if I did one though, it would be blanket stitch. Lotsa help right? Maybe one should make several to test. :)

  16. Blanket stitch would look perfect around the edge. If your sewing machine includes the blanket stitch, you could stitch that edge with a thread with sheen and be done in no time!
    Mary G. in Texas

  17. The quillow bit makes a lovely warm pocket to put your feet in. I like flat seams.

  18. Here I was, sitting here all contented like, and then you have to show me these blanket kits from Purl. And now, I’m filled with longing.
    You are a fiber pusher.

  19. Oh – I love those. I vote for a blanket stitch edge. I think it’ll look lovely. Which colors are you most entranced by? And let me just say it’s a good thing I don’t sew (ahem – yet) or I’d be in trouble.

  20. Another vote for blanket stitch, although sashiko is very tempting. The more folk art you want the look, the fuzzier the string and the more variety in the stitches you need. The more disciplined and smaller the blanket stitches, and the smoother and sweeter the string, the less “folk art” and the more “antique” the effect.

  21. Someone on Ravelry posted this link. I thought you guys would like it. Beautiful story…
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-h7TnO6TBx4

  22. I say ‘no’ to blanket stitch. But then you will probably say ‘no’to me:) To me, blanket stitch needs a hem to give an arc to the long vertical stitch and have the horizontal run sit well. I am making this blanket at the moment for my 18 year old’s birthday, but using a less muted and less expensive felted wool from http://www.etsy.com/listing/63514348/hand-dyed-and-felted-wool-fabric-number. An 18 year old does not need to be mute(d). I have simply used a running stitch of floss around the edge about 1/4″ in and it is simple and, to my eyes, looks well.

  23. Confessing same obsessive project daydreaming upon seeing these sets earler. You know how I’m not about precision so usually quilting gives me the willies but the dyes, the no-need-to-hem and the contrast stitching possibilities…all over it.Definitel contrasty stitching on seams.
    Jury still out on blanket stitch edging.
    (just read the comments, as usual Cristina nailed it).

  24. The dupioni edge suggested up above somewhere sounds fab. Blanket stitch — meh. How about wide grograin ribbon, hand stitched?

  25. OK, you did it. Now I am jonesing to felt the daylights out of some unloved handknits and turn them into blankets!

  26. Well, felt will not unravel, but still, edges are important.
    “Edge treatment,” as they say, even more so, since it sounds like something an art critic would say.
    Blanket stitch, in contrasting thread….. I’m gonna say, not too Folk Art. But you could also take the opportunity to indulge your love of sewing on binding.
    Those piles of fabric are too poignant. Makes me want to style my house with colorized piles.

  27. …I had successfully resisted the blandishments of Purl, but you may have pushed me over the edge with this post.

  28. Yes, I’m a huge Pearl Bee fan too. And the real store is to die for!

  29. I love blanket stitching and I don’t see near enough of it. There is a reason it’s been around as long as it has – it’s perfect.

  30. Blanket stitching – yes. After all, the stitch is actually NAMED for what you want to use it for.

  31. Days late and this still pushed me over the edge. I haven’t sewed since 8th grade. Spring Green blankie, you will be mine!!