Is Starshower the new Honey Cowl? Only time will tell (but it looks good).

Miters of the Corn

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Dear Ann,
When Amber comes over, here’s the script:
“AMBER COMES OVER: A SCENE IN ONE SCENE”
[Amber and Kay embrace while jumping up and down and squealing, you-just-made-the-cheerleading-squad style.]
Amber: Miters!
Kay: Mitersmitersmiters!
[More jumping, now spinning.]
Kay: STRIPES!
Amber: Stripes YES!
[Yarn now tumbling out of plastic bags as jumping slows due to advancing age of one and advancing pregnancy of the other.]
Amber [gasping slightly]: Gees…..
Kay: BEND!!!!!
[Big hug. Fade to snacktime and knitting of loud stripey mitery things.]
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I happened to be in a cornfield yesterday with the latest collaborative blanket Amber and I made for afghans for Afghans. It was the perfect setting for a photo shoot.
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There was even a handsome, not-that-into-modeling model, just like in Martin Storey and Wendy Baker’s new book, Knitting For Him (which has some really great, updated classic designs for men, and one long-haired model who out-Rowans all previous Rowan models in his ability to gaze into the middle distance while appearing unaware of his astonishing beauty). (Seriously, this book is a great find, despite dear Martin’s introduction in which he suggests that most of the knitting for men is done by their “womenfolk”. Which may be true. But still. Womenfolk? But I digress. Back to cornfield.)
cornblanketdetail.jpg
The blanket was ready for its closeup. Note the marling of the yarns. We knit with 2 strands of mostly-heathered Cascade 220 shades. It is against the Book of Amber & Kay for both strands to be the same shade. (No no NO! Can’t have THAT.) Each miter started with 120 stitches. For this blanket Kay used Size 11s and Amber used Size 13s, but we can’t really recommend that big of a gauge. Our first blanket was a bit nicer, gauge-wise, with Amber on the US 11s and Kay on the US 10s. (Proving that loose knitters and medium-tight knitters can live together in peace and harmony.) We joined our miters together, picked up and knit garter stitch borders (4 ridges), put teeny miters in the corners, and then finished it off with an applied i-cord edge.
Applied I-Cord is my new boyfriend; I do not know how I lived without Applied I-Cord.
Cornfield As Entertainment
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Joseph and I took the blanket on a tractor/wagon ride through a cornfield in Water Mill, New York.
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This was a multi-media extravaganza. Have you been on one of these? Have they come to Nashville yet?
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Snow White! (The seven dwarfs were there, but too short to be in the picture.)
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Candy corn! Get it?
Big fun.
Love, Kay

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22 Comments

22 Comments

  1. Hey, we need to see the whole thing! Miters and stripes all in one blanket?
    And was the corn in a maze? We once went through a maize maze in England. Amazing, I know.

  2. Two strands? You knit two of the Cascade 220 together with a size 10? BTW, it looks great.

  3. Joseph definitely has a future as a high priced Rowan model. Love the way he picked the crocs to co-ordinate with the blanket. He’s a pro!

  4. Lovely warm blankie. I am fond of knitting with two strands together myself — makes a mighty warm sweater for some child in Mongolia or Afghanistan.
    I think “womenfolk” goes nicely with “cornfield”, don’t you? Just sayin’…

  5. Awesome yarn pOrn…love the heather!

  6. Beautiful blankets – love the blankets. Just thumbed through Martin Storey’s book and that was my thought exactly about the models – what do you think of Kaffe’s new book? I wasn’t going to buy it (since I have all the old ones and the pattern library) but I did!!!!! Love that gridlock pattern – of course am weak with admiration for Charleston in the background!

  7. The blanket, the cornfield, the model– gorgeous stuff. And now I’ll forever think of corn mazes as “maize mazes”. Perfect.

  8. oh, yeah::
    gaze into the middle distance while appearing unaware of his astonishing beauty
    the blanket is gorgeous… perfect.

  9. Dude – you seriously went ALL OUT with the finishing. Applied i-cord border?
    But, uh, correction, I used size 15s. FIFTEENS. Which I think I left at your place, actually. From the Denise set. I’ll have to waddle up west to pick them up sometime soon while I still can!
    Funny how you think the gauge of the last was better – I was thinking how great it was that I had to match your gauge and learned a great lesson in squish attained by knitting at large gauge and that naturally, it did not ruin the knitting, but actually made it a little… squishier. In a rilly good way.

  10. Are those pumpkins on the ground ? In the cornfield? Fantastic blanket, can we see it opened out and spread flat in all its glory, please.

  11. ‘womenfolk’?? seriously???

  12. cornfield……handknits……womenfolk…..pregnancy…..please tell me you were wearing shoes!!!
    But really, if womenfolk never made such gorgeous, thoughtful, from the heart knitting, then who would?

  13. The menfolk here thought the Rowan models were hilarious. Also in need of a haircut.

  14. Looks great! and your corn is so much greener than around here – they are already harvesting it (Indiana).

  15. Awesome.. looks great for snuggling… and someone will appreciate it so much! However, it’s still HOT.. where I live- can’t imagine having a blanket on me right now- but, I’m sure that will change in a few weeks- maybe even w/in one week? (I’m still wearing capri pants and sandals)
    I made some hats to send over to Afghanistan.
    Mostly, I’m just in awe.. that you knitted a blankie.. with that ‘amount of knitting’ without poking your eyes out w/ the sharp pointed sticks.. (that we ‘womenfolk’ would call knitting needles) I’m inspired.

  16. Awesome.. looks great for snuggling… and someone will appreciate it so much! However, it’s still HOT.. where I live- can’t imagine having a blanket on me right now- but, I’m sure that will change in a few weeks- maybe even w/in one week? (I’m still wearing capri pants and sandals)
    I made some hats to send over to Afghanistan.
    Mostly, I’m just in awe.. that you knitted a blankie.. with that ‘amount of knitting’ without poking your eyes out w/ the sharp pointed sticks.. (that we ‘womenfolk’ would call knitting needles) I’m inspired.

  17. The double post is apparently.. because I’m so far away? You know that ‘echo sound’ that you sometimes get on International calls? Well, maybe it affects the ‘Internet’ too?
    Hey, it could.. :D
    Oh and do please, purty please.. check out my less than one week old new blog. :D *I fought it as long as I could.. I now am part of the masses.
    http://www.iwouldratherbeknitting.blogspot.com (I hope that’s the correct address.)

  18. Get that boy to an agent – he has the gift! And the blanket is gorgeous too : )
    ps: I’m a big fan of folk-y type words – makes me remember that we’re all a little less techy than we’d like to believe we are.

  19. Hmmmmm. Can we have a pattern for the big-miter blanket? (I love it!)

  20. This beautiful mitery blanket is fabu! So ya’ll used two strands held together (rock on with the big needles) and what did the finished size come to? How many hanks…skeins, whatever…of the 220 did ya’ll end up using?
    Enquiring minds want to know.

  21. Do you remember those TV commercials from some time in the 80’s for the Enquirer? “Enquiring minds want to know!”

  22. Water Mill, sigh. My mom grew up in Wainscott; you’re making me nostalgic. There are no lack of cornfields here in Indiana, but we are short on fresh clams…