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Boo Freakin’ Hoo

Dear Kay,
I’m sitting here with my English muffin and coffee, having a moment with the New York Times Book Review. I figure: if I’m reduced to listening to books on tape instead of actually reading, I can sure as heck read a crummy book review.
So here I am, reading about this new biography of Alexander Hamilton, who (for those like me who can’t remember why he’s on the $20 bill) was the Founding Parent of our country who was really into, you know, economic policy.
I read this:
“While others resented him with a furious passion or gaped at him with amazement–Talleyrand considered him one of the three greatest men of the epoch–Hamilton himself was lacerated with a feeling of ‘personal inadequacy that the world seldom saw.’ ”
And I find myself in tears, boohooing into my cup of Costco Ethiopian Yirgacheffe, imagining the poor guy duking it out with Thomas Jefferson over the future of the American economy. Oh, Al! Lacerated. You poor slob! You must have been working so hard.
Does anyone else out there have this kind of hormonal freakout? It’s one thing to see a baby and burst into tears, but really. Alexander Hamilton? Get me a red tent, please. I’m going into hibernation until this passes.
Love,
Ann

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38 Comments

38 Comments

  1. Whew! Ann, you scared me. I saw the title of your post in my email box and thought Keava had come undone or something.
    I can’t say the Founding Fathers ever drew a tear from me, but I did have a hormonal weepfest reading the part in Robinson Crusoe when our hero discovers limes on his island. Finally he could have mojitos.
    Cristina

  2. i seriously think something is wrong with me.
    i cry at the most unexpected and inappropriate times, before any manifestations of conflict/masses of people coming together for a cause-any cause. i have cried at political marches. i have cried at my son’s christmas potluck lunch at the YMCA. i cried a couple of weeks ago at “Goodbye, Lenin!” (i know, it’s a comedy.) i teared up watching footage from Woodstock last week at work. and jimi hendrix has never done much for me in the past. *sigh*. does knitting help your nerves?

  3. Ann, you’re totally right that reading about *anyone* who was “lacerated with a feeling of personal inadequacy” is worth shedding a tear over.
    Must be something in the air (worldwide?) or maybe it’s age (are we all 43?), but I do the same thing — and, indeed, at the oddest times and over the oddest things! And the things that you would *expect* to cry over (my son as Jesus in “Godspell” last weekend, or the coverage of the combat death of the football player whose name I can’t even remember) can absolutely lay me *out!*
    On the other hand, Kelli Ann, if you truly have concerns that you might be moving too far in a direction you don’t want to go, please find a professional to talk to! Knitting can calm your nerves, yes, but there are other options, as well.
    Buy, hey, the world can always use a little more demonstrated compassion, right?

  4. Once at Davidson, I walked in to find my beloved roommate weeping over a Duke Power commercial–the one with the Christmas tree and the homeless man?? Please! Even Hitler himself would have cried us a river at that one! Then we sat to watch the Hallmark movie, “Dance with the White Dog” and boo-hooed our collegiate eyes out. It’s the weepiest we’ve ever been, and it was during exams. I’m sure there was some connection.
    Lacerated *is* a pretty good participle. I’m feeling a little emotional about it myself, come to think of it.

  5. Buckets.At the slightest,and most surprising thing ! Um,44 might have something to do with it.That,and not being testosterone bound.I think it’s a ‘good thing’.The things I cry ,most over : my own inadequacies.

  6. I think that a political march is an appropriate time to cry, especially in the wake of last weekend here in D.C.

  7. you’re darn right – a show of emotion is not necessarily inappropriate. and it also feels pretty good.

  8. The male members of Hubby’s family are famous for their free-flowing tears on all occasions. Hubby routinely enjoys a silent, manly boo-hoo over televised sports and the poignant (although to me, incomprehensible)locker room interviews afterward. I never knew Hubby’s dad but the story goes that whenever he attended a funeral, even of someone he knew only slightly, he kept his sunglasses on throughout the proceedings.
    This is all healthy and good. Personally, I have a problem with (1) extremely good commercials involving people using a 10 cents per minute calling plan to phone their mothers and (2) school assemblies. When the assembled children and parents start in on the school song (“I walk through the door/I see all my friends….”), I just lose it. (Honestly! I’m tearing up just from typing that!) And I am the only one so affected, so it’s sorta embarrassing. I’m not even an alum!
    Ann, I think it was more the ‘lacerated’ than the Alexander Hamilton, but when you come to visit me, as you surely will any day now, we’ll be sure to stop and lay a few flowers on his grave at Trinity Church.
    Kay,
    Co-proprietor of Mason-Dixon Knitting: The First Openly Peri-Menopausal Fiber Arts Blog

  9. Sorry MaryB, it’s not an age thing. I’m 25 and deeply in the throes of odd tears. The worst is that I do not cry over “normal” things, but will indeed cry over television commercials. Perhaps there is a knitting connection. Hmm. Or maybe not. The more I knit the less I bawl; it’s like chewing gum for my mind.

  10. I was telling my 13 year old son the other day that my brother used to break down sobbing, dripping tears on his TV tray, at an old Coke commercial where the grandmother invited the grandkids over to see the new Yellow Lab puppies (I remember there were “12!”). Paul was, I dunno, 15 or so. He would flee the room, hoping to escape the deluge. In fact, much later as an “adult” he cancelled his “Reader’s Digest” subscription because the stories (always happy!) made him weep!
    And, Elizabeth, you’re too young to know that I’m *glad* to know it’s not an age thing! :-) Although it does seem to be getting more pronounced as I get older….

  11. Aaaaaaagh! marching bands! I am the only person who sobs when marching bands pass by – drums of any kind! Annhb, 38.

  12. I also find a good crying spell quite rejuvenating. In fact, when I’m stressed, I always seem to have a crying jag at the weirdest times, but I always feel so much better after it’s over.
    As an example, I’m in middle of a major crunch period at school right now (halfway through with my Masters – yay!), and am constantly tense because of it. My husband tried to take me out to dinner the other night to help me relax. Well, the salmon I ordered was dry as a bone and I simply burst into tears. Right there in the restaurant. Thankfully, my husband has been through many of these moments and just let me get it out. I felt so much better afterwards!
    Oh – and any commercials that reunite families will get me going (long distance calling, airlines, anything).
    :-)
    Nancy (32 and a half)

  13. Poor Alexander…boooo-hoooooo. sniffle. On any given day the leaves on the trees (or the absence thereof) is all it takes! My opthamologist starts most of his sentences with “Well you know dear, you are at the AGE for (fill in the blank with increasingly expensive trifocal doohickey…..) that sort of thing”
    I have it on Good Authority that All the Magic starts for Women at age 50.
    I can’t freakin’ WAIT…and it won’t be LONG!

  14. Hey, y’all, I’m a total wreck at this point.
    I hardly need point out that here in Nashville, there are enough sad songs that they run Elavil in the water. Here are some real wipeouts:
    She Is His Only Need–Wynonna Judd (lyrics by Dave Loggins)
    Walking in the Sunshine by Roger Miller
    And the Saddest Country Song In History: He Stopped Loving Her Today by George Jones

  15. Oh my god Ann – STOP ! How much more can we take ?Just read the lyrics to the George Jones number, talk about music to slash your wrists to ! I’ve never even heard of Alexander Hamilton (‘scuse my Scottish ignorance – tho’ he sounds like a Scot with that name ?)but I’m weeping buckets with you.

  16. Hey I’m not alone! People using take the mick out of me for crying at adverts on the TV – now I know I’m in excellent company!! I don’t think mine’s an age thing but it is getting a bit worse as I get on, 41 now, heavens alone knows what I’ll be like when I’m 70!!

  17. At the moment, I will cry at ANYTHING -but then I have the optimum excuse of hormones completely overtaking what I had thought was *my* body…
    Last real major weepy was the last 30mins or so of Return of the King – hubby was wiping his eyes there too, but any reality show involving people in hospital or kids doing marvellous things… well, pass the box of tissues, please.
    Last week I cried because the neighbours dug up & burnt a shrub I particularly liked seeing out of the window. (It was the neighbour’s shrub).
    This week I’ve cried because I was tired & my feet wouldn’t fit into my boots at all.
    (I’m 31 & nearly 38wks pregnant)
    Jo
    xxx

  18. Yesterday 4 different people came into my office at separate times, shut the door, and cried. Not just weeping, but major boo-hoo howling. One was my daughter, because she lost her key and her brother was mean to her. One was a colleague, because her chair was mean to her. Two were students, because they thought the exam was at 2, when it had already taken place at 9.
    I can go months without a single person needing a tissue in my office (I do not speak of my home, which is Another Thing). What was it about yesterday? Even the weather was rainy.
    I am 43, at least for another few weeks.
    Buy shares in Kleenex, I say.
    Love to all,
    Aara

  19. Once, when I was twelve and in a weird mood, I cried because I realized that I would never actually be able to go to Fraggle Rock. Top that one.

  20. go jo go!
    motherhood has opened up a whole slew of emotions i never knew i could have. i.e. welling up with pride. and the gamut of emotions benjamin (2 1/2) runs through in any given day– no wonder they are so exhausted by sundown! it actually helps me understand my own states.
    motherhood & the sudden need to make everybody in the house cozy slippers. -kaf

  21. As a newly 44 year old I can definitely relate to the sob at any moment. A song, commercial, story, Oprah and John Edwards. I don’t think I ever had a dry eye watching those two.
    So have we concluded is it an age thing or a knitting thing? Maybe both?!?

  22. Oh. My. God. I’m SO glad I’m not the only one!
    But I guess it’s hormones or something at 46 because I am a goner, just reading these posts! Lacerated with a feeling of personal inadequacy, indeed. Every frigging day.
    Already this morning, I lost it, although I had to hide it from Clif, I was just too embarrassed. Let’s just say it had to do with your mother and the dedication, and subject, of his latest book.
    My latest big political advertisement boohoo was in the Republic of Georgia. This will get you going. A father and teenage son are at home getting up, making breakfast, getting dressed, getting their things together and getting ready to go out. They both arrive at the front door at the same time. The son is wearing his student protest organization T-shirt, and the father is wearing his police camo uniform and carrying his rifle. They walk out the door together, smiling. The caption is, “Together, we can win.” The corrupt president was indeed overthrown a few days later.
    boooo! hoooooooo!

  23. 38 yrs old here, and recently wept big buckets o’tears over a radio program. (Your Canadian readers may be familiar with the Vinyl Cafe on CBC.) The host told the true story of a young boy who went over Niagara Falls and lived to tell the tale. Maybe it was all the water in the story that called forth the tears?

  24. The Tear-Jerkin’ Tune of the Day:
    Bonnie Raitt:
    “I can’t make you love me (if you don’t)”
    Ann, Feel free to find a link to the full lyrics, which get booier and hooier as Bonnie wails on.
    I also got weepy watching a re-re-re-run on PBS of ‘Roy Orbison and Friends’, which they play every dang fundraising campaign, when I caught a glimpse of Bruce Springsteen just playing in the band. And there was Elvis (C.)! Also happy to be a mere strummer in the backdrop of Greatness! And there was k.d.! The Big Boned Gal herself, swaying along with the back-up singers (which included Bonnie and Jennifer Warnes can.you.imagine) and willing her voice to blend. It was all too much.
    How long must I dream?
    Laceratedly yours, Kay

  25. you have really touched a nerve! i think it’s so remarkable because weeping feels so damn irrational. but then again, feeling lacerated by personal inadequacy is pretty irrational too.
    off to feel the sun warming my back on the way home, hugs,
    kelli ann

  26. Confession is good for the soul, right ladies?
    Debi, 40….a zillion *silly* things …the last ten episodes of Sex in the City, The “she’s his lobster” episode of Friends, prolonged laceration from Holloween til New Years specifically because of the Publix commercials, game shows, Emergency Vets, Meet Joe Black, Enya: Orinoco Flow, Band-Aid, Do They Know it’s Christmas? and I leave you with Dido, White Flag…I will go down with this ship and I won’t put my hands up and surrender.There will be no white flag above my door,I’m in love and always will be ….
    Ahh, I needed a good cry…I feel ya, Al!!

  27. Message for Susan –
    you *CAN* go to Fraggle Rock – it was filmed at St. Anthony’s Head near St. Mawes in Cornwall, UK. There’s a little lighthouse on the headland, and that’s where it was filmed. Ok, the Fraggles may not be there anymore (but maybe they are…), but Fraggle Rock still is! I don’t live too far away from it (maybe 40mins drive or so), so can vouch for it’s real existence!
    Jo
    xxx

  28. the tears flowed freely in my vehicle on the way to work this morning. onlookers in traffic probably assumed i had just experienced a personal tragedy that led to my uncontrollable sorrow. but, alas, said onlookers would be mistaken. the cause of my deluge was the retirement of bob edwards as the host of morning edition after 24 1/2 years. how can i possibly go on? (i wish i had been crying over fraggle rock, which would be infinitely cooler and much less indicative of my current level of nerdiness.)

  29. My most memorable, unreasonable(?) cry was because the traffic was bad on the way home from work. Really, in the D.C.-metro area I think the traffic can definately be a tear-jerker, so maybe not so unreasonable, but I kept crying after I got home.

  30. Ok — I once SOBBED at the Joan and Melissa Rivers Story on the Lifetime Network.

  31. I must be related to your hubby’s family somewhere through its Scandinavian branches. Movies do it for me. I was a complete wet hen, erhh, cock, during the latter half of LotR: Return of the King. Worst of all, that old film ‘Love Story’, right next to the death scene in ‘Bambi’….

  32. not being able to find a parking space has done it for me. i am also very embarrassed to admit that last night i cried watching a re-run of top model when one girl got sent home.

  33. Love Story–BoooooHOOOOOOO!!!!!!

  34. Read your blog entry and said, sure I understand, but hormones are only part for me. Add in work stress, parental illness etc-I cry at lots of things. Then I saw 34 folks had comments, and I tear-ed up! I knew I couldn’t read them or I’d be here all night blubbering!
    keep on knitting! thanks for blogging.

  35. I cried like the rain last night. While tucking my little fella in he asked me ‘Mummy, why don’t I have any friends?’. (The older kids wouldn’t let him play football). Questions: why are kids so mean to each other and does this ever get any easier? My heart broke for him.

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