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Stuck

tweedysquares16.jpg
Dear Kay,
I really need some advice. It’s like I’m paralyzed with indecision. No, it’s not like I’m paralyzed; I AM paralyzed. I can barely move my fingers to type this. I Do Not Know What To Do.
The good, great news is that I have crossed Finish Line 1 (knitting the squares of this blanket), Finish Line 2 (sewing the squares together), and FInish Line 3 (sewing in all the ends). My euphoria at hitting these marks was such that I ran around the house in a TIZZY, eager to start Finish Line 4 (adding the border).
I dug out a size 6, 32″ circular and all my orange yarns. I have five oranges on hand, which is really sort of sick if you stop to think about why somebody would have five orange tweed yarns at one time–but let’s not dwell on that, OK?
My plan, based on your excellent advice that a stockinette blanket cannot survive without a garter-stitch border, was to crank each side of border using a different orange yarn for each side. I dove in with my Rowan Rowanspun DK, a very weird little yarn if you ask me, what with its felted texture and tendency to break. But such a great orange.
Anyway–here’s the paralyzing part. I’ve worked ten rows of garter stitch, and I do not know when I should stop. Here are some pix to show you what I’ve got going:
tweedysquares15.jpg
tweedysquares17.jpg
My fear is that if I go too long with the orange border, it will overwhelm the blanket. It’s hard to see in these pix, but the orange in the squares is pretty low-dose. If I orange out much beyond the ten rows I’ve done, won’t it look too orangey once I get all four sides done?
On the other hand, if I go another ten rows, maybe having a LOT of orange will frame the blanket in an attractive and pleasing way. You know, make a commitment to orange. Go all out on the orange.
On the third hand (which I frankly wish I had if it would make this border-knitting go any faster), maybe the orange border should be even narrower than it already is. But I’m not sure it would provide much stability to the edge of the blanket if it were narrower than the ten rows I’ve done.
All advice welcomed. I’ll be right here, frozen with my unfinished blanket in my lap.
Love,
Ann

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118 Comments

118 Comments

  1. My vote is for your border being at least as wide as your widest bit of knitting in the square touching the border. See that green outside to the square? It looks symmetrical with your orange border. The tan/brown in that upper right square might be a little wider . . . looking forward to the finished product!

  2. Bind off right now–it’s perfect!

  3. Hmmm. It needs to be wider. At least as wide as that tan bit in the sqaure next to the green / pale green lemony square. If you’re worried about the orange-ness, add a green stripe into the orange. Personally, I’d go for 20 rows, 10 ridges, then 2 rows st st then cast off on the WS p-wise so you don’t see the cast-off sts. But then I’m picky….

  4. What Belinda said. But then, you could never have too much orange for my tastes.

  5. more orange. just a little. but definitely more–it has to hold its own, after all.

  6. Well, you do live in Tennessee..can you really have too much orange in TN?

  7. OK, so here’s the voice of dissent: less orange, at least down to six rows. That is, if the stability looks/feels good to you. I am so much enamored of the interplay of the color blocks that I believe a wide orange border will detract. If I could just make myself believe that I could bring such a lovely project to fruition, I would cast on right now. Y’all are such fun!

  8. ah yes….the thinner the border, the better. it’s definately all about your squares! but if this particular yarn seems to be felt-y, with a tendency to break,….i would go for a huskier orange yarn, to give the edge some body. does that make any sense? LOVE it!

  9. Just the way it is or a tad wider. Not a big wide orange border. Just an accent to make the orange in the blanket body pop. By the way, it’s a stunning blanket! I’d want to make one myself if I weren’t scared off by all the yarn ends (blecch).

  10. love the orange the way it is…and that’s from someone who LOVES orange, as evidenced in my orange and red log cabin-inspired baby blanket.

  11. I think right now, it’s either too much or not enough. I’m leaning toward not enough. I think about 20 rows would be excellent. It would make a nice wide border, which I think would serve to make the squares really pop, like a good framing job on a piece of art.

  12. For the record, I just did three garter ridges, and I think it looks dandy. But I have more color variety in my 36-square blanket. XXO

  13. I agree with Lara. It’s either too much or not enough. At present, it looks to be about 1 1/2 inches wide. If you go for a wider border, it should be about 3-4 inches. If you go for a thinner border, it should be about 1/2 inch (2-3 garter ridges?).

  14. Ann, I know it’s just a matter of opinion, but I’m a minimalist when it comes to frames and borders. My other hobby is photography, and when framing photographs I tend to go for a narrow, plain dark frame which draws attention to the photo rather than to itself.
    Your miters are remarkable, and I think that the 10 rows of orange frames them well. I like that the width of the orange is similar to the width of the adjacent green. I’m not sure why I like that, but I really do. To go much more than a couple rows wider than this would give you a definite “ORANGE” feeling, and it too would be lovely, but like you said, it would be a “committment to orange.”
    I look forward to seeing what you decide to do. Either way, it will be absolutely beautiful. Best of luck in making your decision!
    I also look forward to the day when I knit my first blanket and have such decisions to make. I’d been thinking that my first blanket would be a log cabin, but after seeing this new creation of yours, I’m inspired. Miter or log cabin, miter or log cabin…hmmmmm…

  15. I was going to say cast off now, it looks great! Then I read Belinda’s post, and I think she had a great idea. You could split the difference and do 2 rows stockinette here and cast off in purl. I think that’d look good!

  16. 2 rows less. If you look at it now, your eye goes straight to the border since the contrast is obvious. Squinch your eyes and see what you see. If you do as much as you have done all the way around it will pull your eye to the edge and detract from the wonderfulness of the squares…. of course…it is ALL just opinion.. What makes you happy???

  17. I think the orange is the most eye-catching color in the blocks. If you make the orange border narrow, maybe even as narrow as the orange line in block showing in this post, it will not overpower the total design. You want the eye to move over the whole blanket, not focus on the edging. I did not go back to see the whole blanket and notice how much orange there is overall, though, so take this advice with a grain of sand in the eye or whatever you have handy.

  18. Duh, never mind, the whole blanket is the first thing on the page. I still like the idea of a narrow orange border, if you think it will be enough to stabilize the blankie.

  19. You are good to go. You have reached the moment of orange stasis.

  20. I think that 10 rows is PERFECT!

  21. I think that 10 rows is PERFECT!

  22. I think that 10 rows is PERFECT!

  23. I think that 10 rows is PERFECT!

  24. Let me toss in another suggestion, to make the orange a “matting”, the same as or wider than the wide green stripe you show it touching. Then finish it off with a very narrow band of the darkest color you’ve used in the blanket. Navy? Brown? It’s just a suggestion.

  25. ITs perfect right now!!!! just bind off now!!!!!!
    p.s. i love your site

  26. ITs perfect right now!!!! just bind off now!!!!!!
    p.s. i love your site

  27. I’m afraid to weigh in as your head is likely already swimming, but I say just a little bit wider. 3 more rows, then bind off on wrong side? (And loosely, dear girl, looooosely!)

  28. What a beautiful blanket, well planned and executed. I definately vote for the thinner-the-better element. As the photographer said, you just want to frame it. 3 ridges sound about right.

  29. I cast my vote for just a little wider. About 2 or 3 ridges more. And if you plan to put mitred squares in the corners I would use the greens and or browns from the blanket.

  30. Less IS more, it’s true…

  31. I really like it the way it is, but I think it could go bigger too. I wouldn’t make it any smaller. I think it’s going to look fabulous however you do it!

  32. I really like it the way it is, but I think it could go bigger too. I wouldn’t make it any smaller. I think it’s going to look fabulous however you do it!

  33. I really like it the way it is, but I think it could go bigger too. I wouldn’t make it any smaller. I think it’s going to look fabulous however you do it!

  34. I always love how fearless you are with combining colors. Be bold! I think you’ll find that amount of garter stitch that you need to keep the edges from rolling will be the perfect amount of orange for your blanket. (Stunning blanket, by the way…)

  35. I’m with Kate up there – stop now, do the two ss rows and bindoff wrong side. It seems quite orangey probly cuz it’s such a strong contrast. I think it will “wash” out a little – especially if you leave it this width. I think this will also make the too much/not enough folks happier too. And anyway, I have to tell ya, you almost make me want to make a blanket. Almost. It’s beautimous. Make yourself happy. and don’t over think.

  36. I agree with Maggi: 3 garter ridges seems perfect. You want an accent, not something that’ll overwhelm the grandeur that is the squares. — Beth in Waterloo, Ontario

  37. Howdy,
    As a quilter, I would encourage you to make a narrow orange border (maybe the same width as the narrow orange squares within), then a wider border beyond, of a warm color that won’t compete. I’d personally do the brown to complete out the 20 rows.
    I am really impressed with the progress of this project and how beautiful it is! Congratulations!

  38. I say what you said “Go all out on the orange”.

  39. charts and graphs…. write down every vote , calculate and compare …see who says what.
    WHOA!!!!! WHAT THE HELL???? go for the border.. use up all that orange stuff and let your border speak!!!!! Let the orange border dominate the blanket… the squares will speak up for themselves and the border will shine in all it’s glory. Let it be a celebration of fall.. a blanket in a full blaze of orange glory. After all, what are you going to do if you have any of that orange leftover?
    and if I am wrong???? well… you can always RIP IT!!!!!!!!!!!

  40. Oy! Such anyalysis paralysis!
    Move on to the next side and remember,
    “DONE IS GOOD”!
    I, too, love orange. I’ve never met an orange quilting cotton that I wouldn’t buy. But, a little goes a long way. So, stop now and move on.

  41. Use your rule of thirds…make it 1/3, 2/3, 1 1/3 (etc) as wide as a repeating width in the blanket.
    Me personally–I like the narrow. It’s like hanging a modern painting on the wall with no frame. Did Mondrian need a wide matting?

  42. I think maybe a few rows moore – but not more than 5. You just want enough orange to accent the blanket, not make it look like a construction worker in a orange vest.

  43. I vote for binding off now. I think it looks great!

  44. Stop right now. It looks fabulous. Remember, less can be more! (The inspiration for that saying: the handtowels I’m making for a friend’s powder room — you CAN go overboard with the frills and such…)

  45. Stop right now. It looks fabulous. Remember, less can be more! (The inspiration for that saying: the handtowels I’m making for a friend’s powder room — you CAN go overboard with the frills and such…)

  46. less is more! and you’ll be done sooner.
    I’d go for the three ridges. Good luck!

  47. Go all out. I think it will look really modern. Plus – go all out is pretty much my advice in any given situation. :)

  48. I say wider, maybe 20 rows if 10 is what you have now. I think the point of the border is to “frame” it. And that is what you will be doing with the orange!

  49. I say embrace the orange and make a nice wide border. (This despite the fact that I usually hate orange because it makes me look like I am about to die. So I do not have any orange clothes or orange in my house.) I definitely would not go smaller, and would probably go larger.

  50. I’m thinking less is more also. Maybe take what you’ve got and fold it over if you’re worried about the stability, or would that look too i-cord-y? Whatever you decide, I love it, and I’m sure I’ll smack myself upside the head once I see the completed border and say “Of course! It’s perfect! Why didn’t I think of that?”

  51. Well, heck, my first thought was MORE! Twice as wide as it is now. But then I read the comments, and went back and looked, several times – and now I’m paralyzed, too. ;-)
    I’m thinking just a few more – like two or three more garter ridges. However, I think, whatever you decides, it’s going be beautiful.

  52. I vote for the narrow orange border, same width as the interior orange, but I also like it without the border at all, the blocks stand on their own beautifully..and it is beautific…lovely work

  53. I vote for the narrow orange border, same width as the interior orange, but I also like it without the border at all, the blocks stand on their own beautifully..and it is beautific…lovely work

  54. There’s a reason you’re stuck at the 10 row point. Your subconscious is telling you it’s time to stop. So STOP. It looks great.

  55. As long as a narrow border does the job structurally (i.e. garter stitch to calm down the stockinette roll) I say, go as narrow as possible. Keep the orange as a jazzy accent.

  56. Please do not succumb to orangeness! The subtle contrasts and combinations in the blanket will be killed by too much orange. Most of the colors are soft (and lovely, I think–I’m not much of an intense color girl) and the orange is too saturated a color. Listen to the photographer. As Nancy pointed out, you stopped for a reason–enough with the orange,already, and use up any leftovers on another project. (This sounds a bit commanding, but I love the blanket, and I want to save it from rampaging orange. Not that I hate orange–I once made an orange sweater, and wore it, even though it is not my best color.)

  57. Lay it out and put orange paper, material, scarves, whatever you have around it at the wide width and shoot a picture, then at the narrower width, another picture. Then any other width. You can look at for the initial impression, but with the pictures, you can put them side by side and see the difference. It might be wacky but you could make 2 sides wide, and 2 sides narrow.I’m a visual person, and when I see pictures of mock ups the solution usually pops out at me.Saves a lot of time frogging.

  58. Wow – so many great ideas! I’d go for a bit less orange maybe 6 rows total to be more like the orange showing in the one square with orange we see — and — then add a darker edging of at least 8 rows — and then…I’d not bind off yet but run a piece of kitchen cotton through (if you need your needle to do the next side) — do an adjacent side – and make the final decision when I could see at least 2 sides done. Then in the BO I’d follow the suggestion of a couple of rows of stockinette followed by a WS purl BO. I’m in the school of too much orange is going to take away from all the wonderful subtlety of the mix of colors.

  59. Good gravy. (They do say that in Tennessee, don’t they?) My opinion is that in the first picture where everything’s all squished up, the border as-is looks totally wonderful.
    (the “good gravy” is in response to the vociferous comments… so good that everyone has individual tastes and we’re unafraid to share our opinions.)

  60. I love the orange border, but as a quilter I agree that it needs one more border…maybe a narrow orange border with a slightly wider dark border to really frame things.

  61. Good Grief, Girl, you write the books, what do we know??? Stop now, so you can finish it and make something else fabulous – it’s perfect.

  62. I think a narrower border. It’s detracting from the squares. I think it should just be an accent of the pop of orange in the blanket. That’s all.

  63. Narrower. 6 rows if that’s enough to stabilize, maybe 8. The orange is going to be a strong, strong frame.
    Also, this blanket is about the most gorgeous thing ever.

  64. I say make it 10 rows wider, then rip out 8 of them, and then add 5 more rows. Builds character!
    Really, no matter what the width, the orange border is the perfect thing to make the oranges in the squares pop. I think it looks good in the photo, but a little more or a little less will also look fine. In any case, it’s going to be the most beautiful mitered blanket ever!

  65. I am voting on the stop now side. I agree with whomever said your subconscious told you it was done. It looks sooooo good. Just beautiful. Too much orange will detract, I fear.

  66. Stop right now. It’s perfect.
    Either that, or sleep on it.
    Either that, or leave it spread somewhere you seldom go so you can be surprised by it. Notice your first impression and go by that.
    Either that, or let the majority rule!
    Damn. I’m not much help.

  67. I agree with the narrow-orange inner border + a slightly darker and wider outer border advocates. The orange is stunning, but a narrow orange border will echo those outlined orange squares in the four that have them, and the dark neutral border will balance it all.
    I would make the orange inner border about 3 ridges and the darker outer border about 7 ridges, wider only if it looks like it needs it.

  68. I’m in the less orange border camp. I have to agree that it is starting to detract from your B-U-T-FULL blanket. I think orange was a good choice, but I would stick with only 2 or 3 ridges. Do just enough to get the stability you want. If you can’t get that in only 2 or 3 ridges, then switch to a more neutral color for the remaining border.

  69. Add me to the less orange camp. I think about 3 ridges would be right. I think what you have (extrapolated to all four sides), or wider, makes your blanket look too “contained”. I think you want something barely outlined.
    I like this blanket — though I can’t imagine owning that much orange yarn ;-)

  70. I vote for a narrower orange border – about as wide as the orange stripe in the pale gray square in the upper right of the photo. If you think that’s not wide enough to give the stability needed, maybe the suggestion of a stripe of another color in the ornge – dark green or dark gray.

  71. Just to add to your confusion…..I would go for the narrow border but I would edge it with 3 or 4 rows of single crochet…I find that it is easier to work the edges and sometimes I find that garter stitch flares out. Anyhoo, hope that your paralytic condition clears up soon and you can move one to another project. Btw, this one is tres chic!

  72. I like the current width, it looks good. However, I would ‘swatch’ if you will, next to the red looking square before the final decision. I also really like the matting idea Amy suggested earlier. Depending on the look next to the reddish square, you may want to use the darkest color and then ten rows of the orange. The orange is really good with all the other colors. I could just be my monitor that makes me think that square could be trouble.
    I am not sure we are helping.

  73. Oh. I did not think it needed any edge at all – I thought it was “done” with just the squares!

  74. 1) I like the idea of keeping the orange border at current width.
    2) I also like the idea of keeping orange at current, or a bit lesser, width. THEN add a wider dark colored border to finish it off.

  75. 1) I like the idea of keeping the orange border at current width.
    2) I also like the idea of keeping orange at current, or a bit lesser, width. THEN add a wider dark colored border to finish it off.

  76. 1) I like the idea of keeping the orange border at current width.
    2) I also like the idea of keeping orange at current, or a bit lesser, width. THEN add a wider dark colored border to finish it off.

  77. How about I throw a wrench in…..and suggest you make the other sides of the border in another color? This one WIDE and then maybe green or brown or sumpin’ else on the other sides?
    Its ideas like that that keep me paralyzed too.

  78. It’s a beautiful blanket, it will be a beautiful border! Follow your instincts – look what you’ve achieved so far by doing just that, they won’t let you down.
    Relax…enjoy it…it will be just fine.
    (And anyway, nothing about the border is irreversible, so why worry?).

  79. Looks good now, although keep in mind that the orange will appear even stronger once you have all 4 sides done.

  80. the blanket is LOVELY. i’d go orange i-cord all the way around and call it a day!
    whatever you do- and you are probably already done! – it will be masterful!

  81. I thought this over yesterday but did not reply, looked at it again today and here is my answer: At first I was going to say stop now it looks good and in my mind there IS such a thing as too much Orange. (I spent my teen years in a home with a beutiful Orange carpet…It dated fast.) But on second look after studying the whole blanket it seems that it needs to be a bit wider in an effort to be in proportion to the size of the blanket. I know you were planning to use up all the oranges on each side but I think that you should do the border all the way around and miter the corners–But layering stripes of oranges in a miter might be a little much–so you’d have to add at least one color to that… and start over.
    I didn’t see Kay’s opinion yet in the comments. After all this wide and varied advice I hope you hold out for her thoughts, she seems to be the authority on borders.

  82. Like the idea of two tone border. Some orange with a smaller band of dark color. Reminds me of a double mat in framing. Hope the huge number of comments doesn’t add to your paralysis!

  83. I like it just the way it is, not too big, not too little. Just right. I think you *can* go overboard with the orange…orange is a tricky, bitchy beast, always trying to steal attention away from the other colors of the spectrum. Add another ten ridges, and it will turn into “Look, I made this fab orange border and then had to put some squares into to hold it up.” It becomes all about the orange border. It should be all about those *gorgeous* squares.
    Good luck with it!
    Lily

  84. My first impulse was, coming from a quilting background: narrow orange border, and then one of the muted greens to finish it off, maybe at least 3 times as wide as the narrow orange border you decide on. However, I like the orange I-cord bind-off idea a LOT. That could also be incorporated into the whole – narrow orange border to finish the composition, wider medium green border, then a darker green I-cord bind-off.

  85. I think it looks just orangey enough

  86. I love the blanket with no border. It is exquisite as is. I am a firm believer in crocheting around the border to add strength and stability. Two rows or so and you’re done.
    Katinka

  87. Either no more (and even a little less) or go for it and add a bunch more to make it an orange blankie.
    You aren’t paralyzed. You’re caught on a balance point.

  88. I like it the way it is. However, I also think that have diffrent oranges for the border will add another blocky design element to the whole thing so I say cast off right now with green, and use the same green to cast off on all four sides to reign in and frame the orange.
    Or, and this is ridiculous, rip it out and re-knit five ridges with a double strand of two contrasting oranges for a thick, stable, sturdy, ultra-tweedy border. Or even double strand orange and green.
    Whatever you chose will look great, you can’t really wreck it at this point.

  89. I suggest that you take it back down to 5 rows of garter – and it should be fine – too much orange might overwhelm the thing –

  90. 10 is perfection in the Olympic world, yes?
    To paraphrase Mr. Frankenstein, “10 GOOD!”.

  91. Try an i-cord border. Less orange.

  92. Try an i-cord border. Less orange.

  93. Go big with the orange!!!!!

  94. I love love love love LOVE your blanket!!! I think the ten rows looks terrific, but I’ll probably be swayed into thinking 20 is perfect if that’s where you end up. Me, I would start with the shortest yardage yarn, and let er rip. See how far it goes before I run out/get bored/panicked about just how much border it is I’m committing to here. But. I love love (etc. see above) the color blocking instead of all the stripes of other mitered squares! And I really like THEM too!! Every project is a revelation.

  95. Is there some sort of traditional wisdom, maybe from the quilting world, on border width/depth????

  96. Ummm… maybe you had a busy weekend and didn’t finish this yet and I’m not entirely too late, but, uh, well, here I go, since you asked. I love orange. Lots of orange. And I love me them wide garter-stitch north-of-the-M-D-line Kay borders. Though I usually am on a deadline and barely throw on a quick row of crochet around the edge. But whatever.
    The thing I’m thinking is, too wide on the orange, and it will be strange, not because of the orange-ness, but because of the solidness of the one block of color on each side. I would look at something like
    3 ridges orange,
    4 ridges grey or brown,
    2 ridges green
    2 grey or brown
    2 green
    (and maybe end on grey or brown)
    With different greens/oranges/greys/browns on all sides. Keeps your stripes going, keeps your colors going, adds a strong and delicious orange cohesiveness without giving a big blob around the edges.
    Can’t wait to see the finished blanket – sha-wow!

  97. Coming out of lurkdom to vote for at least another ten rows on the border. I think, when it comes to orange, moderation is impossible. Either you use only a little bit of orange, or you just jump in with both feet. And you kind of jumped in with both feet long time ago on this one.
    I think 20 rows will look great, and it possibly could even take 30 rows, though that might start to get overwhelming.
    I love this blanket, it’s so awesome!

  98. Definitely, Definitely use a little more orange. Don’t go the full ten rows, though. I think 4-6 more rows of that would really pop the orange without detracting from the overall GORGEOUSNESS of the blanket. But then, what do I know? I’m just a design student. It’s your blanket, so do whatever it takes to make YOU love it!

  99. I’m in the “less is more” camp, and would liken it to a simple edge on a fabric quilt*. I’d stop while I was ahead (ie: now) or rip back a few rows. That being said, it will look fabulous however you choose to finish it.
    (*the name of that particular piece of fabric is swimming around my brain *just* out of reach, but it will be catchacble as soon as I hit the “post” button.)

  100. Oh dear – I started reading the comments before I wrote my own, and now I don’t know again.
    And who says 5 varieties of orange tweed yarns on hand is too much!! I love the orange.

  101. Knit 10 rows of garter stitch in orange on the opposite edge of the blanket and then decide whether that’s too much, just right, or not enough.

  102. Love love love orange–almost as much as I love blue which is its complement. Go wide!
    And anyway (don’t ask me how I know this, but) isn’t the Titans’ color orange?

  103. Ok, I’ll jump in with my 2¢ worh: I think the orange in the blanket is perfect, and adding the orange border makes it pop LESS. I think a narrow-ish border of a neutral color-the grays/taupes/tans/browns–pick one–will finish it off nicely, and allow the orange and greens to speak louder.
    I LOVE this blanket!
    (One time my 8th grade teacher commented on my attempt at abstract art and said I should stop outlining all my shapes in black, that the colors could speak for themselves. I guess I still believe him.)

  104. Stop where you are. Orange is a weird and wonderful color, but if you go further, you will have a very orange blanket. I just finished my own with a 8 row black border and it was perfect! (Thanks to you) I also felt maybe I should add a little more, but I think in the long run you should stop now. Plus, you’ll be finished sooner. I also know how exciting it is to finish a project of this magnitude. I was just giddy for a few days.

  105. I LIKE THE ORANGE AT ITS PRESENT WIDTH!!
    I ALSO like the idea of keeping the orange at its current width AND adding a wider border, of the darkest color (or A dark color) to it. The dark color will frame your blanket in such a way as to give the “just right” finishing touch to your Masterpiece.
    LoveDiane

  106. Keep orange border AS IS, or a little narrower. Then add a WIDER border of the darkest color(or A dark color). The wider, dark color will frame and accent your blanket. It will bring your Masterpiece into beautiful focus!
    LoveDiane

  107. Keep orange border AS IS, or a little narrower. Then add a WIDER border of the darkest color(or A dark color). The wider, dark color will frame and accent your blanket. It will bring your Masterpiece into beautiful focus!
    LoveDiane

  108. It’s not “orange,” it’s “rust.” And it’s perfect at 10 rows. Stop fretting, enjoy, and knit away.

  109. De-lurking to add my opinion! :-) I think it needs either a very wide or very narrow border. The current width seems indecisive, if that makes any sense. (But wasn’t that the problem to begin with?) If you do go for wider, definitely use a different color, or a mix. The orange is in danger of overwhelming! Is it very obvious that orange is my least favorite color?

  110. In my judgement, I think the final border should be at least 1/2 the width of one of the quarter squares.
    Whether that width should be all orange or not–I would get out all my orange fabrics (or whathaveyou) and lay them on the rug, and put the blankie on top and see if the border takes over. The center of that blankie is very large and NOT orange, and you’re looking for balance. Right now the border may be a bit overwhelming because we’re all focusing on it as the subject of discussion.
    Put down some orange edges made of other things and leave it for a day. Come back with fresh eyes and you will probably see what you need to see.

  111. I’m loving it right now — just a dash of color without overwhelming any of the other colors. And I’m not even an orange person, so that is really saying something.

  112. Less orange. If the border would be stable enough, I think it should only be as wide as your small orange stripes in the blanket, maybe I cord as many others have suggested?
    “There is less danger in fearing too much than too little.”
    ~Francis Walsingham

  113. If I look at this as a form of a quilt, of which I’ve made many, then I’d suggest a very narrow orange border, perhaps around half an inch, followed by a wider green or gray border. Think of the orange as a trim on the mat of a framed photo, followed by a wider mat.
    Beautiful work, btw, whatever you choose.

  114. THINK MONDRIAN…ALL THESE LOVELY SQUARES ,AND LINES NOT MANY THE SAME ,I AM IN THE WIDE BORDER CAMP ,AS YOU WILL NEARLY ALWAYS HAVE THE BLANKET FOLDED…HEAPED ON A SOFE/CHAIR/BED …I THINK IT WILL LOOK AS THOUGH YOU RAN OUT OF YARN IF THE BORDER IS NARROW…WELL DONE, ITS LOVELY WHAT EVER YOU CHOOSE TO DO…

  115. If it were any other color, I’d say it needs to be as wide as the widest stripe in your block. Since it’s so very orange-y, I’d say it needs to be the same width as the narrowest stripe in your block, which it looks like it is right now. So bind off! Bind off!

  116. You have the orange yarn and you want to use it because you ARE in Tennessee, no?
    Other people may not understand this, but I have a UT grad for a neighbor – she even has a maramalade tom cat named Tennessee.

  117. Go on…commit to orange. More, more, MORE! Wider, bigger, better! It’s gorgeous!!

  118. I say stop where you are – good width.