Is Starshower the new Honey Cowl? Only time will tell (but it looks good).

The Quality of Flatness Is Not Strained

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Dear Ann,
Over the Memorial Day weekend, I encountered a piece of knitting that was in such deep trouble that the theme song from “COPS” came into my head, unbidden. “Bad boys bad boys, whatcha gonna do? Whatcha gonna do when they come for you?”
The Bad Boy In Question
Background: A couple of years ago, Diana’s friend, whom we shall refer to as “LB”, started a log cabin blanket inspired by Joseph’s Blankie of Many Colors in our first book. LB had recently returned to knitting after a long hiatus. She had been awakened from her slumber by the mere sight of Noro Silk Garden in a luscious colorway of reds/pinks/greens/browns for which I do not have the shade number. She had the idea of making a log cabin blanket using many skeins of this single colorway. She had some concerns about taking up a large project after such a long vacay from knitting. She asked me whether I thought she could handle it.
I based my advice on the following facts, which are not in dispute: At the relevant time, LB could cast on. She could perform the knit stitch, all day long if need be. She could bind off.
Accordingly, I advised LB that I thought a large log cabin blanket was well within her range. It is possible that I may have used the colloquialism, “standing on your head.” I will admit that I was encouraging and reassuring. It is fair to say that I “egged her on”.
So LB worked on this blanket for many months as her exclusive project in the limited knitting time available to her.
Then somebody noticed something. (Ruh roh.)
Diana brought the blanket to me last weekend, for analysis and treatment. (Dum de dump dump.)
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Do you see the issue? Hint: look at the bound-off edge at the top of the picture. That curve is not a trick of photo styling. It was hard to take a picture that showed the extent of the problem. In essence, the blanket was not in the traditional, 2-dimensional, that is to say, FLAT, shape. Each log cabin strip had been bound off, neatly and properly, but to a much tighter gauge than the knitting of the strip itself. The repetition of these tight bind-offs led to an effect on the shape of the blanket that can most charitably be described as “sculptural”.
It was shaped like a bucket.
Now, Ann. When cuddling in a handknit blanket, there is much for the conoisseur to notice and appreciate. There is the softness, there is the drenchy color, there is the cozy warmth evoking memories of one’s time in the cradle, and in the case of a Noro blanket, there are mysterious little bumps of fluff to wonder about. But do you ever think to remark upon or praise the one indispensable quality of a blanket: flatness? No, you do not. You take flatness totally for granted. You walk all over flatness.
Until it’s gone. A non-flat blanket is a sad, unfoldable thing. I did not quite know what to do about the situation. How to fix the problem without breaking the spirit of a knitter newly returned to the coven.
Here’s what I did. Judge me if you will. I was faced with a Situation, and I did the best I could.
I ripped it.
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It took about an hour, no kidding. Just to rip out all those tight bind offs. The flurf fairly flew. I wound and wound.
But the Senior Knitter’s Canons of Professional Responsibility were clear on what I had to do next: make it right. I had to knit those 8-plus skeins back where they belonged. If I sent LB back a nasty plastic bag of kinked-up yarn, a knitting career would be cut down in the bud, the victim of hopelessness and futility. There was garter stitch to be done, and I was just the knitter, in just the frame of mind, to do it.
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(Note the flatness.)
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(I hate to brag, but, you know: pretty dang flat.)
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(Just sayin’.)
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(Tip for newby log-cabinners: lay your project down frequently for a Flatness Check. If it is not utterly flat, take action to flattify. Take time to save time!)
According to Ravelry, there have been hundreds of log cabin blankets knitted according to our “bind off & pick up” method. I thought it was pretty foolproof, but this tight bind-off issue is so obviously a possiblity–I can’t believe we didn’t see it coming, and I also can’t believe that we haven’t heard from other knitters who had the same issue, and would like to wring our pretty necks.
There is a solution! Of course, one could just BIND OFF LOOSER, but asking a tight binder-offer to loosen up is just going to make them nervous and tense and they’ll probably bind off even tighter. A bind-off can be made looser simply by binding off this way:
*Knit 2, pass first stitch on the right needle over the second stitch on the right needle, transfer remaining stitch to the left needle; repeat from * until all stitches have been bound off.
This should loosen things up, although it will change the appearance of the edge slightly. Another solution to LB’s problem would be to avoid binding off the strips altogether, by just leaving them on holders or spare circular needles until one worked one’s way around to that strip again. This is a method some knitters use to work log cabin patterns, particularly if they hate binding off. Since I don’t hate binding off, but do hate having to devote 4 circular needles to a single project, I go with the bind-off method. Having 3 of the 4 edges bound off while you are working also makes the project much more portable. But if you’ve got a tight bind-off causing Failure of Flatness, it’s time to regroup and rethink.
I am having fun getting LB’s blanket back to where she left it. Knitting a ton of garter stitch is not.a.problem.
Love,
Kay
P.S. I shoulda known somebody would ask about the quilt. Here ya go.. Yes. My name is Kay, and I am a catalog quiltaholic. Catalog quilts on sale? No resistance.

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94 Comments

94 Comments

  1. Kay, you are an absolute sweetheart! I understand about Senior Knitter Responsibility. You rock.

  2. It’s looking great… ah the teacher’s dilemma, when to fix, when to teach… you have managed both! Well done!

  3. That is so pretty! and your are so nice!

  4. I totally remember that theme song. We haven’t had tv for four year, so geez, what a flashback!

  5. Sage knitting advice, as always.
    And I’m really glad to see you back. I’ve been sending a lot of positive energy your way lately — and did some charity knitting in your/Peter’s honor for a local premie/baby hats organization.

  6. You are a faithful friend to LB. I, too, suffer from fix-itis. It’s especially hard to look at beautiful yarn that has scoliosis when it CAN be put right again. Maybe you want to return the project to LB with an additional Really Big Needle with which to bind off? Or a pitcher of margaritas so she can relax her bind off that way, ha.

  7. Well done, Kay!
    Now can we talk about that fabulous (and flat) quilt?

  8. Senior Knitter’s Canon of Professional Responsibility, huh? I need to get a copy of that I think. So great that now LB will remain in the fold.
    I love, love that quilt. Clean, simple lines. So beautiful.

  9. Oh man. That quilt, on sale, in stock and ready to ship, who cares if there’s no gift box. I fell right off the recovering quiltaholic wagon.

  10. Another plus to not binding off, less stitches to pick up! Also, I just put the stitches on a stray piece of yarn so I’m not using up stitch holders or extra needles.

  11. You are a good woman, and you have clearly saved the knitting status of this particular knitter. Thanks for taking the hit for the good of the clan ;)

  12. As a Less-Than Expert Knitter myself, please forgive if this question is silly, but does binding off with a needle several sizes larger not help with this issue?

  13. Beth,
    Binding off with a larger needle is certainly worth trying, but it seems not to work every time. So many reasons for tight knitting (or binding off).
    Kay

  14. Well, isn’t it lovely! Although the first version would have made a pretty nifty superhero cape, if I do say so…

  15. Well, isn’t it lovely! Although the first version would have made a pretty nifty superhero cape, if I do say so…

  16. What a great friend – and project!! You both deserve deep bows!
    xxooph

  17. It’s like, how much more flat could it be? And the answer is none. None more flat.
    Is that an armadillo under that quilt? Handsome.

  18. That was so sweet of you, Kay — I suspect I would have only given advice! And I must admit that I, too, am a catalog quiltaholic….

  19. So, does LB know that you are reknitting her blanket? If not, are you gonna tell her, or just tell her you “blocked it real good” and teach her how to bind off loosely?
    You are a dear to help a friend. And I bet it was a healing kind of help for you to give, and something simple to focus on.
    If only everything could be fixed with a quick do-over.

  20. Beautiful Log Cabin! What a dear friend to reknit that whole thing!

  21. Well, Kim, if LB didn’t know before, she knows nooooww! :)
    What a great project, she chose! It seems that the geometric/log cabin designs always capture my imagination…and then, too: Noro. What, (outside of tight bind-offs) could be bad?
    And, KAY, love, love, love the way you wrote this. Reading it, I was just smiling more and more (except when I laughed my head off over the “shaped like a bucket” line–perfect timing…).
    Great weekend to All. Knit on!
    LoveDiane

  22. Nigella’s been watching Spinal Tap!!!!!!!!!!!
    Way to Special Ops Commando Strike Force this problem. Lock n load: we’re goin IN.

  23. Almost forgot:
    Are folks getting ready for World Wide Knit in Public Day? I Googled the website, and it seems that it’s going to be for more than one day (spans two weekends). My group is observing the June 13th day. We’ll be sitting on the porch of the local historical society knitting our little hearts out.
    Since the core group of us will be there for most of the day, we’re making ourselves a pot luck lunch, and all. People can also go inside to see the quilt we made in honor of the Hudson River’s quadricentennial.
    Knitters of the world: unite! Go public! Have Funnnn!
    LoveDiane
    P.S.–For fabriholics in, or traveling near, the New Jersey area, five words for you: Acme Country Fabrics–Google it. (Their website boasts 10000 bolts of cotton fabric).

  24. you are a peach, a friend, and a doctor of knitting, to solve this age-old problem of too tight bind offs. merci, merci! i just love flat!

  25. A friend in need, makes you a friend indeed! I just love the Noro, been trying to find someone for whom I haven’t knit the 2X@ scarf so I can make another — hot here in SC.
    I am a tight binder offer — must concentrate to get it loose; and who ever said that a bigger needle is not always the answer is right on. So I am going to try the Knit 2 method, thanks for that advise. Hugs and good thoughts to you.

  26. A friend in need, makes you a friend indeed! I just love the Noro, been trying to find someone for whom I haven’t knit the 2X@ scarf so I can make another — hot here in SC.
    I am a tight binder offer — must concentrate to get it loose; and who ever said that a bigger needle is not always the answer is right on. So I am going to try the Knit 2 method, thanks for that advise. Hugs and good thoughts to you.

  27. So very responsible of you;)

  28. Flatify? Flatify? teehee!
    What a cool word!
    Glad to see you back!
    (((hugs)))

  29. Well, the noro “sculpture” was kinda nice, but the noro “joe’s coat” is going to be beautiful. Be prepared for LB to tell you to just keep gartering away.

  30. Knit On Kay! Failure of Flatness is yet one more thing from this blog that I will never forget. (Ann I currently have a nest of baby robins on my deck lurching around like “bad animation.”)

  31. First I ever heard of leaving the stitches live on another needle. What a cool idea! And with my big Denise set, no prob whatsoever!!!! KEWLLLLLLLLLL!!
    Thank you thank you thank you from hot rainy Bangkok where the 3-hr (on a GOOD day) bus commute offers uninterrupted KNITTING TIME!!!

  32. Every new knitter needs a ‘knitting fairy’. Kay, she found a darn good one in you.

  33. It looks like Noro Silk Garden #84.
    My name is Pammie and I’m a Noro Ho.
    I think I’m a tight binder-offer. I usually go up a knittle size or two. It helps.
    Thanx for showing knit surgery in action! Some of us just love to see disaster averted or corrected. Sick, huh?

  34. I am thankful to read your delightful posts again. I’m sitting at my computer with a broad grin on my face as I read. (My 19 year old son is looking askance at me!) I started a log cabin prayer shawl for a friend – changed my mind – and used it for a baby blanket for my granddaughter to wrap her baby.

  35. Oh my heavens you are the nicest person in the world. All the repetition should put you in a nice, alpha state. Knit on.

  36. Oh, yeah, that’s the stuff. Sometimes the steady flow of garter stitch is the perfect accompaniment. I think I will cast on tomorrow. I can feel the warm, helpful, encouragement from what you have knit.

  37. What an act of love! Another suggestion is to use the next larger size of needle for binding off (I often use this method).

  38. I used the silk garden for a mitred square throw. I am here to say it is one of the most lavish things I have ever knitted. I did a crochet edge to give it a good pop. Gave to sick friend and she loves it.

  39. I am sadly familiar with the bucket problem. I just finished a log cabin baby blanket for a friend yesterday, laid it out only to find it kind of “humped” in the middle (Can one say that in polite company ?)
    But folks, it’s a BABY blanket. Time is a pressin’ – these boys (twins) are bigger than average at 28 weeks so we’re not expecting them to hang in there for too much longer. So never mind ripping it – I blocked the sucker. HARD. With steam. And now it’s flat ……with a sort of curvy edge. But what the heck, they’re babies, they won’t care !

  40. wow Kay, knitting therapy (for you and the blanket). It is going to be beautiful. Hope to see you popping back in again soon

  41. good to see you again, Kay. we’ve missed you.

  42. I love the verb, “flattify”!

  43. Just sitting here thinking about a Noro Silk Garden Log Cabin. Mmm, the colors, that silk-wool smell, the flurfiness. (I can’t decide which newly-coined word I like bettter: “flurf” or “flattify.”) You’re an angel for reknitting the entire lovely project! Although I do know how you love a garter-stitch square. :)

  44. “take action to flattify” has been added to my “invaluable expert knitting tips” card catalog.
    I love the Kay- and Ann-isms! They have saved many of my nerves as I plow through my knitting life.
    Good to see you and loving your imagery!
    Jodie

  45. I strongly recommend binding off rather than using holders, for stability. Hate it when blankets get all stretched out and flabby! Kay, you are our own dear crazy lady — that is a whole LOT of remedial garter stitch. Note to new log cabinners — check out flatness score occasionally as your blanket grows. Now I want to go make another Noro square. . .

  46. Kay! I’ve been thinking about you!
    I love the long straight rows of garter stitch next to the long straight rows of quilting. And I also am a fan of much garter stitching as a calming soothing activity. Back to the tricky patterns later…today it’s the garter stitch!
    I’ve missed you and I’m sending good thoughts and prayers your way.

  47. How sweet of you! It reminded me of having done it when my girls were little and left their knitting overnight with dropped stitches, holes, wavy edges–I would re-knit, and they awoke to see that “it didn’t look as bad as I thought”–proves how important confidence is to success. You are a Knitting Angel, and the Knitting Gods must be mightily pleased.

  48. i like it. i like its raspberriness and its cassisness, i like its regularity and its variety. garter stitch log cabins:: win again!! xo

  49. As the veteran of 3 log cabin blankets, well in the middle of my 4th, I couldn’t agree more with Elizabeth D, especially if your blanket is going to be big and if the fiber of your choice is in the midweight to heavy weight range (my Harrisville shetland log cabin is a mere feather compared to her sister blankets). Logs need to be not only flat, but somewhat straight, too. The regularly spaced bind-offs keep them from turning into undulating waves. Besides,I’d go out of my mind without the positive reinforcement of that bind-off row every 9 ridges.
    I also *love* the look of the bind-off rows on the wrong side: the hand-crafted flip side of flatness.

  50. I’m sure this has been mentioned already, but I tend to bind off really tightly so I go up MANY MANY needles sizes to bind off (especially for something like the border of an afghan) – I’ll go from an 8 to 15 for the bind off (and use the method you suggested). The thing I always have to do is resist the urge to pull the stitches tight as you bind off. Once the whole bind off is finished, you can give it a tug and it will be just find if it’s a little loose.

  51. I’m sure this has been mentioned already, but I tend to bind off really tightly so I go up MANY MANY needles sizes to bind off (especially for something like the border of an afghan) – I’ll go from an 8 to 15 for the bind off (and use the method you suggested). The thing I always have to do is resist the urge to pull the stitches tight as you bind off. Once the whole bind off is finished, you can give it a tug and it will be just find if it’s a little loose.

  52. I’m sure this has been mentioned already, but I tend to bind off really tightly so I go up MANY MANY needles sizes to bind off (especially for something like the border of an afghan) – I’ll go from an 8 to 15 for the bind off (and use the method you suggested). The thing I always have to do is resist the urge to pull the stitches tight as you bind off. Once the whole bind off is finished, you can give it a tug and it will be just find if it’s a little loose.

  53. I’m sure this has been mentioned already, but I tend to bind off really tightly so I go up MANY MANY needles sizes to bind off (especially for something like the border of an afghan) – I’ll go from an 8 to 15 for the bind off (and use the method you suggested). The thing I always have to do is resist the urge to pull the stitches tight as you bind off. Once the whole bind off is finished, you can give it a tug and it will be just find if it’s a little loose.

  54. tour jours gai
    tour jours gai
    kay
    tours jours gai

  55. Ah, yes – to flatify! Good for log cabin knitting, quilts and rugs. A beeeyoutiful word, that. And, you rock for righting all wrongs for a re-newed knitter.

  56. It good to have you back in blogland. We’ve missed you!
    Linda

  57. when I am in doubt of my loose casting off abilities, I pick up a larger needle, usually 2 or 3 sizes bigger, so if I’m tight with that, it will end up at the desired tension. :)

  58. What a perfect catharsis piece! It is an outpouring of love to rip and re-knit for someone else, but such a drudge to have to do it for yourself (sorry Ann, if you ripp’d out to do all of those yarn overs, only to knit again.) I kept waiting for the crossover talk that would bring in the quilt, I had envisioned that one piece had inspired the other piece.

  59. Dear Kay,
    So good to see you blogging again. My thoughts and prayers have been with you and your family. I have really missed you. You are such a dear friend to help out a sista’ knitter. Great job!

  60. You are incredible! Pictured blanket is lovely, and I know she will love it–and you. I just finished a log cabin blanket in Cotton Classic– 17 colors. I started it in 2006 with a different colored center square because I couldn’t wait to start and then found myself needing a border color to tie all the colors together–grey-beige worked beautifully). Obviously, I knit quite a number of things in between starting the blanket and finishing it! My blanket looks wonderful, and measures (flatly!) about 47 x 47. Your directions were VERY clear.
    So glad you are back. Have been praying for you.

  61. That is one flat blanket my friend!
    Knit on!

  62. Kay-so glad you are back !
    I have missed your wonderful and intelligent sense of humor
    I have loved the Log Cabin blankie of yours and Ann’s but I am a wee bit skittish of trying it.
    I had a feeling it was trickier than it looks.
    That beautiful pinky colorway has me reconsidering…

  63. You are amazing Kay. I had a log cabin blanket going that turned into a giant pillow because I hated the binding off/picking up slog once it started getting bigger. Maybe I will try the many-needles method.
    And I totally thought you made that quilt, it has a Denyse Schmidt feel to it that I’ve seen you do before.

  64. I’m a very tight knitter and have always had a problem with tight bind-offs. So I use a needle that’s 1-2 sized larger to bind off with. (I.e., if I’m stitching a warshrag w/ size 8 needles, I bind off with size 9 or 10, depending on how tight I seem to be knitting.) Works for me…

  65. By the way, that blankie has always totally been my favorite Noro colorway of all time. It just looks delicious. That little green moment in there. Yummie.

  66. I love the alchemy of felting, so when I read “Noro…big bucket” I thought, “maybe she could felt it and have a great big knitting basket!”
    Also, “The Unbearable Flatness of Blanketing?”

  67. Check for flatness.. who’d’a thunk it!?? hm!

  68. I forgot to mention, I love my log cabin blanket! You and Ann are a total inspiration to me.
    I’m going to echo the recommendation to keep the bind off instead of using holders; blankets need a bit of stability or they’re just a stretchy mess.
    I did just learn a great bind off in a class with Lily Chin at TKGA: it’s a crochet bind off. All the moves are the same as a regular bind off, but it doesn’t get pulled as much. This might make it better for tight bind-offers. Also, you can choose a larger crochet hook than the needle size. See the “single crochet bind off” video here: http://www.knittinghelp.com/videos/casting-off
    Hugs!

  69. The Flatness is amazing. GOOD JOB! And what a good measure of love and compassion.
    You rock, Kay!
    KT in Redmond, formerly KT in GF

  70. I always use a needle two sizes larger to bind off. I also cast on with a needle two sizes larger. Has worked well for five years.

  71. Kay, you are truly the queen of flat.
    This gives me the opportunity to unleash a quote from a quilting mentor, one I’ve always wanted to repeat. Excuse me while I write a way long comment.
    I used to join Willia Ette Graham of Oakland alongside her quilting frame, to put in some stitches and bask in her wisdom. Her particular specialty was making things flat, including things that were formerly not flat. The collector Eli Leon would give her quilts he bought from other quilters – wonderfully wonky quilts. In many cases, so wonky they were experiments in topography. Mrs. Graham would then re-structure them and beat them into rectangular, level shape. Once in a while this required major surgery and resulted in an entirely new design element.
    Point being, Mrs Graham had a keen eye for flatness. She never failed to praise the flatness of my quilt tops. One day we were having a look at items from Eli’s collection, and she scowled at a quilt whose over-large strips were all bowing in toward the over-large central square, causing haywire ripples along the edges, and she said, “I don’t care if you cut a piece the size of Oakland, you gotta sew it FLAT.”

  72. P.S. Where’s the love (1) button on this thing?
    (oh, right, I’m not on Ravelry…..)

  73. I teach my tight knitting students to go up two needle sizes before binding off. That does the trick every time. You don’t even have to think about binding off loosely.
    Carolyn in NC

  74. Kay, what a true friend you are!! Beautiful blanket. LB could have had a beautiful felted basket too….but that was not the project at hand, I know!! Glad to see you back on the interwebs.

  75. LB speaks up.
    Dear Kay: You are a Goddess! Words cannot express the overwhelming joy that I feel knowing that my blank(ie) is in your hands. And yes, you should ABSOLUTELY keep knitting and finish the darned thing! PLEASE???? I’m the type of knitter who should never venture beyond your dishrags, which I abolutely love and can kind-of do.
    Now, for a little clarification. I began the blanket about 2 1/2 years ago, in Florida, on a family vacation. I had emailed you for advice, and you were very kind and reassuring. And you even picked my dye lots for me. (84 & 284 – 8 of one; 4 of the other) They were on sale at my favorite knitting store, Sakonnet Purls, in Tiverton Four Corners! (and if you’re in the area, go to the Wednesday, June 3, Zoning Board meeting so we can save that fabulous store!) Back to the story.
    When I began knitting, I was drinking wine and reading the directions. I got a little confused. We then went to visit my fabulous in-laws where my mother-in-law (hereinafter Estelle) took one look at what I had done, and sweetly suggested that I start over. She figured out how to do by, of course, reading the very clear instructions and made a sample out of her own yarn. She taught me, and I began to work.
    About 11 months later (now December, ’07), my friend Dana came to visit, and noticed the flatness issue. She tried to stretch out, flatten it out, and finally told me the honest truth. You will have to rip this out. I wouldn’t hear of it. I took it to Estelle over the holidays, and over a brimming glass of wine, she told me that I would absolutely need to rip. She told me how much(not as far down as Kay had to rip) and then she blocked it for me and told me to be very careful and bind off much looser than I had been doing. As you can see, it’s not like I hadn’t been warned. But then I returned to my old ways.
    Now, to be perfectly honest because I know I can’t really be helped unless I come clean, I knit like a few rows at my book group (once/month), a few rows at my daughter’s gymnastics or dance class, and a few rows when I’m hanging out at Diana’s drinking. But I love to knit when I’m doing it. So, I knit and knit and knit all year, and brought it to Estelle again at Thanksgiving. This time she said: “These are certainly beautiful colors.” And that was all.
    And on her most recent visit, she again told me the truth with Diana as her witness, and both Diana & Estelle commanded me to stop knitting. The only solution was Kay. And here we are. One final correction, and perhaps I did lie to Kay about this. I had never been a knitter, ever. I did make 2 dishrags, ala Kay, because I couldn’t steal anymore from Diana, and then decided I was ready for an afghan. Hubris, I know! I’m now chastened. Back to only the smallest of projects for me. Kay is my hero for now and forever.
    I remain, knittingly yours and still in the coven, LB

  76. You, Kay, are a trooper. It would have been tempting for me to say, “ummm. I think you gotta start over…”
    Very tempting.
    Of course, I would be forfeiting all kinds of sainthood points.

  77. Thank you. I need to knit a charity baby blanket and you came along at just the right time to remind me of the log cabin!!! One of my favorites!! And I will flatify it!!!

  78. Ah, the anti-heroine of our story speaks at last! Good on you, LB, for filling in the details– it reminds me of an epic tale: the spark of creative fire (your common dishrag) flames out of control into ambition (a mighty quilt). Anti-heroine seeks advice from elders, and is admonished (nay, multiple times) with the Truth: To Rip is To Heal. Anti-heroine ignores advice at her own peril (so typical). The quilt-bucket grows into an unrecognizable being with a life of it’s own…until finally the wisdom of the village healer (Warshrag Queen) is sought out, in desperation. She takes the misshapen quilt-child into her lair, performs magical (surgical) rites, and Lo! The Quilt is transformed! A Tale of Healing ensues! And all is well, all will be well.
    Love you Kay (W. Q.), good to have you back here.

  79. Been there, done that – didn’t rip. I gave it to the reciepient and told them they could use it to cover the baby in his car seat.

  80. That is some hard core fixing going on. But, gorgeous! Yeah, that’s just what I needed. Another excuse to buy piles of Silk Garden…

  81. I’m one of the ones where the two needle sizes up doesn’t really work. Always thought that and then read a very cogent explanation of why it might not. I have to use the “twice done” method that Kay described.
    This post made me think about doing what has been tempting me for a month. My 11-yr-old protegee has 27 stitches too many on her prayer shawl. I want to rip it back and re-do so she has a hope of ever finishing it. If she sees no need, of course I won’t.

  82. I’ve just discovered your website after reading about you in The Knitter. Help me, I like it – the blog I mean. I don’t read popular blogs. I love the bucket shaped blanket – why not leave it as a soft comfy sculpture? I’d like to knit one in Noro Blossom.

  83. Welcome back! And what an entrance!

  84. Hmmm, I’ve just read LB’s account of things in the comments and a common denominator pops up–glasses of wine while knitting.

  85. Welcome back, Kay!
    I must say, that quilt looks far better in your pics than on the site’s. And I think you should ask for a commission on future purchases from C&B by your readers.

  86. Welcome back, Kay!
    I must say, that quilt looks far better in your pics than on the site’s. And I think you should ask for a commission on future purchases from C&B by your readers.

  87. As we would say in Tassie – “way to go Kay – you are a machine” – trust me, this is a true compliment.

  88. welcome back to one of the mason dixon gals
    peace&blessings

  89. It is a gorgeous log cabin blanket and an equally gorgeous quilt in the background!

  90. You and Mr. Noro have taken garter stitch to perfection! I”m inspired to knit one for AFA.

  91. Fantastic piece of work. A true testament to the power of knitting, ribbing and garter stitch!

  92. You’re a good and kind teacher. The daunting task of ripping and restarting would have probably killed her enthusiasm for knitting had she done it herself. I just hope all your friends and readers don’t start sending you their projects to fix.

  93. hey mary j! yes:: the Epic Blanket Story– one where we all recognize ourselves. It’s all i can do not to drive over the border to Richford and clean the LaRivière House shop out of her Noro stock. Oy, my credit card.

  94. You deserve some kind of bloggers’ award for having gone above and beyond! I am humbled, and a little bit ashamed.