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Contest: The Bookmobile Just Pulled Into the Shaver’s Parking Lot

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Dear Ann,
I finally had a breakthrough about our Fifth Blogiversary Contest. I didn’t want it to be about knitting slipcovers for chairs. I may be singleminded in my enthusiasms, but I do realize that the appeal of knitting upholstery is not yet universal. I will bring people to this wonderland, one by one, but not in a day. (By the way, my upholstery-knitting chums, I have a CHART for my denim slipcover and I’m almost done with my WIP deck-clearing.)
The contest idea hit me when I was writing in my Abigail Thomas Notebook. You don’t have an Abigail Thomas Notebook? Well, if you read her book Thinking About Memoir, you may find it hard not to start one, and then you would see how much effort it takes to keep a notebook. I thought it would be easy but I’m finding it hard not to think, “Well THAT is sure a stupid thing to write in a notebook,” and cross it out immediately.
Today I wrote in my notebook, “Bookmobile.” Something I was reading jogged a sweet old memory of the Omaha Public Library’s summer bookmobile program circa 1967. Near the end of the school year, our teacher told us about the bookmobile’s schedule, and told us that if we read 10 books over the course of the summer, we would receive a Certificate in September.
To this day, I will pretty much kill for a Certificate.
And 10 books over the course of a summer? That’s nothing for a girl who had to be threatened with punishment to leave the rollaway bed on Grandma’s front porch and GO PLAY OUTSIDE for pity’s sake. The only challenge to the thing was getting to the Bookmobile to get the documentation necessary for the Certificate.
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The Bookmobile came once a week to the Shaver’s grocery store parking lot. Shaver’s was one of those not-so-super markets that died in the 70s, when people started driving further for luxuries like actual produce and wide aisles. It was a friendly, if dank and dimly lit place. They had an awesome newstand with Tiger Beat magazines, and one of the cashiers was a friend of my mom’s, which made me feel like a celebrity when I was checking out and she said hi. All the cashiers were moms. They had memorable coiffures. But back to the Bookmobile.
I rode my bike (a metallic blue Schwinn Sting-Ray with sparkly banana seat–thankyouUncleJohn FOREVER) to the Bookmobile every week. I took a shortcut on a dirt road. And if you think this scene can’t get any more wholesome and all-American, please know that at this time, I wore seersucker short sets with matching sleeveless tops. Appliqued fruit was standard. My haircut was known as the Pixie, my eyeglasses were always askew if not taped, and I had a tendency to breathe through my mouth. (In other words, I was adorable.) The Bookmobile was old (even then) and green, and inside it smelled like the back of your car, Ann, when filled with Judith Krantz novels.
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But what about the contest? The contest will be a drawing for copies of our new book ( a review–I do believe it’s the first– and a preorder deal, over at the Knitter’s Bookshelf) when it comes out in September. To enter, please leave a comment to this post no later than noon (EST) on Friday, July 25, with at least 2 of these 3 things:
1. A Bookmobile memory if you have one.
2. The title of a favorite chapter book from your childhood or your child’s childhood.
3. The title of a book you plan to read before the end of the summer of 2008.
There will be 10 winners, mostly randomly drawn but a couple will win on the basis of their Bookmobile memory inducing laughter, tears, or best of all, laughter-through-tears, Dolly Parton’s favorite emotion. (Cf. Steel Magnolias.)
Excuse me, I have to go see if eBay has any metallic blue Sting-Rays. Then I’m going to read Dr. Dolittle on the closest thing I can find to a rollaway bed.
Love,
Kay
P.S. The photos are from the Harris County (Mississippi) Library System. They are dated 1953, but the Bookmobile is about the same vintage as the one I remember from the late 60s.

651 Comments

651 Comments

  1. I lived too far out in the country for the bookmobile. My favorite day of the week was Thursday (my mom’s day off). She would take me to the library and i would check out the maximum 5 books allowed. I was always finished with all 5 before the next Thursday!

  2. Chapter book – Little House in the Big Woods
    Book to read this summer – Raw Shark Texts
    Thanks!!

  3. I’m too young for the bookmobile, but I used to love to go to our town library and load up on books. I loved the Ann of Green Gables series when I was younger. I still have all of them, perhaps I should reread them. I plan to read The China Study by T. Colin Campbell before the summer is over.

  4. It seems I will only come out of long-time lurkdom for BOOKS!
    1. We didn’t have a bookmobile in our town of 1,000, but we DID have an ancient & tiny library run by an even more ancient & tiny woman!
    2. My favorite is now a toss up between “Because of Winn Dixie” or “Flat Stanley” from reading them to my boys!
    3. I’d LOVE to read “Reconciliation” by Benazir Bhutto this summer!

  5. I never got to go to the bookmobile as a kid because we had a branch library close to home. BUT as a professional librarian I have ridden on the bookmobile. How’s that?
    As for a favorite chapter book as a kid, I loved Stuart Little. And before the summer is over I want to read Stephenie Myer’s Twilight.
    I answered all 3 – I really am an overachiever.

  6. Books!! My little VT town did not have a bookmobile. It had a library, open on Tuesday and Thursday. I was there while it was open, I alphabetized the books in the children’s section.
    As a young child, I was partial to all of Margarite Henry’s horse books. Justin Morgan had a Horse being a particular favorite.
    Now, I visit the library with my children every Monday. I plan to read Skeletons at The Feast by Chris Bojahalian this summer!

  7. Kay, those pictures brought back such memories, I lived in Mobile, Alabama back then, the Bookmobile would come to the grocery store about 8 blocks from our house.We’d have to carry the book back home,never as easy as going there. It was beige, many shades. My Aunt Louise and I would always get about five books put them in a grocery sack for the walk home. We’d sometimes stop and get a coke-cola at the drug store, it was a nickel! My favorite books were Louisa May Alcott and the Pollyanna series. I finally got my own copies & I still have them all to this day, they were very old copies that were my Grandmothers. I think this means that’s what I need to read again this summer….thanks for the thought!

  8. 1. I have no bookmobile story but I am a real library person. I was a child in the 1950’s and was a real bookworm. My mom was always telling me to go out a play. So I would take a blanket, a book and sit under a big maple tree in our front yard. We also walked to our local library at least 2 times a week and it was at least 1 mile each way. Of course we walked from a very young age as the world was safer some how.
    2.I read most of all the series books during that time frame. Nancy Drew, the Hardy boys, etc. My favorite series was the Cherry Ames series about a young nurse. My lifes desire at that time was to be a nurse and every one of these books thrilled me. I did not become a nurse until I was 30, but I have had over 31 years of being a nurse and a lot of my desire had to do with Cherry Ames RN.
    3. I love to read to this day. The book I am reading right now is: Sons of the humpback whale by Jodi Picoult. I should finish it soon. I am almost finished with her whole series of books. Very good reads and all different.
    I loved your first book and would love to win a copy of your next book.
    Judy Diehl

  9. 1. We had a tiny library too, which I read my way through, literally.
    2. My favourite children’s book was The Secret World of Og by Pierre Berton, which I reread this past June. I STILL love i, at age 52. My favourites to read to my daughter were the Junie B. Jones books.
    3. I want to reread The Lord of the Rings.
    Thanks for the contest. And for the blog.

  10. 1. I kinda remember a bookmobile, but we lived not far from the real library. Actually, the large van I remember may have had something to do with testing residents for TB. I always get those mixed up.
    2. My kids and I all enjoy Arthur Ransome’s Swallows and Amazons books. My all time favourite might just be Winter Holiday, or The Picts and the Martyrs.
    3. I am presently reading The Cryptonomicon, by Neal Stephenson, and since it’s about a million pages long, I don’t have plans for the next book in the queue. I’m pretty sure I can read the last half-million pages by the end of the summer.
    PS. Kay, I bought the schnell und trendy denim yarn, and I’m going to make a cardigan. Upholstery has been bumped down the list!
    xo

  11. No bookmobile memories (although we are about of the same vintage), but I do have very soft spots in my heart for two books from my young-reader days: Heidi and A Little Princess. My mother died when I was 6, I had what seemed at the time to be an evil stepmother, and the orphan fantasies ran thick and strong through my childhood. I grew up to be relatively well-adjusted, and I have a cordial, if not close relationship with my stepmom, so reading those two books over and over and over again must not have damaged my psyche (too much).
    Book to read over the summer: Dear American Airlines (I’m hoping that it will make me feel better about not being able to travel to California to see my sister this summer).

  12. Wow. I loved my bookmobile when I was young and living in Halifax, NS. It would come every week and I would bring my big bag of books back to return and come back with a big bag. It was often so heavy I had trouble carrying it. :)
    But I loved it. It was catered towards kids and had many paperbacks of interest but most importantly, it also had these great comics! collections of fantastic four, and on top of that collections of tin tin and asterix. My love of TinTin was directly from those days. Read ever Enid Blyton books and all the nancy drews they had. Weren’t a big fan of the Hardy Boys though :)
    I’m trying to finish reading “everything is misc.” in the next two weeks. Getting there….

  13. 1. Sadly, I never experienced the Bookmobile, so I can’t share a story.
    2. I’d have to say “Sarah, Plain and Tall.” At one point, I think I had the first few pages memorized.
    3. I’m determined to finish “Dreams from My Father” before the end of the summer — I’ve been reading it for months now!

  14. I lived in a large town with an excellent library which I walked to for my weekly allotment of books. I think the bookmoblie visited the local nursing homes and the local Veteran’s Hospital, though.
    How about, “A Mad Tea Party” from, of course, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.
    I plan to read Steering by Starlight by Martha Beck this summer.
    Anxiously awaiting the publication of your new book!

  15. 1. Our town didn’t HAVE a bookmobile. What a rip-off. But I always entered the local library’s reading contest and I won once!
    2. I adored (and still do) “The Neverending Story” by Michael Ende
    3. I’m planning to read “Things I Learned About my Dad in Therapy” by Heather Armstrong/Dooce. Only 2 people in front of me on the hold list at the library!

  16. No bookmobiles for me. I used to beg my mother to drop me off at the library while she went to the grocery store, though. I was a whiny, clingy kid; I’m sure she was glad to be rid of me. That library was about the size of your average living room, and I almost always checked out what other people thought of as the most boring books they had.
    One of my very favorites as a child (besides the Chronicles of Narnia, which my husband and I later figured out we were checking out at the same time, from the same library) was The Secret Garden. Now that I’m a grown-up, I’m spending the rest of my summer reading books for my dissertation, starting with that classic page-turner, Martin Chuzzlewit.

  17. 1. I was a city girl with a small branch library right next door to my house. I still remember the day my grandmother brought me over there and the librarian told me I could take books out on her card…”The Red Shoes” was the first to go home with me. I would spend whole afternoons over there (and my mother could watch me from our dining room window to make sure I stayed put).
    2. Without a doubt, “A Wrinkle in Time”
    3. “Three Cups of Tea”
    Happy Blogiversary, Ann and Kay! And thank you so much!

  18. 1. A Bookmobile memory if you have one.
    Oh my god — I haven’t thought about the bookmobile in ages! I went to a small catholic elementary school in the 1960s, in a factory town in New England. My neighborhood actually had a tiny branch library that was open 3 days a week, and I went there often, especially in the summer. But the school didn’t have any type of library, so a few times a year the bookmobile would come to the school. I always loved those days. The idea of a traveling library just seemed awesome, and somehow the books from the bookmobile seemed more special than the ones I could get from the branch library any old time. The bookmobile visits were so far apart, though, that I always had trouble finding my books when it was time to renew them!
    2. The title of a favorite chapter book from your childhood or your child’s childhood.
    My hands down favorite book was A Little Princess, by Frances Hodgeson Burnett. I never had my own copy, but I checked it out from the library more than once, and spent hours imagining myself as the heroine, Sara Crewe.
    3. The title of a book you plan to read before the end of the summer of 2008.
    I’m working my way through the “Thursday Next” series by Jasper Fforde, a wildly imaginative series of books in which fiction exists as a parallel world, with some people (and fictional characters) able to pass back and forth between fiction and the “outland.” Right now, I’m reading “Something Rotten.”

  19. Ah, Bookmobiles! Your post made me go back and check the library system of my youth to see if they still have a bookmobile.
    1. A Bookmobile memory if you have one.
    I have many bookmobile memories: When I was 6, just after Kindergarten ended, I got my library card at the bookmobile that vistied our town (It stopped at Zeus Circle in front of the Hobe Sound Civic Center). Later on we got a branch library. It just wasn’t the same.
    My mother ended up working at libraries, once my sister and I were “old enough”. She got her start as a page at the main branch of the library then moved to a full time job on the bookmobile when we were in high school(this would have been in the mid-to-late 80’s.) I think it visited Indiantown, Port Salerno and Palm City in Martin County, Florida, when my mom worked there.
    2. The title of a favorite chapter book from your childhood or your child’s childhood.
    I recently found a copy of Little House in the Big Woods, that, according to the inscription I got for Christmas in 1979. I started reading it to my daughter and I think we made it through half a chapter before she lost interest. Maybe in a few years.
    3. The title of a book you plan to read before the end of the summer of 2008.
    I just checked out of the library “I feel bad about my neck” by Nora Ephron. It’s a small book, I think I can read it.

  20. The bookmobile didn’t stop in our neighborhood when I was young but I used to watch it going down Main St. to some other lucky kid’s neighborhood. Boy, was I jealous! My favorite childhood book is A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle. For some reason or other, my teachers in grades 4 and 5 both read us the same book and I loved it…both times. (Now that I think of it, though, what were they thinking, reading to us?! At that age, shouldn’t WE have been the ones reading?) I’m currently reading The Infinite Plan by Isabel Allende and hope that by the end of summer, I’ll have read one or all of the following: End of the Alphabet, Me and Mr. Darcy, and/or Love in the Time of Cholera. That said, I would happily shelve all 3 of these books to devote my full attention to a complete and thorough reading of MDK Outside the Lines. I’d even put my knitting down for THAT one!
    Thanks for the contest!!

  21. I have no bookmobile library memories but plenty about running (well, walking quickly) to the Nancy Drew books to get the next one and being disaapointed if I had read all of the ones that were currently there.
    That being said I loved The Witch of Blackbird Pond and From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler.
    I am going to finish Antony and Cleopatra by Colleen McCullough by the time my classes start in late August.

  22. I did not grow up in a town that had a Bookmobile, but I have vivid memories (and so does my 87-year-old mother, who often reminisces about this) of visiting our NJ shore town’s tiny library. The librarian was and old, skinny woman with a big lump on her wrist that jiggled when she handed you the library card to sign. As soon as I was old enough to print my name (4 or 5), I was able to take out 6 books a week. My mom would take me to that tiny library religiously, and after awhile, she would point out a book and I would yell “I read that already!” Eventually I guess I exhausted the little library’s inventory.
    A favorite chapter book that I remember is “Are You There God, It’s Me, Margaret.” Actually all of the Judy Blume books were favorites when I was a preteen.
    I just started “The Emperor’s Children” and will definitely finish it this summer.
    Happy Blogiversary! Your first book has recently inspired me to knit dishcloths–I’m looking forward to what the second book brings!

  23. Ok, I’ll delurk for a contest. ;)
    1. No Bookmobile memory, but my Mom took us to the regional library 10 miles away all the time. I loved to read and always came home with a stack of 15-20 books that I’d read in 3 weeks.
    2. Enchanter’s Wheel by Helen Oakley.
    3. The Valley of Horses by Jean Auel. Yes, I know it came out years ago. I’ve even read it before. I have almost no books (other than knitting) in this house and when I saw this for 25 cents at a garage sale I picked it up.

  24. 1 – Bookmobile memory – Although I lived within walking distance of our local library, I was always a little bit jealous of the kids who lived further out and got to visit the bookmobile. I couldn’t imagine anything more exciting than a library on wheels still a thrill a little bit at the idea. Bookmobile. Ooh la la!
    2 – My favourite chapter books were the Little House and Bobbsey Twin series. I read them over and over and over again.
    3 – My reading plan for the rest of the summer is to finish Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides ASAP (so good!) and move read Remembering the Bones by Frances Itani as quickly as possible after that. At the rate I’m going I’ll probably need something new to read (after RtB) by the time I go away next weekend. I’ll be scouring the comments for ideas!

  25. Two things I remember about 4th grade at Holly Avenue Elementary:
    1. Reading Mistress Masham’s Repose by T.H. White at my 4th grade teacher, Mrs. Dodge’s suggestion.
    2. Going to an assembly with the whole school where the subject was “not spitting over the railing at students walking on the sidewalk below.” After the assembly my best friend, Candy, dared me to spit over the railing right after she did.
    I did it…we had never even thought of it before!
    “She did it first” was not an excuse with Mrs. Dodge (but she didn’t send us to the principal). ; ]

  26. 1. Unfortunately I am a child of the ’80s and have no Bookmobile memories. I do, however, have amazingly fond memories of the summer reading programs at my local library that I’d participate in every year (I too am a sucker for a certificate). My most vivid memories of summer reading are those of spending the afternoons tucked in my room reading through my stack of library books after having spent the morning swimming. Something about the heat of the morning contrasting with the coolness of the afternoon has stuck in my brain and makes me so happy just thinking back on it.
    2. We had a series of chapter books about a family called “The Buttons” that I loved to read through. “The Buttons go to the zoo” was a favorite.
    3. I plan to read “My Sister’s Keeper” by the end of the summer.
    Great contest – I can’t wait to see the new book! So excited!

  27. 1. No bookmobile memories, but we went to the library every week. My brother and I went to the far end of the building where, in the children’s room, we would stay for hours. It smelled vaguely of chlorine (especially just outside because of the fountains), and that smell in the early evening still reminds me of the library and books.
    2. (Picking only one book from my childhood is very, very hard…) Little House in the Big Woods was one of my favorites…. Laura had the same name as me. She seemed to live a much more interesting life than me – except for the sunbonnets.
    3. The Thin Place (on reserve at my just-signed-up-for-because-I’m-new-to-the-neighborhood public library

  28. I lived one block away from the library, so no bookmobiles came to me. But living one block away was so awesome! I could cut through my friend’s yard and in through the back door of the library to shorten the trip. One early morning I took my usual shortcut and went in the back door. The cleaning lady was in there alone and yelled at me for scaring her– the library wasn’t even open yet! Let me tell you, she was not the only scared one. It took guts to ever use the back door again. I used to love checking out Happy Hollister books in those days. This summer I hope to lay hands on a library copy of Janet Evanovich’s Fearless Fourteen and read it on the beach. Happy 5th, and happy book launch!

  29. Oh YES! The Bookmobile…Friday evenings in the Hearns grocery parking lot…first place I was allowed to go on my bike off the street…first place I was allowed to ride my bike after dark(yes, with the banana seat, yes it was blue, had a big basket in the front and I added saddlebag baskets on either side of the back tire JUST for bookmobile trips! For some reason it was named Hot-chee Pot-chee (go figure)). Wonderful place in the late 50s…especially when we didn’t get “downtown” (Wilmington, Delaware) to the “big library” across from the Y where I took swimming lessons.
    And yes, ALL the Cherry Ames and the “other” nurse series by the same author Helen Wells (and unlike Judy, I figured out early on that blood makes me pass out…probably not nurse material!) and then I discovered NON-fiction and a whole world opened up to me! Good Times…thanks for bringing it up.
    Halfway through God Save the Fan by Will Leitch and looking forward to Flower Children by Maxine Swann about Harvard educated hippies raising kids in rural Pennsylvania in the 70s and 80s…and in the moments while the hands take a break from knitting…the technical information in Big Girl Knits is being poured over…

  30. I’m too young for the Bookmobile, but I always loved going to the library. Every summer my family went camping and there were lots of 8-hour days driving in the car…plenty of time for lots of reading :)
    My favorite book as a kid was Beezus and Ramona (Beverly Cleary). I plan to read Black House (Stephen King & Peter Straub) by the end of the summer.

  31. The bookmobile came to the edge of the park by our house when we lived in Morris Plains, NJ. I walked our pre-school daughter across the park to have the “bookmobile experience”, even though we went to the library several times a week. We were such reading geeks!
    Favorite childhood book: Now We Are Six, or anything Pooh related. I used to sit upstairs on the stair landing and read to myself.
    This summer I’m reading Julia Spencer-Flemming, and her Out of the Deep I Cry is next.

  32. I started Kindergarten in ’76. We had a book fair. I still have my children’s bible I got that day and read it to my kids now. I too would get in trouble for reading TOO MUCH. I still sacrifice a night’s sleep if life is just too much and I need to escape. I am reading Duchess by Midnight by Eloise James. When I am not reading historical romance, I am inhaling knitting books. Inspired To Knit is fabulous!!!

  33. Apparently, my small Iowa town was too small for a Bookmobile (or maybe it was before my time). But we did have an old Carnegie Library that had a very distinct, musty smell and ancient, mean librarians (who probably weren’t actually that mean). I spent my summers participating in the Summer Reading Program, and usually won or came close each year (I also had to be forced to go outside). Luckily the library was within walking distance, and I would carry the special library bag my grandma made me with my name appliqued to the outside and a little pocket for a library card. Or I would ride my pink Huffy inherited from my sister.
    My favorite books were the Little House on the Prairie books. Oh, I loved those. Or anything by Judy Blume. And I’ve always just had some against Nancy Drew. I just can’t put my finger on it…
    This summer’s reading highlight, so far, has been Animal, Vegetable, Miracle.

  34. Oh, I have Thinking About Memoir at home to read! Now I’m all looking forward to it.
    I am a 70’s child, and we had weekly trips to the library for books that I can’t always remember the exact titles of. One of my favorites was The Mouse and the Motorcycle, which became one of my son’s favorites, too.
    However, there was a bookmobile in Selma, Alabama (much more of a Carnegie kind of town than Natchez, Mississippi!) and a great joy of visiting my mother in the summer was riding my bike down dirt roads and short-cuts, past an old-time store like the one you described, to get to the bookmobile. I had read most of what they stocked–a lot of Nancy Drew, as I remember (I was a Trixie Belden girl)–but they also had Cherry Ames books, which I wasn’t supposed to read (because I would imagine I had the dread disease!) so I would sit in the bookmobile, talk to the librarian, and read the illicit Cherry Ames, Registered Nurse!
    What will I read this summer? Well, the memoir book, and Across Five Aprils, plus I finally read Water for Elephants, if that counts. Weekly trips to the library are still among my favorite things, and this summer we are bike-riding to the library (it’s the triathlon for smart people–bike to library & swimming pool!).

  35. I grew up in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada during the 50’s & 60’s. And, yes – we did have Bookmobiles here, too! (Although I seemed to have some kind of speech impediment that only let me pronounce it, “Bookmookbile”.) I actually thought I’d actually died & gone to actual heaven when the Bookmookbile came to my neighbourhood. It was all dark & mysterious inside, with post-war linoleum & dark wood fittings that were more beautiful to me than any famous cathedral. It had a special “bookish” smell that thrilled me. We were allowed 3 books at a time, & it took me
    f-o-r-e-v-e-r to choose them. I remember my Mum reading me the 1st “Heidi”, then the first half of the 2nd one, “Heidi Grows Up”, then I was able to read the 2nd half all by myself, & the 3rd one, “Heidi’s Children”. I still own all 3 books. My 3 weeks’ holidays start soon, & I plan on reading “The Story of my Life”, by Helen Keller. Oh, & I forgot to mention – I work part-time as a librarian, now!

  36. No bookmobiles where I grew up (too fancy or something like that). My childhood favorites are the Little House books (Almonzo grew up near me! His house was so small in real life!), Anne of Green Gables, and the Ramona Quimby books. I just moved to Portland, and need to re-read those this summer, since she’s a local gal.
    And Eat, Pray, Love and Animal, Vegetable, Miracle. There’s a theme!

  37. Oh, gosh! I forgot to wish you ladies, “Happy 5th Blogiversary”! I’ve been reading your blog for a couple of years, now, & just love it!

  38. No bookmobile memories, but I do have fond memories of afternoons spent at the little library branch a few miles from my house.
    Favorite childhood chapter book – all things Roald Dahl
    Book to read this summer – Labyrinth

  39. I lived out in the boonies in the Thumb area of Michigan. It was farm country and farmers did not have time to read in the summer. I was another one of those kids who had to be forced to put her book down and go outside, luckily Mom kept me regularly supplied with library books to satisfy my addiction and I had glasses that were usually needing repair, too. My favorite books were Little Women and Anne of Green Gables. I wanted to dye my hair green just like Anne’s and Mom had to talk me out of it. The book I plan to read this summer is “When Evil Came to Good Hart” by Mardi Link. It is the true story of the murder of an entire family in Northern Michigan which happened in 1968 when I was a little girl.
    Holly

  40. I loved the Bookmobile! It came to our small school every once in a while, but I don’t remember a set schedule. It looked exactly like the book mobile in your picture, and I remember it really didn’t have a whole lot of books. It always made my day when it showed up, because we didn’t have a lot of books at my school, just a few shelves that I had read over and over and over. I only remember one book that I checked out from the bookmobile, though. It was titled Red Letter Days. I thought it was The Scarlet Letter. Needless to say, it wasn’t. I doubt that they would have let a 5th grader check out the Scarlet Letter, back then.
    I am reading the science fiction novel Lillith’s Brood by Octavia E. Butler. I have read the first two chapters so far, it is really good. I was worried from the back cover that it was going to be one of those books where the author thinks he/she is smarter than everyone else and the book is horribly boring. So far, that hasn’t been the case, I’m very pleased!

  41. 1. Our bookmobile had an inadequate number of children’s books, but I remember spending a week of daytime at our public library when I was 10 (by myself, no less). I asked my mother if I could go there while she worked nearby, and she agreed. Nobody asked me what I was doing by myself, surprisingly. Needless to say, I was in heaven.
    2. Danny, Champion of the World.
    3. Having a baby next week…I hold no aspirations for any book finishing this summer.

  42. No bookmobile stories, alas, since I lived in the suburbs as a child and we had a well-stocked library.
    The chapter book I read most as a child (and still occasionally pick up now that I’m a grownup) was Anne of Green Gables, by LM Montgomery. I plan on reading it to my daughter soon.
    I’ve read a pile of books already this summer, but I plan on getting around to Helen of Troy, by Margaret George. Fluffy reading, but physically heavy!

  43. Happy Blogiversasry!
    1) No bookmobile in our town — just a small library we went to *all* the time.
    2) One of my favorite chapter books was _James and the Giant Peach_ and other Roald Dahl books.
    3) I’m almost done with the insightful and amazing _Omnivore’s Dilemma_.

  44. Nothing like books in the summer! My earliest memory of Flushing, New York is walking with Mom to the branch library. Queens has good branches and a subway. In high school they would bus us to Lincoln Center for opera and such, and we had time to run into the public library branch there to check out the score (this was before supertitles). All free! My favorite chapter book from childhood was not from the library, though, but in the Cherry Ames series. I might have had them all. I remember especially when she was a private duty nurse for the concert pianist with angina, and got into a suspect’s apartment building by buying a bouquet of flowers and pretending to be delivering them. This summer I’d like to start (and maybe finish) Long Walk to Freedom by Nelson Mandela. Thanks, gals, for your wonderful ideas and inspiration (and good reading and writing), and happy anniversary!

  45. 1. In the mid 1950’s my family lived in Chicago near Kelvyn Park. My memory says the (at that time) local library branch was located in a nearby park district field house (possibly Kosciuscko Park) that burned down (?). So, until it was rebuilt, a bookmobile came around once a week and stopped a block or so away on Diversey. I don’t remember much of it except getting on at the back end and walking through and getting off at the front end. It was very cramped. I think we could only get one or two books at a time. We moved to Jefferson Park not long after, I guess. That library branch was in a store front.
    2. One of my favorite books was Eloise Jarvis McGraw’s “Mara, Daughter of the Nile”. It certainly piqued an interest in Egypt,
    3. which leads to one of the many books I hope to finish this summer, P.C. Doherty’s “The Poisoner of Ptah”

  46. Bookmobile Memory: narrow aisles, the smell of old books. Dame Edna glasses on the librarian.
    2. Favorite Chapter Book of Childhood: Milly Molly Mandy (I was a very good little girl until the 60’s got hold of me).
    3. Summer 2008 book to read: Your Hands Can Heal You (it’s a book on pranic healing — I guess the 60’s aren’t quite done with me yet…).
    I’m so looking forward to your new book!

  47. 1. I have no Bookmobile memories. But we did go to library once a week in the summer. The library showed filmstrips of old cartoons and (very abridged) Disney movies from days-gone-by. (I was a kid in the 80s, so old films were things like the original Freaky Friday with Jodie Foster.) After the movie was done, the kids-we-tried-not-to-sit-next-to-because-they-wiggled-and-pushed-and-picked-their-noses would all run out of the library to the playground and we serious scholars would go find a book to check out, preferably by Judy Blume. In later years, Sweet Valley High ruled, but we were past the filmstrips by then. I bet they upgraded to videocassette.
    2. I remember reading and re-reading Greenwitch by Susan Cooper when I was in third grade. The librarian asked me (after I had checked it out about five times) if I’d like to try something else since this one was taking so long. Dumb broad! I had read it five times by then! If she had been smart, she would have alerted me to the fact that the book was one of a series: “The Dark is Rising.” I bet they didn’t have the rest of them or I think I would have seen them. (Side note: I just read the whole series, as did my husband and two of my four children. They’re still good.)
    3. I’m planning to read “Twilight” by Stephenie Meyers before the end of the summer. My friend, her daughter, and my two oldest daughters have all read the series and the new book is coming out next week. Gotta jump on the bandwagon! (Or bookwagon, as it may be.)

  48. I remember seeing the Bookmobile at our branch library. Since our branch was walking distance from our house (it felt like miles with my six books each week), we never got to visit the library on wheels. My favorite chapter books when very young were Mrs. Piggle Wiggle. Remember the boy who wouldn’t clean his room, and ended up locked inside by all the toys? His mother lifted up a peanut butter sandwich and the garden hose on a rake to his second floor window so he could eat. Loved them! One (of many) books I want to read this summer is The Path Between the Seas by David McCullough.

  49. 1. My rural mountain town didn’t have a bus, traffic lights, or a bookmobie, but we had a servicable library where I could frequently be found. It helped that it was in the courthouse where my dad served as County Sheriff. :)
    2. Two favorites that I remember are The Phantom Tollbooth, which inspired imagination and creativity like nobody’s business, and Johnny Tremaine, which did more for my knowledge of the American Revolution than any schoolbook of the time.
    3. I’m currently reading The Shack by William P. Young, which I highly recommend for a different take on theology. I’ve also started Ann Rule’s Too Late to Say Goodbye. I have a love of Ann’s true crime storytelling. :)

  50. No bookmobiles for this urban girl. I grew up in San Francisco, with the library only two blocks away. My sister and I could walk there along. I did spend some summers in Portland, OR where the library was much further away and my stepmother was amazing about taking us regularly. I still remember EXACTLY what the children’s room looked like! And I remember the book reading competitions, trying to get my numbers really, REALLY high, watching the train or fish or whoknowswhat move around the the library walls. I’m proud to say my 8 year old nephew is following in my footsteps.
    Some of the books I remember from that time are Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh, James and the Giant Peach, The Borrowers and A Little Princess.
    As for this summer, I’ve pulled out some Chick Lit for quick reads (I read Barbara Delinsky’s new book A Family Tree from cover to cover one evening.) As for the big guns books, I’m finally reading Edward Rutherford’s book on Ireland, The Princes of Ireland, to be followed by The Rebels of Ireland. I have enjoyed all his previous books so I’m really happy to finally be getting to these.

  51. 1. Sadly, the book mobile wasn’t a part of my childhood in the 80’s. I am terribly jealous of those who had access to them (and seersucker shorts). I did, however have a pink Schwinn banana seat bike! We always stocked up at the well air conditioned public library before embarking on our summer road trips to Maine.
    2. My favorite chapter books were from L Frank Baum. The Marvelous Land of OZ being my absolute favorite.
    3. This summer I have Mother Night by Kurt Vonnegut on my nightstand.

  52. Ahhh, same vintage Bookmobile… but my Sting-Ray was sparkly green, and a hand-me-down from my uber-cool older brother. The bookmobile would come to the Winn-Dixie parking lot once a week, and was a haven for me (and my mom), since I had been banished from the main library (Leon County Library, Tallahasse, FL) for running up the huge central staircase that branched to the right and left from a central landing halfway up, running around the upstairs balcony, and then sliding down the banister opposite the side I’d run up. The bookmobile librarian was much kinder than the guy who would yell and chase me around the balcony downtown, and would always have a few books set aside that she thought I’d like. It certainly saved face for my mom, too, since a proper Southern lady-in-training I was definitely NOT. I later worked in a bookstore in Ohio that had an old bookmobile converted into a mobile bookstore, but the thing was constantly breaking down out in the hinterlands, and was phased out.

  53. No bookmobiles for us – my mum’s a librarian, so we managed weekly trips to the library – or twice a week, if we were good!
    I loved all the Little House books when I was small. Laura Ingalls Wilder had great hair (aspirational), sisters (so much better than smelly brothers!), and a great name (the clincher).
    This summer (well, this winter-in-June-July-and-August in Dublin, the city of eternal rain) I plan to re-read Ms Ingalls’ series, perhaps including the cookbook (sure to entertain).

  54. We didn’t have a Bookmobile, but our little small town library had a very similar program. My favorite books as a child were anything by Beverly Cleary, especially Henry and Ribsy. I also liked the Amelia Bedelia books. I just started reading Becoming Jane Austen. I sure hope I’ve finished it by the end of the summer!

  55. Oh, I used to love, love, love the bookmobile. It was a great occasion when it showed up. I read constantly, still would if I could… but I can’t, so I won’t. ;0)
    I’m currently reading Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett. A little behind the times, but I’m getting there!

  56. Oops… got so wrapped up in memory that I forgot to mention the second point in addition to the first one above… I plan to read (and hopefully finish) “Friday Night Knitting Club” on the train to Florida next week…

  57. 1. No bookmobile, but I did participate in a summer reading contest to raise money for Multiple Sclerosis when I was 7. My aunt was diagnosed in 1979. I read dozens of books, including Nancy Drews and Trixie Beldens, that summer. I won strange things and raised a nice pot of money. That aunt died on my birthday this year–she was diagnosed long before there were decent (if really any) treatments available.
    2. The Westing Game, Ellen Raskin–one of my life favorites.
    3. William S. Burroughs’ Naked Lunch–one of the original Beats writing about heroin addiction

  58. We always drove down to the Library to take out stacks of books that would sprawl across the backseat on the way home.
    My childhood idea of the Bookmobile: move in, stay for the ride.
    Childhood favorite: A Little Princess
    I plan to read: The Great Gatsby
    thanks for the bloggy inspiration, always.

  59. We always drove down to the Library to take out stacks of books that would sprawl across the backseat on the way home.
    My childhood idea of the Bookmobile: move in, stay for the ride.
    Childhood favorite: A Little Princess
    I plan to read: The Great Gatsby
    thanks for the bloggy inspiration, always.

  60. 1/ The book mobile visited once when we were in a very small town. I had already read through the school library, and the childrens’ section of the local library. The lack of anything novel in the bookmobile’s offerings may have been what lead my parents to throw up their hands and agree that ten was not too young to start working through the adult section of the library.
    2/ When I was eight, my mother left me for the afternoon at my grandmother’s, with a copy of one of her favourite books from her childhood – A Little Princess, by Frances Hodgson Burnett, author of The Secret Garden. She was furious when she came back later and I’d already torn through it, eager to find out how it ended. We have never seen eye to eye on whether it’s better to linger and savour, or devour at high speed. I still love the book.
    3/ I’m working my way through the Dresden Files series. It’s pure fluff, but with the occasional literary allusion thrown in to make everything all better. I hope to read book six within the next week so I can hand it off to someone else whom I accidentally hooked on the series.

  61. Summer reading memories…judy blume, the tee pee and the hawk. how could they possibly fit together?? Some kids have tents in their back yard, well, for some reason, we had a tee pee made of thick vinyl and the thing was big! (note to self, ask dad where he got that thing and why?) we easily fit 4 or 5 us us medium age, not quite teen, girls in there. i seem to think we were maybe we were entering 5th grade. anyways, we took Judy Blume’s “Are you there god, it’s me Margaret” out to the tent to find out about worldly things. problem is we were scared becase a hawk had taken up residence in our yard that summer, very cool but ubberscary at night. we actually thought that that bird could carry us away. Really worldly girls who thought that a hawk could carry them off!!! it cracks me up to think we thought we were old enough to learn about “girl things” but young enough to think that we’d fly away at the mercy of a bird!!!
    And, since it is summer, i will read a kid book, that big Harry Potter 7 from last year. my oldest, twins age 8.5, have read 1 and 2 and are itching to procede so i need to beat them!!!
    happy anniv! love your blog and knitting!!

  62. 1. Bookmobiles didn’t operate in the various towns I lived in as a child but I had one encounter during a family reunion in Louisiana. My cousins (who weren’t great readers) lived in a very small community, the type where amenities are spread out among several towns – one has the post office, another the gas station, another the school, and so on – so the bookmobile was the only library available to them. Knowing my love of books they suggested I visit the bookmobile with them. A long dusty walk down a narrow macadamed country highway (I remember when it was dirt) to the gas station in town then waiting in the shade with the owner, sipping grape Nehi soda out of glass bottles then putting the empties in wooden crates next to the vending machine. I don’t remember the look of the mobile that much but I can still recall the super-heated and mildewy smell inside. The book my cousin checked out for me had moldy flyspecks on its softly crumbling pages but I would have checked out all of the books if we could have lugged them back to the farm. I don’t remember the title but I know it was at least from the 1920s. It’s funny that people say they are too young for bookmobiles — I live in Denver and it has a bookmobile so I know they are still around.
    2. The first chapter book I read was A Wrinkle in Time (actually we read it as a family when I was in second grade; my sister, mother and I would take turns reading it out loud to each other). I loved Nancy Drew but my favorite book was Harriet the Spy, I re-read it every few years and still love it.
    3. On my list for this summer is Under the Banner of Heaven by Jon Krakauer. Also, The Third Policeman by Flann O’Brien and When You are Engulfed in Flames by David Sedaris (actually I’ll be listening to that one, he’s fun to read but he’s really fun to hear).

  63. 1. No bookmobile. I lived in Suburbia and frequented the public library. The children’s room was in the basement, with easily scrubbed child-sized chairs and tables. By the time I reached junior high, I was sneaking onto the adult floor where there were fat overstuffed chairs. I figured as long as I was quiet and tucked away in a corner, the librarians would let me stay. And they did! When I turned 16, I landed a job in the library, as a “page”. One of my tasks was to “read the shelves” – look for books that were shelved out of order. At night I drifted off to sleep with the Dewey Decimal System dancing in my head.
    2. I was horse crazy, and read all the Black Stallion books. I was also a big fan of Marguerite Henry – I even have a signed copy of “Mustang”. (What is a “chapter book”?)
    3. “Thinking About Memoir” – thanks for the title!

  64. Ah, the bookmobile! Ours came to the parking lot of a nearby school (not ours), and was there for an hour on Friday mornings. We HAD TO BE ON TIME, so that I could use that full hour. We always had a craft to do (to keep everyone from being in the bookmobile at once, I believe), and my brother and sister would often end up on the playground (they weren’t as big of readers). It was always tough when the bookmobile came – we had a limit of 10 books, if I remember correctly, and those had to last us until the next Friday. By the end of the summer, I was reading anything they had that I hadn’t already read! I loved the bookmobile – loved the smell, loved the cramped little space and the books on the walls of the truck. Love.
    My favorite chapter books would have to be Anne of Green Gables and the Little House books. I was lucky enough to have my own copies of those, so I could read them over and over again.
    Thanks for the great memories! I miss the bookmobile – going to the branch library that is very close is nice, but it just isn’t the same, ya know?

  65. 1. I lived near, and later in, a tiny town of 585 souls in southern MN in the 50s and early 60s. Our library was one 10′-long wall of the post office. The librarian, old as dirt, was only there sporadically. If I wanted to check out a book when she wasn’t there, I printed my name carefully on the card, left it on the desk, and took the book home. Such trust in those days.
    The bookmobile came every Tuesday (or was it Thursday?), and once we moved into town when I was 10, I was there every single week. I can still see the van parked in front of the post office and feel myself carefully exiting it down the steps with an eagerly anticipated copy of Charlotte’s Web in my hand. Heaven for the next day or so that it took me to read it, then back to eager anticipation until next Tuesday (or Thursday).
    2. My favorite chapter book of all time (at the time) was A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle. It was perhaps my first introduction to relativity and the space-time continuum, things that have fascinated me ever since. Even though my brain boggles and refuses to grok the concept fully.
    3. I must finish Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel Marcia Marquez by 6:30 pm next Monday for my book club. Reading is a constant in my life, but oh, how far I have come since the days of the bookmobile and Charlotte and Wilbur ;-)

  66. I feel as though I have missed an important part of my childhood by not having a bookmobile. We lived in the country and a trip to the library was a treat. I would always check out the maximum number of books I could and devour them before our visit the next week. I can remember being really little and sturggling to carry 10 books down the flight of stairs from the children’s section in the old library.
    A favorite book from my childhood: Misty of Chincoteague. I loved that book with a passion. I must have read it every summer.
    One I plan to finish before the end of the summer: Through a Glass Darkly. I think I have another 200 pages or so and I’m done.

  67. I remember reading about Bookmobiles in my Junior Scholastic Magazine but there was none in my town. We did have a town library and I stillremember the musty smell of the place. One of my favorite books as a child was “Half Magic” by Edgar Eager about a family of four kids who find a magic coin one summer. It’s a magic coin that grants a wish, but only half of it! Now, more than four and a half decades later,I’d like to finish “The
    Nanny Diaries” before this summer is over.

  68. My only bookmobile memory was having to get a note from my mom to be allowed to check out ‘Go Ask Alice’. We were doing reports on drugs in school, it really was not on my choice of books list.
    My favorite chapter book from that time was probably Ballet Shoes, but I also loves the Little House books, and the All of a Kind Family books, and the Oz series.
    For this summer, I am trying to get through Children of the Hurin. I think that is more of a wintertime, rainy Saturday book. I may have better luck getting through Brisingr, but it doesn’t release until the 20th of September, so it could be a challenge.

  69. There was not a bookmobile that I recall, growing up. However, I do fondly remember the library at my kindergarten school. It was not very big, but it had the wonderful books about historical people, books about George Washington and Abe Lincoln, but my favorite was the book about Anne Sullivan. I checked out this book every chance I got and I believe I wore it out. :) It was nothing fancy, the drawings were very cartoon-ish, but I just loved reading about Anne Sullivan and Helen Keller. I was fascinated about their story and how a person who couldn’t see or hear could learn to communicate and even speak. Incredible!
    One of my favorite children’s book is Richard Scary’s What Do People Do All Day.
    As far as reading this summer…well, I would like to say The Audacity of Hope by Barack Obama or even finally plow through Angels & Demons by Dan Brown. But I’ll be honest…I prefer knitting over reading. I just don’t have enough time in one day. Would an InStyle magazine or Anthropologie catalog or Cooks Illustrated magazine count?

  70. I grew up in a town of 500 people. Even there, we had the bookmobile come. Ours was really nice though. It had the same hushed feeling as the regular library in the next town. I loved it.
    My favorite chapter book was Mandy by Julie (Andrews) Edwards. My girls loved it too!!!
    What am I going to read this summer??? I’m such a knitting addict this summer that my reading has really suffered. I’m reading a lot of homeschooling material, because I’m going that route with #4 of 5 kids. Yikes!!!

  71. 1. No Bookmobile memory, but my mom did have to put her purse in lockdown when a Book Fair was coming up at the Elementary School, to make sure that I didn’t steal a $20 and come home with a huge pile. I used to agonize over how to narrow down my huge list of wanted books to what I could afford to get…
    2. I loved “The Borrowers” when I was younger, then all the Nancy Drews, then I really fell in love with “The Westing Game”.
    3. Many, I’m sure, but I have to read “The Thirteenth Tale” for book group next month, so we’ll say that one.
    I’m looking forward to the new book – loved the last one!

  72. We didn’t have a bookmobile in our area, but we had a small, dank, dark house-turned-library-branch near my house that I walked to weekly over the summer to get my books. I was also of the can’t go outside and play because I’m reading type and I remember the first summer when I moved to the town I call my hometown, the one with the house/library branch.
    It was only two weeks until the end of summer and we had just moved into the neighborhood. Some neighbor kids and their mom took me over to the library and that’s when I found out that *gasp* they were having a summer reading program! I could get a certificate! I could get prizes! All for reading books, which I would have done anyway.
    The problem, as the librarian explained to me, was that you had to read 15 books over the course of the summer to get the certificate and I only had two weeks left. I surely couldn’t make it.
    Well, let me tell you! I started by writing up the book report for 8 of the books I had already read that summer, books that were in the library branch so I was allowed to count them. Then, I took five books home that day and read them all in a week. I was a fast reader :) Then, I repeated the process with five more books the second week and on the last day of the program, I gleefully turned in my EIGHTEEN book reviews and smugly took my certificate from the impressed librarian :)
    I still have it to this day :)
    It is too hard to pick just one book from my childhood, so I’ll list a few that I read that summer. Bunnicula, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator, Dancing shoes, Skating Shoes, Golden Daffodils, Alice in Wonderland and Oscar Lobster’s Fair Exchange.
    Currently, I’m reading The Family Tree by Sherri S. Tepper. It’s one of my all-time favorite books and I hadn’t read it in a year or two and decided to pick it up and revisit my friends in the story. I’m anxiously awaiting the next book in the Outlander Series, which I had heard rumor that it would be out by September. I’m not sure if that’s actually gonna happen. I also keep meaning to read The DaVinci Code. I loved the movie, but I never read the book because I got pressy and book-snobbish and thought, any book that is so popular must not really be that good. *eyeroll* Yes, I will read it soon :)

  73. My town didn’t have a bookmobile, but I’d like to give a shout-out to the very best elementary school librarian in the U.S. of A., Mr. Whinam. He was the master of the “to be continued.” He could cold-heartedly stop reading just as Danny’s father was about to reveal his fantastic and tantalizing secret pheasant-hunting trick or within sentences of Ms. Trenchbull fainting in Miss Honey’s classroom. He just pretty much rocked my thirsty-for-books 10-year-old world. So, in honor of Mr. W., (1) Matilda gets top honors as my favorite book.
    And I’m smack dab in the middle of (2) The Odyssey at the moment because I’m headed to the Greek islands in a few weeks and you know what they say about those who forget history being doomed to face Cyclopses or whatever.
    Happy Blogoversary Ann and Kay! Many happy returns!
    P.S. Kay, way to rock the bluebook reference. You can take the girl out the AG’s office . . .

  74. 1. No Bookmobile since we had a public library near us but I remember walking with my sisters along a bakingly-hot road in the summer (Willingdon Ave in Burnaby) with the cars rushing by, to the library and then tromping on the same road home with our knuckles dragging on the ground because we had the maximum number of books we were allowed to borrow, maybe 15 each.
    2. Swiss Family Robinson, because I love the fact that they rode emus.
    3. The Knitter’s Book of Yarn by Clara Parkes

  75. I grew up in a suburb without a bookmobile. I remember going to the library several times a week in the summer- my mom had a rule- the number of books you could check out at one time corresponded to your age. It kept lost books to a minimum but made trips to the library much more frequent (which was fine by me!).
    My two favorite books growing up were The Secret Garden and The Ordinary Princess, by M.M. Kaye. Both are a delight, even now I love reading them.
    I plan on reading A Tree Grows in Brooklyn next, which I’ve somehow missed up to this point. Three Cups of Tea is next up for my book club, so I’ll be reading that as well.

  76. The bookmobile didn’t come during the summer, but every two weeks during the school year as our 4 room, 8 grade school didn’t have it’s own library. We were allowed to take out one book at a time. Mine was usually finished by early evening the same day. Summer was when I’d spend time with my grandparents who lived in a larger town with the library two long blocks to the north. I’d be there when the doors opened for an armful of books and often back just before closing for a couple more. I still love to read.
    As for a childhood chapter books, I can think of several that I loved. Robert Heinlein’s “Star Beast”, my introduction to science fiction; Mother West Wind’s Children, by Thornton W Burgess; & The Black Stallion series by Walter Farley.
    Right now, I’m reading Dale Brown’s “Shadow Command”. Long list of previous reads on my blog.

  77. Brilliant bloggers must be on parallel tracks — see what Chelle came up with here: http://necessarychocolate.typepad.com/necessary_chocolate/2008/06/read-for-fun-summer-2008.html
    Necessary Chocolate: Read for Fun: Summer 2008

  78. 1. I’m a child of the 80’s, and my town was the county seat of government so we had a great library with a wonderful children’s librarian…I still remember the way the machine sounded when it “read” my library card and imprinted my info from the metal tag onto the book loan card, “THUNKTHWUMP”…
    2. My favorite books were anything about horses…especially Marguerite Henry and the Walter Farley series “The Black Stallion”. I think my best friend and I read all of them!
    3. I am trying to finish reading “1776” by David McCullough so I can start his biography of John Adams…but that’s only if I can keep myself from getting “distracted” by any new knitting books for the rest of the summer!
    I enjoy your blog, ladies, and I just finished reading and getting a new dose of inspiration MDK-style from your first book, and I can’t wait to get my hands on book #2!

  79. HAD THERE BEEN a bookmobile when I was growing up, I would have loved it like … well, something close to an eternal savior. The local library trips with my mom are wonderful memories, but an honest-to-God bookmobile… eeps!
    Favorite Chapter-Book from childhood: Tossup between The Westing Game and Matilda.
    Books to be read by the end of summer: Seeing (sequel to Blindness — first time read), Pride and Prejudice (second time read — I didn’t adequately appreciate it in tenth grade!)

  80. Oh, how I LOVED the Bookmobile. We were lucky enough to have a Carnegie Library in Conneaut, OH where I grew up, and the Carnegie Library had a bookmobile that would come to the parking lot at the corner of Amboy and West Main Roads, and I would nearly die getting there. I had bags of books to return and bags of books that I wanted to bring home. Every Nancy Drew, from _The Secret of the Old Clock_ to _The Mystery of Crocodile Island_; all the Judy Blumes, until my mom decided that they were talking about things that I didn’t need to know about, everything about ballet (I wasn’t a ballerina and never would be, but that didn’t stop my longing for them), a book on doll making, and a couple of Bobsy Twins books. I averaged 2 to 3 books a week, between weeding the humungous garden, gathering veggies, bike riding with friends, or the trips to the beach.
    A book that I’m planning on reading before the end of the summer is Little Earthquakes by Jennifer Weiner – I love her writing and this will be the 3rd time I’ve read this book. I also want to reread Snow Flower and the Secret Fan again, and the newest JD Robb, and then the newest Janet Evanovich book. I’m a bookworm by heart.
    Kay, thanks for evoking the memories. I miss the aqua colored bookmobile, with the smell of old paperbacks, sweat, and exhaust.

  81. I don’t have Bookmobile memories, but I have wonderful memories of going to the coolest public library that I have ever found (this was the ’60’s). I got my own library card when I was 6 and was allowed to walk to the library by myself (library was only 3 blocks from my house). For a small town this library was amazingly well stocked and it occupied part of the town’s Community Center, which was built in the twenties, in that era’s high-flown Gothic/Tudor style. So there were fireplaces in the children’s room, a gallery level above the main room, odd little windows looking out into the grounds and everywhere there were bookshelves full of books. I was allowed to check out books every week (most of them were read by Sunday) and when my brother and sisters got older, we would all troop up there and check out books after school on Fridays.
    Favorite chapter book: Madeline L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time.
    Planning to read this summer: Corelli’s Mandolin

  82. The bookmobile is one of my favorite childhood memories! We lived 12 miles from a small town in rural eastern Washington State, and I thrilled to the sound of the bookmobile loudspeaker as it trundled up our long gravel driveway every couple of weeks during summer vacation. My dad was an orchardist, so we didn’t go anywhere during the growing season; at the end of each summer, back in school, when kids were asked to tell the highlights of their summer vacations, the bookmobile and the number of books I read over the summer were my story. I remember the 10 book drive, too; I think I met that in two weeks! Or perhaps a month. Hooray for libraries! “Libraries will get you through times of no money better than money will get you through times of no libraries.”
    Two favorite chapter books leapt to mind first: “The Secret Garden” by Frances Hodgson Burnett and “An Old-Fashioned Girl” by Louisa May Alcott. Then, of course, there was also any book by Marguerite Henry. You’ve inspired me to reserve “Justin Morgan Had a Horse” from the library!
    Right now, I’m reading “The Various Haunts of Men,” a mystery by Susan Hill; next, I plan to read “A Perfect Red” by Amy Butler Greenfield, which is the history of cochineal, the red dye used in Mexico that created a sensation in Europe in the 1500s.
    Sadly, I haven’t mastered the technique of reading while knitting. That would be paradise doubled!

  83. 1. No bookmobile in the little town in Florida where I lived.
    2. The Secret Garden was a favorite. I still love to read anything about England.
    3. My name is on the list at the library to read Janet Evanovich’s Fearless Fourteen. I’m hoping I’ll get it before the summer is over.

  84. My childhood was too urban for a mobile library but when we first moved to this house it used to come on a Thursday. The route has changed and now it calls every two weeks. Over the summer I may take my son to catch up with the library on wheels, he’s never seen one and I’ve never been in one.
    Thank you for the idea.

  85. 1) No bookmobile, but I used to spend a lot of time at the nearby library. A fair share of it sitting in the back of the stacks of the adult section, reading all the Kinsey and other adult sex education stuff and waiting to get caught.
    2) Charlotte’s Web is my favourite childhood chapter book. No contest. I wore my copy OUT.
    3) I plan to read Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood this summer.
    By the way, who let Wednesday Addams into this last pic? That is one scarey, sneaky, sly-looking little girl.
    Thanks for such a fun post! I used to LOVE the library.

  86. 1. I remember being so jealous of kids who got to use the bookmoblie. It looked fun.
    2. I loved reading The Bobbsey Twins
    3. I will read Savage Garden, by Mark Mills.

  87. Boy, do I ever have bookmobile memories! Our bookmobile came to the parking lot of the public school in the summer. We had a libray in town, but that was too far for some to get to and too small to have all the best books. My favorite series from childhood was the Trixie Belden books – the one I enjoyed the most Trixie Belden and the Red Trailer Mystery. I remember how much I liked it and we’re talking 40+ years, folks!! Trixie and her friend Honey was totally my heroines!
    I plan to read Debbie MacComber’s Twenty Wishes before summer ends, as she hooked me with those knitterly characters on Blossom Street.

  88. I never had a Bookmobile growing up, but I practically LIVED at the library in summer. I would bring home stacks of books half as big as me, and I did every summer reading club there was. Collecting star stickers on a card shaped like a baseball mitt, or a crown, or a balloon, was an obsession, and I treasured the crappy little toys and gift certificates they earned me as if they were solid gold.
    One of my favorite books from one of those summers, one that stuck with me for years and years, was The Light Princess by George McDonald.
    This is a princess who was robbed at her christening of her gravity, both literal and figurative. She floats if not tethered down and finds everything hysterical. The only time when she calms down is when she’s swimming, which is when she meets the man who falls in love with her.
    He agrees to give up his life to block the hole that her favorite swimming lake is draining out of, but she has to be there to watch it as the rising water slowly covers him. Once it covers his head, she panics and pulls him out. This gives her her gravity back.
    The full text is online, here: http://www.johannesen.com/LightPrincessComplete.htm
    Before the end of the summer I plan to read “When You Are Engulfed In Flames” by David Sedaris.

  89. 1) No bookmobile!
    2) I loved Alice in Wonderland most (I think) of all the books I read.
    3)I am re-reading Vanity Fair, and will finish before September (I declare)!

  90. Cool contest!
    2) Over Sea and Under Stone by Susan Cooper
    3) Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norell by Susanna Clarke

  91. I also didn’t have a bookmobile, but I read the entire collections of multiple small military-base libraries. The first chapter book I remember reading on my own was Heidi, found in my grandmother’s attic (I still have that copy, falling apart as it is). Favorites include A Wrinkle in Time, The Witch of Blackbird Pond, and The Giver, as well as the Enchanted forest chronicles by Patricia C. Wrede. My current aspiration for this summer is to read the new Naomi Novik book (which I just realized was released).. which is another great young adult series featuring the Napoleonic wars, with dragons. (some of us never grow out of good children’s fiction!) Alas, I need to finish my non-fiction commuter books and wrest the new book from the husband first.

  92. Will one of the prizes also involve seeing a photo of you with your seersucker applique short/top outfit?
    I grew up in a large city, and I have only one memory of a book mobile. It’s very hazy as I must have been very young, but I mostly remember being blown away by the fact the the truck contained a library (and in my eyes, all libraries had all the books in the world, so this was quite breathtaking to me).
    My favorite books were from the Dark is Rising series. I read them over and over again.
    The summer I’d like to read the Savage Detectives by Roberto Bolano. So far I seem to be reading lots of Elizabeth Zimmerman and Maggie Ringhetti, and I don’t think that counts as summer reading…

  93. Oh the bookmobile! In the late 80’s,in a rural Ohio village (not big enough to be a “town”, the official title was “village”!), the bookmobile came in October. The first month of school the teacher would pass around the catalog, which to me, a voracious new reader, seemed like the best idea for a magazine EVER! The catalog had pictures of the books we could buy, with a short description of the story, divided by “reading level”. I didn’t believe in reading levels and wanted to read all the 6th grade books right NOW! I would take the catalog home, lay on bed and pore over it (better than a Tiger Beat!), circling all the good ones. After a few days of circling, starring and numbering in order of priority (we couldn’t afford the whole 6th grade collection, so I had to make do with $20), I would pass it off to my mom, who would approve (or, horrors, deny) my choices. No scary books, no “teen” books, definitely NO Judy Blume, nothing that would include “language” or any hint of a doubt in God, Christianity and “holy living”.
    So I read a looot of Anne of Greene Gables – all 7 books before 5th grade. In 6th grade I started on Jeannette Oke’s “Love Comes Softly” series and discussed it with my 26 year old aunt.
    As for this summer? I have “The Self-Sufficient Life” and “Intertwined” for non-fiction and “Good Omens” by Neil Gaimon for fiction.

  94. Well we didn’t have a bookmobile when i was a kid but I had my grandma. Almost every week she would take me during the summer. Boy could that woman read! She could read several books in a week. I can not remember exactly how many but I did not she her with the same book to often. It got to the point where she would mark the book on a certain page number with a pencil to try and cut down on the number of repeats. I think between both of my grandparents they read the entire mystery section (though there is a good chance they read more then that)
    I was 9 when I read Clash of the Titans. I know not really appropriate book for a 9 year old but I could not put it down. I remember my mom asking if I was ok since she hadn’t heard me moving around in a long while.
    This summer the reading plans involve read Harry Potter to my 7 year old son. We are still on the 1st one.

  95. 1. Our library had a school bus that would pick you up (on an established route), take you to the library and take you back about an hour or so later.
    2. The Little House books will stay in my heart forever.
    3. sigh. I don’t read enough, but I’m facinated by a new one called “the night of the gun”. A memoir of drug addiction.
    Thanks, Kay!

  96. I vaguely remember a bookmobile coming to our neighborhood a few times but I think the sellection was pretty disappointing to me after being in the vastness of the library. Also, I was scared that it wouldn’t come back and I would be fined for not returning a book on time.
    My favorite chapter book growing up was, “Are You There God? It’s me Margret.” I think I read that book at least once a year for a few years.
    This summer I want to read Friday Night Knitting Club, but I haven’t started it yet.

  97. Sorry, but I don’t have any bookmobile memories…we had a pretty nice town library. BUT, I was very bad a returning library books on time, so I’ll share my deepest, darkest, secret…shh!
    I used to take the books out without actually checking them out (no electronic surveillance back then) and then return them…I swear I always returned them, REALLY!!! I PROMISE!
    Dear Lord, don’t let me get arrested!
    Anyway, one of my favorite childhood book series, is the Melendy Quartet. And unlike many of my other favorites, my 2 sons have also enjoyed them – I had the greatest time reading the whole series aloud to them last year, when they were 6 & 10.
    Many books on the to read list: basically anything in the sci fiction section of the library that I haven’t already read!
    Mum’s the word! ;-)

  98. We went to the actual library as kids. I was a huge reader. I remember reading Nancy Drew, there was always another book to track down (is #35 in?). I kept reading and reading…always waiting for a little more spice with Ned…I guess I have always been trouble:)
    I finally started reading To Kill a Mockingbird, what was I waiting for??? Anyway, I will definately finish that this summer.

  99. Ah, big sigh. I can only remember the bookmobile coming into my life once when I was a kindergartner at First Baptist Church in Danville, IL. (Oh, so many moons ago). I never had seen anything so wonderful as a bus full of books that came right to the front of the school. I only went to school there that one year (half days, the other half spent at Mrs. Brown’s house where I was one of several baby-sat children.) And I only remember that one time with the bookmobile. We moved to the country and then my mother would take us on Saturdays, once a month, to the library in town where I’d check out dozens of books at a time.
    My favorite book from my childhood I found, actually, as a eighteen year old camp counselor in Arizona. Deep under one of the cabins were boxes and boxes of books (treasure!) where I found a dusty text called “Five Little Peppers and How They Grew” by Margaret Sidney (1881). A charming, charming tale of a large poor family raised by their widowed mom contrasted poignantly with my experience as the fifth of six raised by my divorced mother. I was hooked and have ever after looked for the Pepper books in used bookstores the world over. Now as a Catholic sister I rarely purchase the ones I find (which rarely happens, after all), but it’s the romance of the search that beckons me to those shelves.
    I hope, now, to find my copy of that first book and re-read it this summer. Thank you for the trip down to the basement of my memories and the trunk that holds that book.

  100. I don’t have a Bookmobile memory, since we lived in town, but I do have a summer reading contest memory.
    I was 8 or 9 years old and the Summer Reading Olympics were starting at the local public library. I was DETERMINED that I was going to “win” a gold medal by reading forty-eleven books before the deadline. (This was not a problem, since I loved (and still love) to read.)
    I read and read, and read some more and carefully wrote down each book and author on the sheet that the librarian kept. I felt very important when she finally remembered my name and pulled my log sheet out without me having to say anything.
    At the end of the summer, my arch-nemesis, Christine, and I tied for the number of books read. We both got gold medals and our photo in the local paper, pretending to compare reading lists. In reality, I imagine both of us were wishing the other would drop dead.
    Favorite childhood book(s) would have to be the Little House on the Prairie series by Laura Ingalls Wilder. Another all-time favorite was (is) The Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett.
    I intend to wade through at least a few of the advance copies of books that are starting to pile up beside the bed. Next up is Stealing Athena.

  101. 1) Sadly, we had no bookmobile when I was growing up, but my mom did take me to the library a lot, and I continued by taking my (10 year younger) sister every Wednesday in the summers when she was in elementary school. She sites those trips as one of her favorite childhood memories, and will randomly say, remember when we used to go to the library every week?
    2) Favorite chapter book growing up – Adopted Jane. I cant even find a copy of it now. AND all of the Laura Ingalls Wilder books, but particularly Farmer Boy.
    3) I am in the middle of reading Loving Frank – fictionalized story of FLW and his mistress. Good book.

  102. I did ride my bike to the library every day in the summer; we had no book mobile. One summer, I checked out Scarlet Hill several times. It was about a family with horses. I had a pixie as well, which kind of fluttered in the wind as I rode through the streets of Ferguson. This summer I want to finish A Brief History of Time. I have to read some passages twice, but I do understand the jokes.

  103. 1. No bookmobile, but bi-weekly library trips through grade school. We also had an awesome school librarian (my best friend’s mother) who let me return my books and get new ones after school. We were only supposed to do that during our bi-weekly classroom library time.
    2. My favorite chapter books… hmmm… I remember being enamored of biographies for several years, but I don’t think that counts as chapter books. While everyone else was reading Nancy Drew, I was reading The Bobbsey Twins! :)
    3. Debbie Macomber, A Good Yarn; and then Back on Blossom Street.

  104. I also lived too far out in the country for the bookmobile, but I have a story about my favorite girlhood book. “Christy” by Catherine Marshall. I loved that book then and I still do, but we with children all know how hard it is to get them to even try something we did as kids, let alone actually enjoy it!! When my daughter Mary was about 12 I tried to convince her to read “Christy”. She wasn’t interested…no how no way. I tried the only resource left to me and resorted to bribery. It took 4 books of her choosing PLUS ice cream to get her to agree to read it, AFTER she read her choice 4 books. I was SO pleased when she was hooked after the first couple of chapters. She still has her copy of the book!! I’ll never forget her closing the book at bedtime one night and giving out this big old sigh…”Oh!! I hope Christy marries the doctor!!” HA! Gotcha kid!

  105. No bookmobile but lots of memories of the library and searching for new treasures there.
    One of my fav books as a child – Dr Doolittle and the Secret Lake. I’m planning to read “Beatrix Potter – a life in nature” this summer.

  106. I also lived too far out in the country for the bookmobile, but I have a story about my favorite girlhood book. “Christy” by Catherine Marshall. I loved that book then and I still do, but we with children all know how hard it is to get them to even try something we did as kids, let alone actually enjoy it!! When my daughter Mary was about 12 I tried to convince her to read “Christy”. She wasn’t interested…no how no way. I tried the only resource left to me and resorted to bribery. It took 4 books of her choosing PLUS ice cream to get her to agree to read it, AFTER she read her choice 4 books. I was SO pleased when she was hooked after the first couple of chapters. She still has her copy of the book!! I’ll never forget her closing the book at bedtime one night and giving out this big old sigh…”Oh!! I hope Christy marries the doctor!!” HA! Gotcha kid!

  107. 1. Saw but never got the opportunity to use a bookmobile myself, but my Grandmother, living in a retirement building in the early 70s, did. I used to marvel at her weekly stack of books–it had to be two feet high, and I wondered just how many books that bookmobile had.
    2. Mrs. Mike …a story of a woman who married and moved to a remote Canadian wilderness: as I recall it, standouts include indians, disease, fire, death, and adventure. It made me feel exhilarated, sad, stronger, and hopeful to learn that it was possible to prevail against terrible odds.
    3. Ethan Frome …love them classics.

  108. I don’t have bookmobile memories, becuase I grew up in Philadelphia and had a number of library branches to choose from. I do have fond memories of the library though, especially after I had discovered Madeline L’Engle. I especially liked the Ring of Endless Light, about the girl who got to swim with the dolphins.
    I plan to read Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver.

  109. I spent most of my childhood in Tornillo, Texas, a town without a stoplight or a gas station, where my graduating class of 25 was considered large. For many years the school library (K-12) was presided over by a large Yugoslavian woman who had practically no budget, didn’t order in new books, and had such a censorous mind that she spent many afternoons ripping pictures of native women out of National Geographic. The county bookmobile was a bright spot in several of my high school summers, when I would ride my 3-speed bike a mile to the school parking lot in 100 degree (plus) heat. It was at the book mobile where I could read something other than 20-year old teen romances, including my own introduction to Judith Krantz. I loved Madeleine L’Engle’s “Wrinkle in Time,” which I read over and over.

  110. We didn’t have a bookmobile when I was growing up in Connecticut in the early 70s. But our public library had a summer reading program every summer – I was excited to finish 10 books asap, my sisters were required to participate!
    My daughter’s reading Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farms this summer in the Seattle public library’s reading program. She’s working on her 2nd set of 10 books.
    I’m planning to finish Michael Pollan’s In Defense of Food and then Must Love Dogs for book club.
    Great topic, by the way.

  111. We didn’t have a bookmobile, but I made extensive use of my elementary school library all year long. I remember informing the librarian that I intended to read every book in the library, and made a good start at the beginning section with the biographies of famous men and women (gender segregated on the shelf, of course, and color-coded).
    And that little early indicator of personality reminds me of another. My favorite book of my 4th grade year was The Phantom Tollbooth. When I was limited from taking home books from our small classroom library, I sat down with TPT and began to make my own copy, in longhand, on composition paper! My teacher had pity on me and let me borrow the book.
    Next month, I plan to read Tender at the Bone by Ruth Reichl.

  112. 1) I have some great bookmobile memories, but they’re secondhand, from my mother the librarian, who worked in a bookmobile back in the 50s. Possibly my favorite is the one where a patron asked her if she had “room for one more.” Well, the bookmobile was crowded, but she looked around and said “Sure, come on in!” But actually the patron was looking for a book by that name. OK, I guess you had to be there. The other one she tells is when the driver stepped on the gas and she went flying, out the door and into the street. Of course, that one is only funny because she wasn’t injured! Your pix are great, I have a lovely one of the same vintage of my mother on the bookmobile. I’m a librarian too but sadly I don’t get to ride on any bookmobiles.
    2) I was so proud when I began reading books with chapters and my earliest chapter book memory is of Ramona the Pest.
    3) I plan to finish Anna Karenina by the end of the summer. Maybe that’s cheating, I only have 50 pages left.

  113. Kay, we didn’t have the Bookmobile, but a few years ago I wrote a post on my blog about memories of my childhood library (and included information about my favorite books!). Here is the link to that post: http://abookaweek.blogspot.com/2006/06/what-should-library-look-like.html
    (I hope that works.) I too wore seersucker short sets, a pixie haircut, and rode my banana seat stringray. Were we separated at birth? (No, but I bet we were both born in the late 1950’s.)

  114. 1. My first job out of college in 1974 was as a Bookmobile librarian in rural Green Bay, WI. The kids and the whole thing was just plain awesome. The driver was an ex-Teamster who drove a Coca Cola truck in Watts during the riots and some of the patrons rode their horses to the Bookmobile stop. An awesome job; I loved it.
    2. My favorite chapter book, from age 8 when Mom read me a chapter a night, was The Secret Garden.
    3. I’m reading Labyrinth by Kate Mosse.

  115. I’m afraid my bookmobile memories are few, ancient, and too vague to articulate. In the formative reading habit years (2nd through 4th grades in my case), I lived where proximity and population obviated any book mobile, but we developed good book buying habits at least. Do you remember ordering paperbacks at school (it must have been through Scholastic?), filling out the order form on paper indistinguishable from newsprint, and turning them in with small bills and change (seems like you could buy a half dozen books for about $1.25)? After forever, the books arrived and were passed out in class. During this period I bought what became my favorite: The Funny Guy by Grace Allen Hogarth—a classic misfit little girl story with the memorable bit about eating a caterpillar wrapped in a sorrel leaf.
    This summer’s reading for me is Rebecca West’s brilliant and beautiful Black Lamb & Grey Falcon. Who would have thought that 1150 pages written in 1939 about the former Yugoslavian states would still fascinate and enlighten? Just when Iraq and Afghanistan had pushed the Balkans to the back of your mind, they pick up Bad Rad and everything old is new again.

  116. 1. Our town in North Dakota was too small for a bookmobile, but the Adams County Library was just 5 blocks away. I would ride my pink Schwin with dark pink bandana print banana seat there several times a week during the summer and participate in the summer reading program.
    2. All the Little House books. I was also a huge fan of biographies–still am.
    3. I want to reread Georgiana Duchess of Devonshire by Amanda Foresman, as I understand there’s a film in production.

  117. 1.We didn’t have a Bookmobile but I visited the library A LOT!
    2.I bought a Nancy Drew mystery at a church bazaar for 10 cents and became hooked on mysteries. After that I graduated to Erle Stanley Gardner Perry Mason mysteries.
    3. Plan to catch up on the Harry Potter series. For some reason I got stuck on #5.

  118. I didn’t have a book mobile, but I do remember the summer reading programs and I read all the Nancy Drew, Hardy Boys and Nurse Cherry books in 1 summer!
    My favorite book was my Grimm’s brothers fairy tales. In their version, the little mermaid (my fav) doesn’t get kissed and turns into the foam of the sea…..their fairy tales were always much more tragic.
    I am re-reading Stephen Kings Dark Tower series of books this summer.

  119. WOW—what a great post! I too had a cool blue Schwinn bike. It was the best.That feeling of freedom and riding to wherever you wanted to explore. The seeksucker sets with appliqued fruit-check. I even had red patent leather clogs with white patent leather fringe. Can’t you picture it? No bookmobile since we were living overseas most of my childhood, but many Saturdays spent in the American Club in Hong Kong checking out 10 books at a time(they wouldn’t let me take more, drat it) and returning them the next week.Read EVERY Nancy Drew. One of my favorite books from childhood-The Phantom Tollbooth. A book I want to read before summer is over: Mayflower. Can’t wait to see your new book!

  120. Oddly enough I don’t remember the public library of my childhood (I am under the impression the bizarre puppet show memories are really library memories, but truly, bizarre and puppet shows are not what libraries should be remembered for!!) A lot of my childhood memories are fuzzy, I just don’t have the vivid recollection that comes so easy to so many…… My library memories stem from the school library. The school library of my memory was a magical place full of everything you could ever want, old dark-wood shelving, with details carved in, large wood tables with chairs, the kind your legs swing from, little moving step-stools so you could reach higher than intended, and books everywhere, especially up high. I often wonder if I made it all up or if it was real, I could have made it up as that would have been what I so desperately wanted at the time, no matter, the happy of the memory was undoubtedly as real as it can be. The best thing was the librarian, who was ALWAYS surprised because I checked out books that only “older” kids were to be reading. I think now that she must have acted shocked, just to keep me doing it.
    My favorite books were any by George MacDonald. The most memorable being “The Princess and The Goblin” and “At the Back of the North Wind” They stand the test of time as every time I revisit them I find them as delightful as before.
    I went to my hold list at the library to see what I have on it, and “The Tenth Gift: a novel” by Jane Johnson is perhaps the one I most hope to get soon.

  121. I’m afraid I am too young for the Bookmobile (I think the equivalent was Scholastic book fairs) but I surely do have some favorite books! By the time I was three or four I’d memorized the entirety of the Little House books. My favorite now is The Long Winter but then I think it was By the Banks of Plum Creek. Is it cheating if I say I am going to reread those immediately? Fine, I am also going to read I Wanna Be Your Joey Ramone by Stephanie Kuehnert.

  122. We didn’t have a bookmobile – we had plenty of local public libraries in the county where I grew up in the Richmond, VA area.
    2. Wrinkle in Time To this day Madeline L’Engle is one of my favorite authors.
    3.On the Run by Iris Johansen. We started listening to it in the car on the way to and from the beach, but didn’t have quite enough time to finish it. So now I’m reading it.

  123. 1. A Bookmobile memory if you have one.
    We didn’t have a bookmobile but we had a similar program. It was a book order program. We would get a little pamphlet to take home to our parents and from that we could order books. My Mom always let me order a few books. Every time. Looking back, I don’t know how she did it because she was a single Mom with limited income (she wrapped presents in a department store) but books were never considered a luxury and I always LOVED that day I’d come in from recess and my new books would be waiting for me on my desk. Heaven! I still get a little thrill just thinking about it. It is the Amazon book at your front door times ten!
    Also, reading was so encouraged in my house, it was the only thing that could literally get us out of household chores. “Laurie, will you empty the dishwasher?” “I’m reading Mom.” “Oh, OK then.” You gotta love it!
    2. The title of a favorite chapter book from your childhood or your child’s childhood.
    I passionately loved (and read over and over) the All Things Bright and Beautiful series. Over and over until the books fell apart. I was probably 10 years old. When I read it as an adult I understood so much more but I got enough out of the books that I laughed and cried and adored those books! Many many lovely afternoons on a farm in Yorkshire.
    3. The title of a book you plan to read before the end of the summer of 2008.
    I’ve recently rediscovered my library and have been having a blast checking out books and reading them. It expands my reading horizon so much because I’m not committing to buying them before I try them. Currently I’m on a little bit of an Elizabeth Gaskell binge so I’m reading Cranford. I’d like to read her other ones this summer too. Mary Barton, North and South, Lois the Witch, and Ruth.
    I’ll have to share a story along this nostalgic book theme. Recently, a story I read as a kid has been running and running through my head. I could remember the main plot but not the book title and I was really wanting to read the story again. I was pretty young when I read this. I decided I really had to find out the book’s title and see if I could find it again. I was pointed in the direction of two wonderful resources, forums.abebooks.com/abesleuthcom and http://www.whatsthatbook.com/
    Thanks to them, within 24 hours I found out the book was called “A Room for Cathy” and I had a second-hand copy winging it’s way to me. When I opened that book and saw that it was exactly like my copy I had as a kid (same illustrations and cover!), it was such a wonderful way to revisit a little part of my youth. So familiar!

  124. My Sting Ray was sparkly gold and had tassles! I grew up in a small town on Long Island with a library right across the street from the elementary school and I was their best customer. I always completed the summer reading program first and they stopped giving stickers out after 20 books. I’ve had stacks of books by my bed for over 40 years thanks to libraries! I love the idea of a Bookmobile – all of those books coming right to you!
    My early childhood was filled with the Little House books and Anne of Green Gables, but then I fell in love with John Steinbeck’s books, I would say Cannery Row was my favorite.
    This summer I’m reading The Fortune Cookie Chronicles, about the history of Chinese food in America. Fascinating!

  125. Sadly I don’t have a bookmobile story but I lived by the library so I would ride my bike (also blue and banana seated, but sadly, no sparkles) to the library and get as many books as I could carry.
    I am going to give you a series because Nancy Drew was my all time favorite and I read all the books that I could get a hold of. I loved them all.
    The one book that I really want to read this summer (and have started just may take all summer for me to read heh) is The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls. It has been really good I just don’t have a lot of reading time.

  126. I lived only two blocks from the public library which was housed on the lower floor of the public school so I have no bookmobile memories. I do remember summer Read-Away-Vacation book clubs where a tiny paper book was pasted opposite your name on a big poster for every book you read. My “go outside and play” memories involve ousting me from the big blue chair with the cut velvet upholstery in the living room. I loved to read and still do. I don’t remember the title of the book but I loved it and checked it out of the library as often as they’d let me. It was about a little girl who wanted a pair of shiny red shoes with a strap (like Mary Janes) and was told she couldn’t have them but by the end of the book, she was given the shoes. I have no idea of a special title that I’m going to read this summer. I check out 15 books at a time from the library and devour them. This week it’s a group of Patricia Wentworth mysteries.

  127. I grew up loving books! Unfortunately, even going to the library was a rare thing for me, with two working parents and living in a suburb with no library in walking or biking distance. I heard rumors of a bookmobile, but I have never seen one in person. I did, however, belong to many, many book clubs and had a nice sized library at home!
    By far, my favorite chapter books from childhood were the Little House books – with Little House In The Big Woods being my personal favorite. I also loved all of the Uncle Wiggly stories.
    As for what I plan to read this summer, I don’t currently have anything in mind, but I think I may want to read Lord Of The Rings very soon.

  128. 1. I spent my junior high years in New Jersey and there I encountered a bookmobile for the first and only time. I remember trying to pretty much read my way through that whole van. I learned origami and heiroglyphics from books I checked out then.
    2. I have so many childhood favorites but the top of the list is Black Beauty. I just can’t pick a favorite chapter though.
    3. Bonk by Mary Roach

  129. No bookmobile in our town because we had a good library. When we went to Hawaii the summer I turned 7 I remember getting local library cards and reading the series about the All of a Kind Family in the banyan trees at the park. I absolutely loved those books.
    My favorite book was probably Anne of Green Gables. This summer I want to read Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! Voices from a Medieval Village. I always try to read the new Newbery Medal winner in the summer.

  130. You got me with the Steel Magnolias reference! (I played Shelby in our community theatre production last year… “Pink is my signature color!”) Unfortunately, I don’t have a book mobile memory, but I remember DYING to have something so fantastic as a bookmobile come to our tiny Kansas town. Sadly, I was stuck with the little local library and our “summer reading program.” We got a bookmark (with a real yarn tassle!) when we finished filling out our list. My favorite chapter book was absolutely and positively “Black Beauty,” and before the end of the summer, I’ll have re-re-re-read Amy Tan’s “One Hundred Secret Senses.”

  131. 1. There weren’t any bookmobiles where I grew up, but we did have a great library.
    2. I absolutely loved Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House on the Prairie series. I distinctly remember that I was up to the third book (Farmer Boy) when my first grade class did the annual spring field trip to the library, because when I chose it as my book to check out that day, I got into an argument with the librarian over whether a child of my age would be capable of reading it. (I won.)
    3. I have John Varley’s Demon/Wizard/Titan (possibly not in that order) series sitting on my shelf just waiting for me to get over my university-summer-term induced brain fry.

  132. I did not go the bookmobile. I went to the little library in my neighborhood. My favorite librarian’s name was Charlotte. She taught me the difference between authour and arthur. My favorite book she told me to read was Palmer Patch. It was about a skunk who talked. I also loved Harriet the Spy and of course Nancy Drew.
    This summmer was the 50th birthday party for my little library. They had scrap books from yester year and my brother, sisters and I were in it from the 25th anniversary…Talk about feeling old!!
    A book I hope to read this summer is Metzger’s Dog – I just can’t seem to find it anywhere. A book I would recommend is Engulfed in Flames by David Sedaris. It is Laugh OUT LOUD funny!!
    Oh- by the way – I had a blue sting ray bike too!! (With a basket and a bell!!!!)

  133. I did not go the bookmobile. I went to the little library in my neighborhood. My favorite librarian’s name was Charlotte. She taught me the difference between authour and arthur. My favorite book she told me to read was Palmer Patch. It was about a skunk who talked. I also loved Harriet the Spy and of course Nancy Drew.
    This summmer was the 50th birthday party for my little library. They had scrap books from yester year and my brother, sisters and I were in it from the 25th anniversary…Talk about feeling old!!
    A book I hope to read this summer is Metzger’s Dog – I just can’t seem to find it anywhere. A book I would recommend is Engulfed in Flames by David Sedaris. It is Laugh OUT LOUD funny!!
    Oh- by the way – I had a blue sting ray bike too!! (With a basket and a bell!!!!)

  134. 1. I was young enough not to be allowed to walk to the bookmobile by myself, so I had to tag along with my older cousin and her friends, and they were into horses, slam books, and the Beatles. I was the kind of kid who would read while walking to the bookmobile and back.
    2. “Honestly, Katie John”
    3. The library has “The Mercedes Coffin” by Faye Kellerman on order, and I am on the waiting list.

  135. 1. I was young enough not to be allowed to walk to the bookmobile by myself, so I had to tag along with my older cousin and her friends, and they were into horses, slam books, and the Beatles. I was the kind of kid who would read while walking to the bookmobile and back.
    2. “Honestly, Katie John”
    3. The library has “The Mercedes Coffin” by Faye Kellerman on order, and I am on the waiting list.

  136. My happiest memories are riding my Schwinn Breeze to the Webster Library! My only bookmobile memory is from last week when I saw Joan Cusack play the mobile librarian who can’t drive in “Kit Kittredge”. I would like to urge readers looking for something new that is old to try “Baby Island” by Carol Ryrie Brink in 1937 – it’s Robinson Crusoe with girls and babies by the “Caddie Woodlawn” author. This summer I am dedicating myself to books about ice cream and novels by Georgette Heyer – this is going to make me a plump and giggly woman.

  137. Chapter Book: Cam Jansen
    Book to read this summer: Sense and Sensibility
    I grew up a little too late for a Bookmobile, but us kids and mom had entire summer days that consisted of the main branch of the Anaheim Public Library, the public swimming pool, and lunch at Carl’s Jr. We’d check out a stack of 10-15 books every two weeks or so, mostly picture books for my little sister, but at least one fat mystery novel for my mom. I remember moving awkwardly from young adult fiction to Stephen King novels somewhere along the way and soon I was down to one or two books per library visit instead of five or six. But I loved all those Cam Jansen books, and I remember being pretty disappointed that I didn’t (and still don’t) have a photographic memory.
    Happy Blogiversary!

  138. Oh, the bookmobile memories! I lived in Royal Oak, Michigan as a young girl. The bookmobile probably accounts for the fact that I made it to adulthood, because books were as necessary to me as breathing, and in the summer the school library was closed.
    The bookmobile would cruise through our neighborhood like the ice cream truck, playing music to get our attention. I would grab my books and more or less stampede over to my elementary school (Starr Elementary) where the bookmobile would park under a tree.
    We were limited to three books at a time (a severe book diet for me, though I realized that if everyone took as many books as I wanted to the bookmobile would soon be empty!). I would browse through the dusty stacks, always hoping to get the best books before someone else found them. I soon figured out that asking the librarian was a good way to be introduced to great new books.
    One of my very favorite bookmobile books was Enourmous Egg by Oliver Butterworth. I spent years after that actively searching for my very own triceratops egg.
    And one of the books I intend to read by the end of this summer is Friends, Lovers, Chocolate by Alexander McCall Smith.
    Thank you so much for sparking the bookmobile memories. Now I get to bore my kids with them. And I can’t wait for your new book. I made a fabulous log cabin afghan from you last book, but that was nothing. Now I’m making a ballband afghan.

  139. Ahh yes, summer reading on the bed in the boathouse at my uncle’s cottage… it would have been anything Nancy Drew for me, but the Ghost of Blackwood Hall is likely my fave. And while I would like to tell you I was reading something profound, something smart, something you “should” read this summer, really I am just waiting for the 178 people in line ahead of me at the library to finish Stephenie Meyer’s ‘The Host’.

  140. I love the photos in this post and I now have a need to read “Thinking About Memoir”. But anyway,
    1. No bookmobile for me, but I do remember when our primary school class used to walk to the local library in a long single file snake with a teacher at the front and another at the back. And even then, just like now, I took out more books than I could finish in the time until I went back.
    2. My favourite book was “The B.F.G.” by Roald Dahl (although the granny with the mouth screwed up like a cat’s bum in “George’s Marvellous Medicine” gave it a run for it’s money!).
    3. Before the end of Summer 2008 I want to read “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee, because for some reason I missed it at school (and since then) and my friend Dermot is threatening to disown me if I don’t find a copy and devour it soon!

  141. No childhood bookmobile memories, but I work at a public library now and we just gave our old bookmobile to a parish in New Orleans (where it doesn’t matter that it doesn’t drive well in the snow and on hills).
    I practically lived in the library when I was a kid, and I remember walking home with HUGE stacks of books (probably something to do with why I became a librarian). Some of my favorites were Summer of my German Soldier, Nancy Drew, and in my early years, Frog and Toad.
    This summer I’m planning to read Geraldine Brooks’ People of the Book and The Tenth Gift by Jane Johnson. I just finished Laurie R. King’s The Bee Keeper’s Apprentice, which was fabulous.
    Congrats on 5 years of blogging!

  142. There was an ancient bookmobile that looked like a gigantic green enamel toaster in our community for a while, but it was retired before I got my first library card. Summer vacations, my brothers and I bicycled three hot sweaty midwestern humid miles to the library, usually with a younger sibling balanced on the fender or the handlebars. (Keep your feet UP! Quit wiggling!) We were allowed to take out as many books as we were years old, up to twelve — my mom’s edict, or the house would have collapsed under the weight of library books.
    We’d stop at the Conoco station/bait shop half way home for a much needed ice-cold Orange Crush, and read on the creosoty bench in front of the bait shop while we finished our soda pop.
    Favorite childhood book? Half Magic, by Edward Eager. It’s still great. Rufus M. by Eleanor Estes is a close runner-up, though. Heck, my child is named Rufus partly because of Rufus M. (who knits a warshcloth in the book, by the way)
    Book(s) I’m planning to read this summer:
    Journals of Lewis and Clark. Those guys could not spell their way out of a wet paper bag, but their adventures are riveting.
    To Say Nothing of the Dog by Connie Willis. Actually I’m re-reading this. It’s the perfect summer book.

  143. I grew up in a really small town in the 1950’s – so no bookmobile – but I would ride my bike to the library every Saturday to get my maximum 3-books-at-a-time allotment. I can still visualize the exact spot in that library where my favorite books were (Little House In the Big Woods, et al). But I also dearly loved Cherry Ames, Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew – it would be tough to pick a favorite. I plan to read Snow Flower and the Secret Fan by Lisa See before the summer’s over.

  144. Books and yarn! What is a knitting librarian supposed to do….?
    1. I have no bookmobile memory. I think I have been on a bookmobile but I may be confusing it with the GIVE BLOOD truck and a dream I had. So I am skipping this part.
    2. The Secret Garden was mine from childhood. But I am reading to BoyWonder (age 8) and to myself the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series. Its like crack! Fun and hilarious and fast.
    3. Um….to finish all of the Percy Jackson series (I am on book 4, Battle of the Labyrinth.) For myself I want to force myself to finish Animal Vegetable Miracle (its ok, its just….you know. Not Percy Jackson.)
    Is it wrong to STILL like kid lit so much?

  145. The Bookmobile stopped at our corner, Danbury and Golden, in Clinton Twp., Mich. The Bookmobile Lady was a sweet “older” lady who used to do a story hour in our garage after everyone had picked their books. We all sat on the cool cement to listen to her stories. My favorite book during childhood was Cherry Ames, Student Nurse, but I read all the Nancy Drew books too. This summer, I’m currently reading Ann Patchett’s Patron Saint of Liars. Thanks for the memories Kay!

  146. 1)No Bookmobile in my childhood town of Wakefield, Massachusetts, but a grandly appointed children’s room at the public library – huge, dark, smelling wonderfully of books. Here in Rockport, there is a Bookmobile that takes books and tapes around to the home-bound elderly. A side story – several years back, when Rockport outgrew its picturesque Carnegie Library, townspeople of all ages formed a snake and passed the books hand-to-hand from the old building to the new.
    2) I have a fond memory of my mother reading me a chapter book called “B is for Betsy” when I was just too young to read by myself. I was delighted to find that old title, in fact a whole series about Betsy, in the children’s room in Rockport. My daughters loved Betsy, too, with her amusing little escapades, and now we own the entire series. My favorite as an independent reader, though, was “Heidi” – I just wore that book out. My friend, also a Mary, was a bookish child, too, and when our parents forced us to “Go out and get some fresh air and exercise,” we’d go hide under a tree and read all day together.
    3) I have just jumped into “Moscow Rules,” the eighth in a series by Daniel Silva about Gabriel Allon, an Israeli Mossad agent. No new Harry Potter this summer, sob! And I have pledged to finish both Barack Obama books, as well as about umpteen UFOs.

  147. 1. My only memory of the bookmobile was seeing it promoted on Saturday morning TV and Sesame Street and then wishing one would drive by my house so that I could partake of the bookmobile experience. While driving somewhere with my mother, I finally saw one and wanted to stop to check out a book. My mother told me to stop being ridiculous because there was a library closer to our house than the bookmobile. Of course, we didn’t stop for a book, but I’ve yet to stop being ridiculous.
    2. “Strawberry Girl” by Lois Lenski. “Shoo Fly Girl” was another favorite. Hmm, haven’t thought about those books for years and years, but now I really want to read them again.
    3. “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time” by Mark Haddon. I really will read it before summer’s end. Really, I will.

  148. Alas, alas, there was no bookmobile in my neighborhood like you see in these charming pictures, although one occasionally visited the school. For a child who adored to read, this was a serious oversight on SOMEONE’s part, I’m not sure whose. As I recall, the teachers were on a strict schedule and hustled us in and out of the bookmobile faster than… well, faster than I wanted to leave. In summertime there was an even greater dearth of reading material. My parents placed no premium upon purchasing books, intent as they were on feeding and clothing us. (Amazing, that.) But right next door to my great grandparents, who lived only a few blocks away, was the Lady Who Also Loved Books. Don’t ask me her name; I have no idea. What she did have was a whole bookshelf, about 6′ wide and maybe 5′ tall which contained Books. She actually allowed one to check out books from her personal library, to be returned in two weeks, of course.
    My father’s aunt, Aunt Flossie, had some real books at her house, and more than once when it came time to leave after a visit I was found curled up in the floor behind a chair, reading as fast as I could. She gave me a lovely, unabridged copy of “Little Women” — I still have it although I read the cover off — and it remains one of my favorite books to this day. She also gave me “Jane Eyre” a few years later. Both of these I treasure as an introduction to the classics, of which I am still extremely fond.
    My summer reading this year promises to be of a different variety: “Couture: The Fine Art of Sewing” by Roberta Carr is on my list.

  149. 1. We didn’t have a bookmobile, but do have a small public library where we always had a children’s story hour. I remember very vaguely going to that story hour as a child. One year when I was quite small (3 or 4, I believe) we made Christmas ornaments from canning jar lids, wrapping paper, rick rack, and a picture of each of us. I don’t know for sure if my parents still have the ornament (actually, I just checked up in their attic in the Christmas ornaments box–not there–they have probably thrown out my precious childhood memory just because it was falling totally apart. Well, that’s the way it goes, but I did find a bunch of pictures of the grandchildren in that box. I guess their youngest child no longer holds importance in their life ;o)), but I recall hanging it on the tree most years of my life. I wore a yellow and red all over patterned jumper that my mom had made with a big E on the front.
    2. My favorite book series when I was young were the Laura Ingalls Wilder books. Around elementary school time my favorite in the series was The Long Winter.
    3. Lilla’s Feast.

  150. Bookmobile Memory: I remember the anticipation of something new to read as my 3rd grade class stood waiting for our turn in the bookmobile. I remember how stuffy it would become as as my entire class scrambled into it at the same time. I remember the musty smell of all those books crammed into the shelves, running my finger over the spines of the books while I read title, author and numbers of the Dewey Decimal System and making sure everything was in the correct order. I remember the thrill of finding just the right book and taking it up to the Librarian and waiting for her to date stamp a card and carefully insert it into the pocket glued onto the book before handing it to me. Mine for the Week! All Mine!
    Favorite book: Ishi, Last of His Tribe

  151. We didn’t have a Bookmobile since the library was in the center of town & was open on the same daily schedule as the stores and bank. How convenient!
    My favorite book was Rascal by Sterling North. How could an 8 yo who lived in the woods not love raccoons?
    This summer I will finish the Georgia Nicolson series by Louise Rennison. Granted, it’s a teen series about a 14 yo girl in UK, but I’ve never read a more hilarious book. It’s a gasp-for-breath, wet-yourself-while crying read. It’s just about the only thing my dtr & I read together.

  152. 1. We lived in Columbus, Ohio until I was five (and then out of the country for the next 5 years) so I only have one, very vague memory of the Book Mobile coming to park on the playground of the school behind our house where I attended kindergarten. I remember hugging the book I checked out to my chest and the feeling of awe to be able to get a book out of a “truck” (a bus, in reality) in the middle of summer just like the Sidewalk Sundaes and Orange Push-ups from the ice cream truck.
    2. Favorite Chapter Book as a Child: Cherry Ames, Student Nurse. (LOL, this is embarassing!) I was given that book when I was 8 while recovering from heart surgery and from that moment on I wanted to be a nurse. I read and re-read the book so many times I still have it memorized. I read all the books in the series (there are about 25 books!), and have passed the Cherry Ames “bug” on to my eldest daughter who loves them, too (and wants to be a nurse as well). My dad called the books “Betty Bedpan”.
    3. I’m reading the third book in the Twilight series along with my daughter who is now 15. It’s fun to read along with her, to fight over who gets the book, and have long, rambling discussions about the books. This is the part of motherhood you dream of, and makes up for a lot of eye rolling and teen bobble heads.

  153. Well, I wish I had a spectacular book mobile memory, but I only remember that the book mobile actually came to my school. I’m not sure exactly why, except that I went to a small private school in the south (the kind that were started because the government began integrating schools; yeah, I was kind of shocked the day I realized that too), and maybe they were afraid we didn’t have many books in our library, or maybe it was just so we’d get a different selection every once in a while.
    Favorite childhood chapter book… Anything Nancy Drew or Hardy Boys or Trixie Belden.
    And a book I plan to read before the end of this summer…American Gods by Neil Gaiman.

  154. I don’t ever remember a book mobile when I was growing up in the late 50’s and 60’s. I do remember trips to the library with stacks of books being brought home. I hated reading when I was a kid, but it was required “during the heat of the day”. Now, I have several books going at the same time – car books, work books, books beside the bed at night. I am an avid reader!

  155. 1) no ook mobile but lots of trips to library to earn my free ice cream cone for the summer reading program
    2) Charlie and the chocolate factory
    3) Shadows in the white city

  156. I wish I had a Bookmobile memory! I read about bookmobiles somewhere, when I was little and the idea fired my imagination. Like a magic carpet and a library rolled into one – I wanted to LIVE on a bookmobile. Lucky for me, our library was walking distance away & though I couldn’t live there I sure did spend plenty of my summer in those stacks.
    One of the childhood books I remember fondly was THE FIVE LITTLE PEPPERS AND HOW THEY GREW. There was a series, but I don’t recall any of the other titles.
    This summer I have loads of reading I want to do, THE SPARROW by Mary Doria Russell is on order & I’m waiting for it eagerly.
    Good luck with your new book – sure to be a hit after the last, right?

  157. 1. Sorry…no Bookmobile. =( The closest I got was the Scholastic book order forms…what joy!
    2. Chapter Book: Brighty of the Grand Canyon
    3. Before the end of summer: Dragon’s Wild

  158. 1. No bookmobile but I have distinct and clear memories of my second grade year, when our class libary day was Friday. I would check out a “new” (or should I say different — as I remember them they were always old, dog-eared, yellowed and had thick prehistoric duct tape holding the binding on) biography, take it home, pull it out after dinner on Friday, and stay up reading ALL NIGHT until the book was finished. By the end of second grade, that meant I got to sleep by 1:00 a.m. or so, but it was definitely the start of a 40+ year insomniac streak — since totally cured by the miracle of pointy sticks and string! Now all I have to do is put my project du jour, in its protective zip-lock, of course, on the bed and I’m out like a light!
    2. Favorite chapter books –for my kids, the Redwall series by Brian Jacques. The idea of all those rodents talking and ruling the world . . .
    3. Book I plan to read: The Knit Stitch by Sally Melville. FINALLY I understand the draw of the Einstein coat!
    Loved your first book, please pick me for the second!

  159. Boy, I wish I had a bookmobile growing up. Then I wouldn’t have been reduced to rereading my own books all summer long between our trips to the library (and sneaking into my sister’s room to read her books when she wasn’t home – we were very territorial back then).
    I had so many favorites growing up. I think the series I read the most was Little House on the Prairie books by Laura Ingalls Wilder. I reread those all the time. My other favorites were A Little Princess and The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett. As I got older I was crazy for Judy Blume (were’t we all) and the Anne of Green Gables series by L.M. Montgomery.
    The book I am reading right now is Six Wives: The Queens of Henry the 8th by David Starkey. I am usually a fiction reader, but this book is so well written and so captivating that I can’t help myself. It’s a good thing too, because it’s a brick.

  160. 1. I remember HEARING that there was such-a-thing as a bookmobile and thinking “you mean they bring the library to YOU?!” But I never saw one. I am not bummed that I don’t have a laugh-through-tears story!
    2. Any Oz book, my Dad had them all and we read them one-by-one together. How awesome is that?
    3. I am re-reading a lot of favorites right now, will probably get to “The Eight” next(again). Good stuff!

  161. No Bookmobiles in Southern Arizona in my childhood, but, oh my, air conditioned branch libraries! The freedom to browse shelves and shelves and shelves of books and ponder my choices.
    My favorite childhood book was the Boxcar Children series. The ingenuity of those kids in furnishing a boxcar and the absence of parental types enthralled me. It was as close as I could come to the hot days spent playing in desert and dry riverbeds, acting out all kinds of imaginary lives and plots. (There were pirates involved sometimes, which is conceptually complicated in a desert environment, but, an island is an island, even in a dry gulch.)
    For this summer, do I have to pick only one? I’ve finished The Sugar Queen, an Ariana Franklin, and Nevada Barr’s Winter Study, and have started Janet Evanovich’s Fearless Fourteen and Alexander McCall Smith’s The Miracle at Speedy Motors. I’m listening to Minette Walters’ Fox Evil (do books on CD count?), and am looking forward to Hallam’s War, Sun Going Down, White Rose Rebel, The Girl of His Dreams, O’Hara’s Choice and Why Mermaids Sing. More, lots more!

  162. 1 – You know how when you are little, your sister can be your best friend or your worst enemy, depending on the day? Bookmobile days were the one day when my little sister and I were always absolutely best friends. We went to the bookmobile together, picked books together, we read together, and we acted out books together. We still tell each other everything we read.
    2 – Anything Nancy Drew – I still can’t believe I didn’t grow up to be a detective and marry Ned.
    3 – Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman

  163. My mom took me to the library every couple of weeks in the summer. She and my father were avid golfers, which meant I spent every summer Sunday afternoon at the country club pool, where I felt (and looked) painfully shy, uncool and dorky. I would roll down all the windows and open the back hatch of the family station wagon, and hide in the “way back,” where I could lie down and read through my stack of library books in private. I loved anything by Edward Eager — Half Magic, The Knight’s Castle, The Time Garden — tongue in cheek stories of magical adventures that I read over and over. My children, like millions of others, adored Harry Potter, and we whiled away thousands of miles reading them aloud during car trips driven between New Jersey and Indiana over the years. Since I’m a third career (old) seminary student preparing to take my ordination exams at the end of the summer, I’m planning to finish re-reading Daniel Migliore’s book Faith Seeking Understanding, but that’s not beach reading by anyone’s standards…

  164. 1) I was lucky enough to live around the corner from the local branch library–I didn’t even have to cross a street to get there! So no bookmobile memories for me.
    A friend of mine spent a few summers creating bookmobile memories for kids in Vermont, though. Her husband built a fabulous gypsy wagon, which they pull behind a vintage panel truck. My friend filled it with kids books and would drive into a village center in their rural town each week for reading time. Kids would be lined up and waiting to sit in that magical vardo and read.
    2) I was also a reader who hated to go out and play. My mother would lock us out in all seasons and weather, so we’d get some fresh air. In winter I remember sitting in the garage, freezing, with a book. No wonder my feet and hands are always cold! Probably my favorite was The Secret Garden.
    3) I have such a queue of books to read! Next up is Three Cups of Tea by Greg Mortensen. And maybe I’ll have to reread The Secret Garden…
    Thanks so much for your blog–I always enjoy it.

  165. It’s a kick to read all the comments, but I need to get back to my reading, so I’ll just scroll down to the bottom here to tell you about my reads. (Always a sucker for a contest…)
    We had a bookmobile that came to my elementary school now and then, but that wasn’t the big deal. The Big Deal was being allowed to walk after school up to the branch library and check out as many books as I could carry home. I’m sure it was well over a mile home, and I carried books piled right up to my chin. I remember my dismay when I realized that I had read most of the books in the children’s section.
    When my daughters turned 6 I made a big deal about allowing them to get their own library cards, and we went to the library a lot. When she was in her early twenties my older daughter had her wallet stolen, and more than anything she grieved the loss of that original library card, which she was STILL using, with her name scrawled in six-year old handwriting.
    Favorite childhood chapter books — there were so many, but I think my specialty was every Oz book I could get my hands on. One Christmas my parents gave me a case of Oz books (probably at least a dozen) and I had read all of them by February. Because my kids weren’t interested in them, I regretfully sold them (for quite a bit of money, as many were first editions) to a book dealer when I was in my late 40’s.
    This summer. Well, I’m on vacation now in Maine, in a town that has the world’s best used book store. We fill up two grocery bags with books every summer on the first day we’re here. My taste this summer seems to be running toward novels involving sickness and accidents. Jodi Picoult’s “My Sister’s Keeper” is beside my bed right now, and others in the pile beside my chair are “When Madeline Was Young” by Jane Hamilton, “Never Let Me Go” by Kizuo Shiguro, and “Any Bitter Thing” by Monica Wood. That should keep me busy (as in, reading all day when I’m not trying to master Cat Bordhi’s new pathways for sock knitters) for three weeks.
    Happy blogiversary! I think of you both as my friends, and you make my day, day after day. thanks for being you!
    Judy

  166. No bookmobile for me, but I did love all things Ramona Quimby by Beverly Cleary. I particularly loved Ramona Quimby, Age 8.
    As for this summer, I’m planning on reading the Twilight series by Stephanie Meyer.
    Can’t wait for your book!!

  167. 2. The Chronicles of Narnia (pick one, I loved them all)
    3. The Confessor by Terry Goodkind

  168. 1. I don’t have a bookmobile memory, but can I share one told by our local bookmobile driver? When asked to justify the existence of the bookmobile, he would cite the case of the elderly patron who visited his bookmobile every week. She had to use the bookmobile because her daughter had taken away her car keys after she twice rear-ended other people while driving to the local library. He drove the bookmobile as an act of public safety.
    2. Heidi — it was the summer after second grade and I sat out a neighborhood badminton tourniment because I was READING!
    3. The Bartimaeus Trilogy – I’m half way through the second one and the third is already on reserve at the library. Yeah summer reading!!

  169. I missed the whole bookmobile thing, but I do read lots of books.
    (2) I really liked the “Lioness Rampant” books, starting with “Alanna: The First Adventure”.
    (3) I’m reading Carl Sagan’s “Cosmos” now. I’m busy, but I’d surprised not to be done by the end of the summer. :)

  170. i longed for a bookmobile because waiting for a ride to the town’s library – miles away – was not fun. plus, it looked great on TV! was it Andy Griffith? the Waltons? I don’t know. but, until i was a teenager i relied on my parents for a ride. once i was old enough, i rode there on my schwinn 10 speed.
    by that time i was way past chapter books. I remember a book I loved as a teen, “They’ll Never Make a Movie Starring Me,” by Alice Bach. Man I longed for boarding school.
    This summer I’m going to read Brideshead Revisited – I saw a movie has been made of it — featuring Emma Thompson – and I realized I’ve never read it.
    Onward and Upward. Congratulations — for both having a bookmobile and your two lovely book babies.
    Denise, Charlottesville, Virginia

  171. Ooh, this is fun!
    1. I don’t have a bookmobile memory, as my town didn’t have one! However, I DO have an “OLD library” story. My town has a library downtown built in the 30s, and a new one right by my house built in the 90s but I still prefer the downtown one to this day because I remember the feeling of walking into this huge building with the narrow halls and aisles, and that “library/church basement” smell that I still love. I love that smell, which is one of the weirder things about me.
    2. The Boxcar Children (the original one). I remember losing myself in that world, imagining things that seemed so strange. Footraces, milk that came in bottles, fresh brownbread from a breadshop, and drinking from tin cups.
    3. Before the end of summer 2008, I plan to read a book I ordered from Amazon awhile back but haven’t gotten around to yet, called “The Story of Forgetting”.

  172. Ahh, books finally get me to comment as well.
    1. I only have slight memory of ever getting on our bookmobile in Springfield but I remember finding the slanted shelves so odd and yet smart. I remember having getting my first library card, looking up books in the paper card catalog and taking home stacks of books a Carnegie library that seemed so big as a child. My library experience has become more electronic now with online catalogs and drive up window to pick up books, but the same love of literature is there.
    2. The Girl with the Silver Eyes, made me love science fiction as a kid, Dear Mr Henshaw helped me understand everyone struggled to fit into the world and books I read early on like The Whipping Boy just made me love a good story.
    3. I just finished Eat, Pray, Love and found it to be a great book. On the fiction front I hope to read the Ten-year Nap before the summer is over, that is if I don’t get distracted re-reading some childhood books I loved. Anne of Green Gables is calling my name.

  173. We didn’t have a bookmobile when I was little, but I loved the library. In fact, one of the old librarians is still there and she signed up my 8 month old for the summer reading program!! Anyway, I loved the Louisa May Alcott books growing up and read them all – over & over & over again. I plan on re-reading the Chronicles of Narnia this summer, which I own the entire collection.

  174. Oh, Kay. Summer Reading memories. I also was one of those kids who saw summer as an excuse to lie around and read all day–until my mom would force me to go play outside. Then, in some bizarre twist, she would have trouble getting me back in again before dark. Go figure.
    We only had a bookmobile visit our school once, but I remember that is where I found my first copy of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. I still love that whole series. The first time I read it, the allegory went right over my head. I just liked the story. My best summer book memories of childhood involve the secondhand bookstore a few towns over. Every couple of weeks, my mom would drive us there so we could trade in what we had read and get some new stuff. I went through every Nancy Drew that way, and pretty darn quick.
    As for a book I want to read before the end of the summer: I recently finished The Pillars of the Earth as an audiobook, and I just got the sequel, The World Without End, in hardback from the library. I found the audiobook of Pillars a little slow, so I wanted to read the sequel myself as a book, ya know? Anyway, I swear the thing weighs at least 10 pounds. I don’t think it will make good beach reading, but I am looking forward to reading it anyway!

  175. 1. No bookmobiles in rural Saskatchewan. We only went to the library in the winter. I spent my summers re-reading the books we owned and picking weeds and bugs in the huge potato patch.
    2. Favorite childhood book-The Girl of the Limberlost by Gene Stratton Porter.
    3. Reading now-Martin pippin in the Meadow, by Eleanor Farjeon. Children’s stories that are so perfectly written that I’m doling thme slowly.

  176. Let’s see…
    First chapter book ever… Sarah Crewe (The Little Princess) by Frances Hodgson Burnett
    A book I plan to read this summer… Ina May’s Guide to Childbirth, by Ina May Gaskin, in preparation for the birth of my third child.
    (Unfortunately, we did not have a bookmobile visiting my town in the late 70s and 80s, when I was a kid riding my bike around town. We did, however, have a lovely public library and I have lots of great memories having to do with that old brick building with lots of ivy climbing the exterior and a weeping willow in the yard, and, of course, the books found within.)

  177. We didn’t have a bookmobile because we had a great public library. I worked there for a few years in high school.
    My son has been reading and re-reading the Percy Jackson and the Olympians all summer. Chapter 2 of the first book is entitled “Kniting the Socks of Death.” How could you not love that?
    I will finish the Arsonist’s Guide to Writers’ Homes in New England this summer. Soon, I hope.

  178. 1. In Scotland, we called it a mobile library but it was the same thing, I guess. I lived in a village near Aberdeen for 5 years from the age of 5 and the mobile library was a huge part of my life. When I moved there, the teacher at school couldn’t keep me and my best friend in books, as we read so much, so fast. The library was such a lifeline but my main memory was a “coffee table” type book on Ballet. I wanted to be a ballerina in those days, and loved to drool over the pictures.
    2. What’s a chapter book? I loved Enid Blyton’s Magic Faraway Tree and Wishing Chair books. And the Chalet School series by Elinor M Brent-Dyer.
    3. Before my NZ winter or your northern hemisphere summer is out, I’ll have finished The Da Vinci Code. I’m about half way through and loving it, despite others thinking it’s not a good read. But I also want to get more of Philippa Gregory’s books having recently read The Other Boleyn Girl, which was excellent!
    Love
    Jill
    xx

  179. 1. Bookmobile: we actually had one in my neighborhood up until three years ago. It would come be parked 1/2 a block from my house every other Tuesday. As silly as this seems, it was still a thrill to step on that little stool to get in.
    2. Chapter Book: A Wrinkle in Time
    3. Summer Book: Palace Council

  180. We did not have a bookmobile in our town, which had a wonderful library. Now and then I would hear that there were bookmobiles in other towns and I would get very jealous.
    My fav was Charlotte’s Web.
    I would like to read Harry Potter numbers 6 and 7!

  181. 1. We didn’t have a bookmobile, but I swear that tomboyish girl with the striped shirt and pigtails looks like me circa late 60’s!
    2. The Crone’s Brew was my favorite book. I still have it, and have read it to my kidlets.
    3.I just finished reading Knitting America, and am looking for another good read. Any suggestons?

  182. Oh the bookmobile! I tried explaining this to my kids (16 & 18) once and they were like, “HUH? Why didn’t you just go to Barnes and Nobel?” Gack. My first Library memory was going to the big downtown library with my Grandmother.When I think about this I see the color green. She got me my first library card and the first book I ever took out was “A Sundae for Judy” which I finally found a copy of! But I digress…I was super lucky – even tho the library was in walking distance from my house (a long walk, but what else did we have to do?) the Bookmobile would stop at the grade school RIGHT ACROSS THE STREET FROM MY HOUSE! How cool was that. I loved it. I remember checking out and renewing “To Kill a Mockingbird” over and over for one summer. My summer reading book this year…”When You Are Engulfed in Flames” the new David Sedaris book. Thanks for jogging this memory!

  183. My community did not have a Bookmobile when I was growing up in the late ’60s (we didn’t get bus service until after I left for college) but our little town did have a great library. The book selection was great and I felt so smart and special when I went into the children’s department. I look back and realize it was furnished by Knoll with Saarinen tulip tables and Bertoia wire chairs–kid size. Everything was meant to be sat upon, sprawled across; books were meant to pulled off the shelves and browsed through. And I have loved libraries every since.
    I thought the Mrs. Piggle Wiggle books were especially delicious. On my summer to-read pile are Atkinson’s Case Histories and Lamott’s Plan B. Oh, and P.S.: I too had a metallic blue Sting-Ray with a banana seat (no sparkles, alas, but I had fringe on my handlebars).

  184. Hmmm, no bookmobile because I live in a town that had it’s own public library, and we lived within 3 miles of it.
    However, I have 2 favorite books from childhood:
    1) A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett
    Loved this because Sara Crewe liked dolls and had a great imagination, just like I did!
    2) Shadow Castle by Marian Cockrell
    I checked this out so many times from the school’s library. (I could never remember the author or the title so that my Mom could get me my own copy. I just remembered where it sat on the shelf.) Thank goodness for the internet and Amazon. Soon, my own copy will be on its way so I can share it with my 5 year-old daughter!
    Book I plan to read before this summer is over with:
    Breaking Dawn by Stephenie Meyer.
    This is the 4th and final book of the Twilight series. I know that this is Teen fiction, but I love stories where the characters are so well written that they “come alive.” Plus it has vampires, werewolves and star-crossed lovers. What’s not to love? :)

  185. Oh man. I used to have the same bike. I saved up my allowance and birthday money one dime at a time. We didn’t have a book mobile. My father worked in town and I used to walk over to the library and spend the morning or afternoon in the air conditioning reading the Reader’s Digest, looking at cartoons in the New Yorker or trying to scope out books my mother wouldn’t let me read (like Valley of the Dolls). I loved Dr. Doolittle too but my favorite was Mary Poppins and the various sequels that went along with it. I also loved a book called Snow Treasure by Marie McSwigen about kids smuggling gold out of Norway on their sleds during WWII.
    I’m reading the Age of Jackson by Schlesinger and Knitting Ganseys by Brown-Reisel.

  186. Oh, yeah…I forgot. My banana seat Schwinn was white with monkey bars and 60’s looking flowers on the seat. And Tiger Beat magazine was the best! Any one else have a secret crush on Tony DeFranco? Any one else even know who he is?

  187. My bookmobile came on Saturdays to the drugstore parking lot. I think I had a crush on the librarian. I loved Nancy Drew. I still have a library card and plan to read The Friday Night Knitting Club.

  188. 1. My cousin took me into my first ever book mobile where he let me use his card to check out a book on sharks. I used that book to write a speech that one first prize in the school’s speech contest. My cousin thought that I should give him my trophy (a plaque) since it was his card that got me the book.
    2. My favourite childhood books were the Laura Ingles Wilder series.
    3. I plan on reading the Spiderwick Chronicles. After I gift it to my second son on the event of his twelfth birthday. I figure the video games we also bought him should keep him occupied long enough for me to read it.

  189. I have never used a Bookmobile, but the library system I work for used to have one. This is relevant because while weeding our children’s collection over the past couple of years I keep finding material that was transferred from the bookmobile to the regular collection. Many of these books appear to be from the early days of the bookmobile and have now moved on to a better place (made in to creative “new” books in bookmaking programs).
    One of my favourite chapter books from childhood was The Secret Language – although when the time came to go away for school it was very different.
    By the end of this summer I plan to read “The Book of Old Houses” by Sarah Graves

  190. I also feel the need to come out of lurkdom for books!
    1. My only memory of the bookmobile is a fabulous one! In 1980, I was 10 years old. I wanted to read The Life and Times of Albert Einstein (why yes, I was a giant geek) which was housed in the adult section of the school library. (Brigantine being a very small town, the school library was also the city library at the time.) At age 10, they refused to let me check it out…as I was not an adult. They then refused to let my MOTHER check it out as she was planning on giving it to her 10 year old daughter. (It’s not like we’re talking about porn here folks. It was a biography of Einstein for the love of wool, EINSTEIN!) So, while going to war with the local school board as to why they were being such frellniks about it, she found the local Bookmobile program in Brigantine, NJ and checked it out there. I loved that silver trailer (and my mom for fighting for me!)
    And just to finish out the story, the principal of the school called me into her office one week after I’d gotten the book from the Bookmobile and said I could read the book that SHE’D checked out in her name as my mother and I had been banned from checking it out. I took the book, but refused to read THAT copy, lol. I bet that showed them!
    2. All of the Little House series, but On the Banks of Plum Creek was my favorite one EVER.
    3. I’ve already read 10 or so, but I’m going to finish the Odd Thomas series thus far. I’m getting thru Forever Odd and Brother Odd is next.
    And thanks for the major time suck invention with the pictures yesterday. Most fun of my WHOLE DAY!

  191. My bookmobile memory and my favorite childhood book are completely tied together. We used to go every week — ours was purple (oddly, much like the Todd Parr bookmobile that my son loves to point out in his book). On one of the bottom shelves was a book with w yellow cover that I would check out, read, and return four or five times every summer until the fateful day when my grandmother found me my own copy of that book. The book?
    The Crystal Tree by Jennie D. Lindquist
    I reread it about six months ago and realized that I had, subconsciously, named my son after the male characters in the book. That? Is an amazing connection between the bookmobile and my life now (complete with a library/theatre that my son goes to once a week, though he’s too little yet for his own library card.)
    And I will be reading The Queen of Babble Gets Hitched by Meg Cabot before the end of summer along with Jhumpa Lahiri’s Unaccustomed Earth.

  192. 1. I’ve never been to the bookmobile, and whenever I see one I lament that fact.
    2. Little House In The Big Woods
    3. The Yiddish Policeman’s Union
    I can’t WAIT for the new book!!!

  193. I was commenting to this post even without the contest. You brought me back to my summers in Lexington, KY during the mid-seventies. They were the years I entered the double-digit age bracket and into my teens. I’d ride that same bike (I had a pink one with a bell and handlebar streamers) with the basket on the side to hold as many books as I was permitted to check out for the two weeks between bookmobile visits. They were never enough to make it. And the clothes! My mom sewed us matching culotte and halter top sets in light cottons, I remember one of mine was a yellow gingham with some applique thing on it, I loved it! The librarian was so nice to me, letting me make requests and trying to bring me a variety of books, I read all of the Nancy Drew books, Gone-Away Lake, The Witch of Blackbird Pond, and moved onto Agatha Christie and those gothic romance/mystery novels by, what was her name? Phyllis Whitney? Wow! I just googled her and her website shows that she just passed away this February at the age of 104! The Tolkien books, The Once and Future King, oh man, the list goes on and on.
    What will I read this summer? From the queue: The River King, The Pillars of the Earth, Relic, a bunch. The list is always long.
    Thanks for taking me back!

  194. Oh the memories–no book mobile, but like a lot of others a devotion to the public library.
    My favorite was probably “Pippi in the South Seas” by Astrid Lindgren–Girl Power.
    I would like to read Blood Meridian by Cormac Mccarthy )before it is a movie).

  195. I am too young and too suburban to have had a bookmobile, but I do have very fond memories of the weekly library trip. My mom would pretty much let me get a stack of books as high as I was, and I think I got my first library card as soon as I could write my name. Also, the summer reading prize one year was free personal pizzas from Little Ceasar’s, I think? But they didn’t put a limit on it, so you could just keep turning in the checklist over and over again all summer, as long as you kept reading! I think I pretty much lived on those pizzas that summer, because I never stopped reading.
    One of my favorite books of ever, that I would read over and over again, well, actually it’s three books. The Harper Hall trilogy by Anne McCaffrey. *Sigh* Music and dragons and drama and a really, really strong female lead who doesn’t start out thinking she’s worth anything, but ends up in one of the highest positions in the world, mostly through her own talent with a little luck. Plus, Robinton was hot, in that older, sensitive guy way. Um, nevermind.
    This summer! I have been reading all summer already! Buut, I am currently reading If the Buddha Came to Dinner, by Hale’ Sofia Schatz, which is a really good book about not eating just to eat, but feeding ourselves in a truly nourishing way. The recipes are yummy, and even if you don’t necessarily want to go for all of her kinda hippy dippy ideas, there are some really good core ideas here that make a lot of sense, even to a skeptic like me.

  196. I received my Reading Certificate from the Corpus Christi, TX Public Library when I was 9 years old. I was a bonafide member of The Bookworm Club! For every book you read, you had to tell the librarian what the book was about, she wrote the title down in the official-looking Bookworm Club ledger, and you received a colorful section sticker to put on your bookworm picture (held for safekeeping at the library–this was serious stuff, folks) until you had completed every section of the bookworm with stickers. Then, you received your completed bookworm picture and the coveted Certificate! Yea, I’m a winner (or a bonafide bookworm, as the case may be)!!
    Bookmobile–When we moved to North Texas, our way-far-out new suburb did not have a library, but the Fort Worth Public Library sent the Bookmobile 15 miles out to our local shopping center parking lot every other Saturday. It was heaven on wheels, I tell you. I remember the climb up those steep steps, anticipating what books awaited me. The Bookmobile always hummed and vibrated because the motor was idling the whole time so that the Bookmobile Lady wouldn’t die without heat or air conditioning, depending on the season. Oh, yeah, I was the strutting, proud owner of my very own library card, and I was responsible for keeping track of it at home. (Top dresser, righthand drawer–always.) I either rode my shiny blue Schwinn bike (WITH SPEEDOMETER–Lord, I had class!) or my mother drove me up to the Bookmobile (depending on whether she wanted books for herself or needed to go to the grocery store).
    Favorite Chapter Book–Betsy-Tacy, by Maud Hart Lovelace, the first of the Betsy-Tacy books, written in 1940. I’ve still got the book, and I think my 6-yr.-old granddaughter would enjoy it now. The Bobbsey Twins series, the Little House On The Prairie series, as well as The Black Stallion books were also favorites. I was absolutely going to die if I didn’t get my very own live horse, in addition to shoe skates so that I didn’t have to rent those dorky skates at the local roller rink. I got the skates one Christmas, but I never got the horse, and I miraculously survived without it. (BTW, my granddaughter loves The Keeping Quilt, and her little brother loves Joseph Had A Little Overcoat, both of which I bought for them upon your recommendation.)
    This Summer’s Reading–I’ve already read The Last Lecture, and Walking Across Egypt, and I’m all set to read The Memory Keeper’s Daughter as soon as I finish knitting the A4A Endless Brick Red Shawl.
    Mary G. in Texas

  197. Oh the memories–no book mobile, but like a lot of others a devotion to the public library.
    My favorite was probably “Pippi in the South Seas” by Astrid Lindgren–Girl Power.
    I would like to read Blood Meridian by Cormac Mccarthy )before it is a movie).

  198. I never saw a bookmobile til I was an adult living in Tuscaloosa AL, but as a teenager in upstate NY I worked in the Library from the day after my 14th birthday til I went to college at the marvellous salary of 75 cents an hour.
    I read EVERYTHING that I could get my hands on, but I guess Narnia – the whole series would get my vote for favorite, or the Black Stallion and all of his associates.
    this summer… The Things They Carried about Vietnam and Matisse the Master for the other side of my soul.
    ALso, just finished an Absorba.. it’s on my blog if you care to see. Thanks SO much for the pattern.

  199. I never saw a bookmobile til I was an adult living in Tuscaloosa AL, but as a teenager in upstate NY I worked in the Library from the day after my 14th birthday til I went to college at the marvellous salary of 75 cents an hour.
    I read EVERYTHING that I could get my hands on, but I guess Narnia – the whole series would get my vote for favorite, or the Black Stallion and all of his associates.
    this summer… The Things They Carried about Vietnam and Matisse the Master for the other side of my soul.
    ALso, just finished an Absorba.. it’s on my blog if you care to see. Thanks SO much for the pattern.

  200. Alas, no bookmobile memory – we didn’t have such things when & where I grew up. Sounds like it would have been fun, though!
    My favorite chapter books as a kid were the Bobbsey Twins series – and as an older kid, I loved the Anne of Green Gables series. And I’ve been a reading fiend this summer – I’m on my 8th book for the month of July so far – so, a book I pledge to read is New Moon, by Stephenie Meyer.

  201. Alas, no bookmobile memory – we didn’t have such things when & where I grew up. Sounds like it would have been fun, though!
    My favorite chapter books as a kid were the Bobbsey Twins series – and as an older kid, I loved the Anne of Green Gables series. And I’ve been a reading fiend this summer – I’m on my 8th book for the month of July so far – so, a book I pledge to read is New Moon, by Stephenie Meyer.

  202. We moved in the summer before 7th grade, and I spent a lot of that vacation riding down to the Bookmobile on my bike. My favorite books were any by Betty Cavanna; they were squeaky-clean girl-meets-boy-and-goes-on-a-date stories.
    Many years later my very first real job was library assistant on that same Bookmobile! We went to schools without libraries during the school year and our best run was out to the coast where there were still one room schoolhouses in the little towns.
    Thanks for reawakening these great memories. I think I’ll go find my old postcard of that Bookmobile to scan and write something about it on my blog.
    ~Clair Z.

  203. I first read Little Women when I was 8, and I think I’m going to read it again this summer..

  204. I remember going, and that mile walk mostly uphill to get there, and the way it smelled, and how come they trusted us to bring those books back? Ours was driven by a man, and we didn’t have scary children of the corn patrons like in that last picture. Me and Debbie Dale. (I’m naming names here.)
    Black Beauty.
    The Tain, or maybe The Aeneid. Actually, both, and probably more. Those are just the two due soonest at the library.

  205. 1. We didn’t have a bookmobile in my county. I lived out in the country so the trip to town once per week was a big event and my opportunity to check out 4 books. I pretty much read the whole children’s section and then moved into the more mature part of the library.
    2. One of my favorite books–Gone with the Wind. There was some discussion about whether this book was appropriate for a 12 yr old girl, but I was allowed to check it out finally.
    3. My sister in law just gave me “Stiff”, which is about cadavers, funerals, etc. Sounds a bit odd but she says its great. That’s my summer reading!

  206. My library didn’t have a bookmobile, but my town had a wonderful library when I was a child. (Located in Cerritos, CA, it’s even better now. I could spend all day there, and have tried to do just that on occasion.) In the summertime I would ride my bike just over a mile each way several times a week to fill up my bicycle basket with novels. The library was air-conditioned (our home was not) which gave me an added incentive to head out in the hot summer sun. My cycling route took me over a hill, and if I got going fast enough on the downhill side, I could coast all the way to the intersection where the library sits.
    A favorite chapter book I checked out and read repeatedly was “Lavender-green Magic” by Andre Norton. It was a delight. I am going to read it with my children this summer. Thank you for jogging my reading memory in a wonderful way.
    This summer I am reading the Fitzwilliam Darcy novels by Pamela Aidan. I just finished “An Assembly Such as This” and started “Duty and Desire” today. “These Three Remain” is next up.
    Pride and Prejudice lovers beware . . . if you start these novels, Mr. Darcy will take up much of your knitting time!

  207. My library didn’t have a bookmobile, but my town had a wonderful library when I was a child. (Located in Cerritos, CA, it’s even better now. I could spend all day there, and have tried to do just that on occasion.) In the summertime I would ride my bike just over a mile each way several times a week to fill up my bicycle basket with novels. The library was air-conditioned (our home was not) which gave me an added incentive to head out in the hot summer sun. My cycling route took me over a hill, and if I got going fast enough on the downhill side, I could coast all the way to the intersection where the library sits.
    A favorite chapter book I checked out and read repeatedly was “Lavender-green Magic” by Andre Norton. It was a delight. I am going to read it with my children this summer. Thank you for jogging my reading memory in a wonderful way.
    This summer I am reading the Fitzwilliam Darcy novels by Pamela Aidan. I just finished “An Assembly Such as This” and started “Duty and Desire” today. “These Three Remain” is next up.
    Pride and Prejudice lovers beware . . . if you start these novels, Mr. Darcy will take up much of your knitting time!

  208. I remember walking to the bookmobile, sometimes we could go without our parents. I just loved it the library coming to me and if you asked they would bring books you wanted! Love it! Our book mobile stopped in front of where I went to kindergarten so there was a play area, the metal lead paint kind. The walk back we could take the “little” sidewalk that went between two houses one that had a huge german shepherd that I am convinced ate one of my handknit by grandma mittens.
    Favorite chapter books: Anne of Green Gables or any from that series
    Great books I have read this summer: Simple Prosperity by David Wann, Wintersmith by Terry Pratchett (love the witches)

  209. I do not have any bookmobile memories. But I do have very fond memories of walking to the local public library with my Grandmother. And later walking and riding my bike on my own there. I have to pick a single book?! The first that comes to mind is the Ramona books by Beverly Cleary. Read them all. Loved them all. And a book I plan to read this summer… Twenty Wishes… I’m a sucker for both knitting novels and books written in the PNW. This is both. And perfect summer fluff.

  210. 1. I have to comment on this… I don’t have a memory about an actual bookmobile, but my brothers used to tell stories in the summers about the three of us, and in the stories, they always escaped the villains on the USS Enterprise… I was always driving the bookmobile and got caught. (I may have been a bit of a bookworm.) To this day I can’t look at a bookmobile without thinking of the dramatic endings of every single one of their stories – the two of them zipping off into the stars with Captain Kirk and Spock while they laughed and high-fived over my plight. They still think this is hilarious.
    2. Anne of Green Gables
    3. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (it’s my annual summer read..) There may be others but they’ll be accidental, not on purpose.

  211. A book I lurve lurve lurve and have for years: Roald Dahl’s Matilda. A book that I plan to read before the summer’s out: Trollbridge, a rock’n’roll fairytale by Jane Yolen.

  212. 1. No bookmobile memories, but I do remember reading to earn free Pizza Hut pan pizzas in the Book It program.
    2. Any Babysitter Club book was a must read during my childhood.
    3. Have to finish by the end of summer – Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex by Mary Roach

  213. Dear Ann and Kay,
    We did not have a bookmobile, but I used to ride my blue Schwinn ten-speed to the Butte County library during the summer. It was hot, more than 90 degrees most days, but I just HAD to have something new to read. The library was cool, and quiet despite the tile floors, and smelled slightly dusty, and I would sit down and browse through a ‘Mad’ magazine and wait to cool off and stop sweating before browsing through the two aisles that made up the children/tween/young adult section. I remember wishing that the shelves went higher, so I might have an excuse to use one of those fantastic round black stools that the librarians all used.
    Sometimes I’d ask the librarians for suggestions of good books, and sometimes I’d look for other books by the same author, and sometimes I’d just browse.
    I didn’t often ask the librarians for suggestions, though; I’d earned a girl scout badge at that very library, so they all knew that I had mastered both the card catalogue and the Dewey decimal system, and they would make sure my skills were still fresh when they gave me book titles.
    Choices made – carefully, so I could maximize both the space in my backpack and the number of books I was taking, I would get back on the Schwinn, weighed down, and ride home.
    Favorite book – not really a childhood one, but one that I’d always read in the summer: The Wind in the Willows.
    This summer: Hullabaloo in the Guava Orchard

  214. I live in the same neighborhood where I grew up. The library is just a mile down the road. In the summer (both my parents worked) my best friend and I would meander down the middle of the road on the dotted lines, not one car passing us. I remember seeing the bookmobile and wondering why it didn’t come right to my door instead of us trooping down the road (it was downhill all the way) to the library. The library was air conditioned, our house wasn’t. They had a water fountain with ice cold water. By the time we arrived, we headed straight for the water fountain. It was the best water ever. Then over to the stacks to linger as long as possible to enjoy the cool air of the window unit air conditioners. What luxury. I can still remember that book smell – a touch of mildew and that old paper smell. We would make our selections – we were allowed ten books. That was about as many as my arms could carry back up hill all the way home in the heat and humidity – hoping someone that we knew would drive by and pick us up. That book mobile was parked around the back of the library until a few years ago. They finally built a senior center back there – maybe the book mobile is behind the senior cente r. I guess I’ll never now. And that road – well, it’s bumper to bumper traffic from sunup to sundown with people driving 55 plus in the 35 mph speed zone trying to get from one place to the other. I wouldn’t dare to even try and walk down the side of the road!And our library was voted one of the ten best in the nation…
    My favorite childhood books, well, all the Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys, plus Misty of Chincotegue was a real popular one – you were really something if you could scoop a copy before anyone else, and A Wrinkle in Time.
    This summer I would like to read The Kite Runner.
    Really enjoy your blog. Thanks.
    Barbara in MD

  215. Dear Ann and Kay,
    We did not have a bookmobile, but I used to ride my blue Schwinn ten-speed to the Butte County library during the summer. It was hot, more than 90 degrees most days, but I just HAD to have something new to read. The library was cool, and quiet despite the tile floors, and smelled slightly dusty, and I would sit down and browse through a ‘Mad’ magazine and wait to cool off and stop sweating before browsing through the two aisles that made up the children/tween/young adult section. I remember wishing that the shelves went higher, so I might have an excuse to use one of those fantastic round black stools that the librarians all used.
    Sometimes I’d ask the librarians for suggestions of good books, and sometimes I’d look for other books by the same author, and sometimes I’d just browse.
    I didn’t often ask the librarians for suggestions, though; I’d earned a girl scout badge at that very library, so they all knew that I had mastered both the card catalogue and the Dewey decimal system, and they would make sure my skills were still fresh when they gave me book titles.
    Choices made – carefully, so I could maximize both the space in my backpack and the number of books I was taking, I would get back on the Schwinn, weighed down, and ride home.
    Favorite book – not really a childhood one, but one that I’d always read in the summer: The Wind in the Willows.
    This summer: Hullabaloo in the Guava Orchard

  216. A book that’s stayed with me since I read it as a child is “Half Magic” — a wonderful story about a talisman that would give you HALF of what you wished for. (Wishing for a million dollars and getting half of it would be okay…but wishing to be invisible and ending up ghostly, as one of the characters does, isn’t so great.) And before the summer’s over, I plan to read “Zia,” the sequel to another childhood favorite, “Island of the Blue Dolphins.”
    By the way, if you’re serious about the Stingray, you might want to check out the classified ads at the Schwinn site. That’s how I got mine!

  217. I could walk to my library, so no bookmobile for me! And yes, I was one of those who always had my nose in a book. I know I read the entire Lord of the Rings set in grade 7, and it totally changed my life. Read it almost every year through my teens, too.
    This summer, I’m hoping to read the Stephanie Plum series because the Karma Yarn Swap gang on ravelry is totally recommending them and I’ve never read them.

  218. 1)I grew up out in the country of a small town with no book mobile :( It sounds fun.
    2) Favorite childhood chapter book: Any Nancy Drew Mystery! Or perhaps Starring Sally J Freeman as Herself by Judy Blume.
    3)Next on my reading list is Death Walked In by Carolyn Hart.

  219. The bookmobile didn’t come in to town, it was for the children out in the County. We could walk to the Margaret Morrison Elementary School library two mornings a week in the summer and check out books. Ten at a time. A number that, for this little bookworm, didn’t cut it. But, the nice elderly librarians who must have been all of, say, 40 years old, let me check out ten books, carry them outside to the playground and read them, return them, check out ten more, rinse and repeat, until right before closing time, when I had to take my last 10 home. Thank you nice librarian ladies, you made a little girl very happy.
    My favorite chapter book was probably The Secret Garden. I still own the copy of it my mother bought at a book sale at the Margaret Morrison Elementary School.
    A book that I am very much looking forward to reading this summer is Marion Keyes’ This Charming Man.

  220. 1) I don’t remember there ever being a Bookmobile around when I was a child, but I do remember being taken to the public library A LOT. I loved being able to choose however many and whatever books caught my fancy; it was almost better than a trip to a toy store. The library had murals of fairy tale scenes painted in the children’s section, which I also loved.
    2) The Anne of Green Gables books were my favorites. Also A Little Princess, by Frances Hodgson Burnett.
    3)What God Hath Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815-1848, by Daniel Walker Howe. (And maybe the Anne of Green Gables books, for about the 1,000th time.)

  221. I work at a public library that has the restored original bookmobile from the library system. It is a 1929 Model AA Ford named Pegasus. Also I see the current bookmobile every day leaving on its route. My favorite book from childhood is “The Boxcar Children” by Gertrude Chandler Warner. Four orphaned children make an abandoned boxcar their home before finding their grandfather and moving in with him. They solve a series of mysteries. I am currently reading “When you are engulfed in flames” by David Sedaris.

  222. We didn’t have a bookmobile in our town (Foxboro, MA in the late 70’s) but I have fond memories of our summer reading program. You got a sticker on a chart for every book summary you turned in and it was VERY competitive. My favorite was the Nancy Drew series. I never did win but I enjoyed the thrill of the pursuit! I have four children home with me this summer so I can’t hope to aspire to finish a book this summer, maybe a magazine :)

  223. We didn’t have a bookmobile in our town (Foxboro, MA in the late 70’s) but I have fond memories of our summer reading program. You got a sticker on a chart for every book summary you turned in and it was VERY competitive. My favorite was the Nancy Drew series. I never did win but I enjoyed the thrill of the pursuit! I have four children home with me this summer so I can’t hope to aspire to finish a book this summer, maybe a magazine :)

  224. Bookmobile-no such thing where I lived
    Chapter book- The bridge to Terabithia and Where the Red Fern Grows (or any old Reader’s Digest i could my hands on at my grand parent’s house)
    My favorite book of my sons’-Click Clack Moo-Cows that Type!! by Doreen Cronin (love all her books!)

  225. 1) we didn’t have a bookmobile because our town was too small.
    2) my favorite chapter book was “Little House in the Big Woods” by Laura Ingalls Wilder. The fact that I grew up in Minnesota makes books like this interesting to me even now. There’s something about growing up on a really cold prairie that makes you feel connected to others who have as well.
    3) I plan to read “Emma” by Jane Austen in August.

  226. 1. No such luck with the bookmobile. But I would squee when RIF came to the library in school.
    2. My favorite books when I was younger were the B is for Betsy series. I would bring them home and just refuse to put them down for anything. I still remember the red cover and how it felt. And I loved the pictures. And the way the pages were darker than other books, probably from age. Oh to go back and get to read those again for the first time.
    3. As for summer reading, I just finished Duma Key by Stephen King. I am in the midst of Wicked by Gregory Maguire, The first Chronicles of Amber by Roger Zelaney, and A Swiftly Tilting Planet by Madeline L’Engle. I usually read 3 or 4 at a time. Except for Stephen King books or Harry Potter. Those I devote my whole attention to until finished.
    Thanks for the contest and questions. It’s always great remembering the good things.
    :)

  227. 1. Oh how I wish I had a bookmobile. I’m a librarian and I wish I was out driving around, bringing books to children, reading stories to children in the park. Sadly, instead I sit in a small dark room (some of the stereotypes are true) and write reports for The Board and work on budgets. Ick!
    2. My favourite book as a child was Anne of Green Gables. I read and re-read it, I went through 3 copies because they kept falling apart.
    3. Book that I want to read this summer – Touchstone by Laurie R. King.

  228. We didn’t have a Bookmobile, but I have vivid memories of working my way down the library’s shelf of Nancy Drew books. It was the bottom shelf and stretched out as long as summer itself.
    A favorite chapter book from the days of Nancy Drew is Ballet Shoes, by Noel Streatfeild. This summer I will finish Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day by Winifred Watson. I am reading it now and it is shaping up to be the Best Book Ever.
    Cheers!

  229. I don’t have any bookmobile memories, but I have a few good ones from the library down the street. Since those don’t count, I’ll give you a favorite book chapter. I happen to have my copy of “Anne of Green Gables” handy and I remember having particular fondness for the chapter “A Good Imagination Gone Wrong.” I know that’s happened to me too many times to count. Before the end of the summer I hope to read “The Tender Bar” and maybe I’ll re-read “Anne of Green Gables” too.

  230. I don’t have any bookmobile memories, but I have a few good ones from the library down the street. Since those don’t count, I’ll give you a favorite book chapter. I happen to have my copy of “Anne of Green Gables” handy and I remember having particular fondness for the chapter “A Good Imagination Gone Wrong.” I know that’s happened to me too many times to count. Before the end of the summer I hope to read “The Tender Bar” and maybe I’ll re-read “Anne of Green Gables” too.

  231. I don’t have any bookmobile memories, but I have a few good ones from the library down the street. Since those don’t count, I’ll give you a favorite book chapter. I happen to have my copy of “Anne of Green Gables” handy and I remember having particular fondness for the chapter “A Good Imagination Gone Wrong.” I know that’s happened to me too many times to count. Before the end of the summer I hope to read “The Tender Bar” and maybe I’ll re-read “Anne of Green Gables” too.

  232. I don’t have any bookmobile memories, but I have a few good ones from the library down the street. Since those don’t count, I’ll give you a favorite book chapter. I happen to have my copy of “Anne of Green Gables” handy and I remember having particular fondness for the chapter “A Good Imagination Gone Wrong.” I know that’s happened to me too many times to count. Before the end of the summer I hope to read “The Tender Bar” and maybe I’ll re-read “Anne of Green Gables” too.

  233. Dang, I don’t know what happened! Sorry for the quadruple post. I wasn’t trying to get extra entries – honest!

  234. We had a bookmobile in Chattanooga, Tennessee in the 1960’s. I was not a child but a young adult, but I loved the bookmobile. It was not shaped like the one in your picture, but a long bus. It hit the shopping center close to my home, and I would visit it at almost every day scheduled.
    My favorite chapter book was “Where the Red Fern Grows.” I would read it to my students during their rest period, every year, and the most difficult part was to keep from crying while reading aloud. Anyone who hasn’t read the book, must do so at their first opportunity. The sad thing is that the author didn’t write anything else.
    My reading task for this summer is World Without End, by Ken Follett. It has over 1000 pages and is an historical novel set in the 1300’s in England.

  235. 1. We had no bookmobile. Our town was small enough to walk to the library, or bike if you were so inclined. The library was at the top of a steep hill, so if you could get your bike up to the top you were guaranteed an awesome ride back down.
    2. The Wonderful Flight to the Mushroom Planet, by Eleanor Cameron. I am pretty sure this is why I like science fiction so much now. The book is decades older than I am. I found it in the Discard Sale rack at the library after checking it out and then getting mad when I had to return it because I liked it so much. The book was out of print so there was no hope of finding it elsewhere. The check-out stamp ticket had shown that nobody had checked it out in the 6 years before me. Did a clerk over-hear me? I don’t know, but I’m glad I had it then and have it now.
    3. Wastelands: Stories of the Apocalypse, ed. John Joseph Adams. I just got done with A Canticle for Leibowitz by Walter M. Miller and I’d like to continue the end-of-the-world streak.

  236. 1. The bookmobile stopped at the end of our road, so I could only haul 4 books per week back to the house….I did beg for them to give me door to door service!
    2. Harriet the Spy by Louise Fitzhugh, a must-read for every tomboy.
    3. Next on the list is The Enchantress of Florence by Salman Rushdie.
    Thanks for the contest and the memories.

  237. I grew up in the suburbs of Chicago, so no Bookmobile there, but we did have a swell library. It’s still magnificent, a true monument to literacy, but I don’t live there anymore and our current small-town library doesn’t offer Bookmobile services. Yes, it’s that small. Still, the upside is that I can walk in and find the newest of the new bestsellers sitting there waiting to be checked out while in the big town just south of us, you have to put your name on a waiting list and wait weeks for your turn. Bah.
    My favorite childhood book? That’s easy:
    Twig, by Elizabeth Orton Jones, recently republished by Purple House Press. It’s the story of a little girl whose garden is the home of wonderful little fairy-people. Wonderful story, just wonderful! A few years ago I tracked down a copy via Interlibrary Loan (a great service!) and reread it as an adult– still a wonderful story! I guess I had great literary taste as a youngster! After nosing around the Internet, I finally tracked down a personal copy of Twig– I decided that since I enjoyed it SO much, I had to have my own copy!
    And what do I plan to read this summer? I just finished Peony in Love by Lisa See last night. It’s the story of a lovesick girl who dies (oh, did I just say that? Sorry– that was an unexpected turn in the novel…) just before her marriage to her true love. There are lots of twists and turns in this book, so you should really, heh heh, check it out! Lisa See also wrote Snow Flower and the Secret Fan– an amazing book (yes, if you can only read one, I’d read the latter, imho. Up next on my nightstand is Rise and Shine by the fabulous Anna Quindlen.
    Love the blog.
    Great idea for a contest! Hope you choose me!!!

  238. 1. The bookmobile didn’t visit us, because we had a town library with gen-u-ine manufactured fossils in the main display.
    2. Me, I remember reading every Nancy Drew the library had. For my children, there are so many, I’ll say A Toad for Tuesday by Russell E. Erickson and Larry Di Fiori
    3. Labyrinth by Kate Mosse

  239. 1) We had a local library so unfortunately no bookmobile.
    2) One of my favourite childhood books was Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell. I spent days reading on my grandmother’s porch and when I ran out of my own books, I would move on to her Readers Digest Condensed Books and then her large print books.
    3) I plan to read The Vanishing Act of Esme Lennox (my book club’s next read).

  240. 1) We had a local library so unfortunately no bookmobile.
    2) One of my favourite childhood books was Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell. I spent days reading on my grandmother’s porch and when I ran out of my own books, I would move on to her Readers Digest Condensed Books and then her large print books.
    3) I plan to read The Vanishing Act of Esme Lennox (my book club’s next read).

  241. 1. As a child of the 70s-80s the closest thing we had to your beloved Bookmobile was RIF (Reading Is Fundamental). One day every year, each class got to go to the library and pick one free book for keeps. It felt like Christmas. I could’ve spent all day in there. The tables were covered in brand new books just waiting to be picked up and flipped through. I can still remember how all of those amazing new books made library smell. Mmm. I’d carry 2 or 3 around with me until I could decide which one I wanted to keep. (Coincidentally, I almost always wound up picking that year’s Guiness Book of World Records. Huh.)
    2. As a kid, my favorite chapter books were all of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Little House books, as well as the Nancy Drew serial books.
    3. This summer I’m working my way through our library’s Best American Short Stories anthologies – top quality reads that are easy to pick up and plow through!

  242. I loved your memories about the bookmobile. I get to drive ours for our local library and it’s so much fun to see the childrens and grownups faces light up when they come onboard. I remember reading the Alfred Hitchcock mystery series “The Three Investigators” and trying to solve them before they did. Never happened. A few years ago my mom gave me a file of all my childhood papers and in there a ‘moonwalk’ footprint certificate saying I had completed my ‘walk to the moon’ from the library. Good memories one and all.

  243. Seeing the photos and reading about your experience brought back a repressed emotion that I will call “Bookmobile Envy”. I was a kid at the same time as you and also remember being encouraged to read during the summer. But I didn’t have a bookmobile. Didn’t need one because of the city library that we could go to. But, I saw it parked in the back and heard rumors of it traveling around to the “country kids”. That always sounded fun to me and now the photos have proven it. I managed to read though and still have my own copy of Clara Barton, a short biograpy written for kids. I found her smart, beautiful and I thought it was exciting and wonderful that she went into battle areas to help the soldiers. I plan to read “Three Cups Of Tea” by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin.

  244. i don’t have any bookmobile memories but i have lots of library memories. when i was in maybe 2nd grade, i loved library hour. i think it was wednesday afternoon when the whole class would go to the school library to check out books for the week. when we checked out our books, we’d come back to the classroom and have 30 minutes or so to read. then when i got a little older (and we had moved) every week, my best friend judy and i would ride our bikes to the town library. i think that’s when i checked out “war and peace” with every intention of reading it. i was a little precocious.
    when i wasn’t trying to read tolstoy i remember reading the entire Betsy series and stalking the shelves to make sure i read each and every one. i was a little compulsive.
    i visited my local library last night and checked out ken follett’s “world without end.” i plan on starting it tonight.

  245. We didn’t have a bookmobile but I lived in walking distance to the library and my Mom would take me for new books when I would tell her “my eyes are thirsty”.
    My favorite books as a child were the Dr. Dolittle series (which I still have in the nightstand in my bedroom at the marvelous age of 51!)
    Thanks so much for the opportunity to win your new book.
    Hugs,
    Paula

  246. We didn’t have a bookmobile but I lived in walking distance to the library and my Mom would take me for new books when I would tell her “my eyes are thirsty”.
    My favorite books as a child were the Dr. Dolittle series (which I still have in the nightstand in my bedroom at the marvelous age of 51!)
    Thanks so much for the opportunity to win your new book.
    Hugs,
    Paula

  247. 1. no bookmobile! unfortunate. but at my elementary school we filled out paper gold doubloons with the titles/authors/number of pages for every book we read and dropped in into a pirate-y treasure chest for the chance to win something in a weekly raffle. i read like crazy but i never won, boo!
    2. Little Witch by Anna Elizabeth Bennett
    3. Foundation by Isaac Asimov (I may not get to the whole trilogy this summer, but the first one counts, right?)

  248. Oh my, I remember Shavers. And the bookmobile–I recall that Omaha’s was pinky beige and brown–was my introduction to lusting after my very own RV. Of course, today I’d fill it with books, fabric and yarn. Sewing machine, spinning wheel, loom, ibuprofen . . .
    Willa Cather Library was a refuge within walking distance during my elementary years of the early 60s. For one thing, it was air conditioned and our house was not. I loved to sit cross-legged on the modernish lime vinyl upholstered chairs that were wide enough for me and my stack of books. Had to earn my Summer Reading Club certificate to be presented at school during the first week after vacation. After Labor Day. As it should be.
    What I long for now is the complete solitude I felt in that little chilled corner of the world. I could go back to that branch of the library to check something out, but it just wouldn’t be the same. I’m glad for the refuge of the memory, though. I can smell it, too.
    The memories of the book titles blur. They’ve been replaced with my kids’ favorites. Adam and Ann squeezed onto the vinyl chair with me while I wasn’t looking. Thank goodness.

  249. Oh my, I remember Shavers. And the bookmobile–I recall that Omaha’s was pinky beige and brown–was my introduction to lusting after my very own RV. Of course, today I’d fill it with books, fabric and yarn. Sewing machine, spinning wheel, loom, ibuprofen . . .
    Willa Cather Library was a refuge within walking distance during my elementary years of the early 60s. For one thing, it was air conditioned and our house was not. I loved to sit cross-legged on the modernish lime vinyl upholstered chairs that were wide enough for me and my stack of books. Had to earn my Summer Reading Club certificate to be presented at school during the first week after vacation. After Labor Day. As it should be.
    What I long for now is the complete solitude I felt in that little chilled corner of the world. I could go back to that branch of the library to check something out, but it just wouldn’t be the same. I’m glad for the refuge of the memory, though. I can smell it, too.
    The memories of the book titles blur. They’ve been replaced with my kids’ favorites. Adam and Ann squeezed onto the vinyl chair with me while I wasn’t looking. Thank goodness.

  250. Oh, the Bookmobile! It used to come to my elementary school every other Saturday during the summer. I had to load up on A LOT of books, because two weeks is an eternity to a bookworm. It must have been when I was in the 7th or 8th grade, because as I recall, there was a lot of Phyllis A. Whitney and Jean Plaidy.
    When I was younger, about 4th grade, I think, I spent the summer in Bakersfield with my aunt (my dad had a heart attack in May that year, and we kids were packed off to auntie’s so the house would be quiet). I cruised through all the Little House books that summer, earning “gold” nuggets from the library’s children’s program. The Little House books were my all-time childhood favorite. I think that’s why I still knit socks on dpns. Laura would have never magic looped!
    This summer I’m supposed to be reading the Lemon Tree, but I think I’ll be listening to it on iPod while I knit.

  251. Oh my favorite chapter book would have to be “The Phantom Tollbooth”. Oh how I love that book…must go find it a re-read. I was looking for something to do this afternoon.

  252. I had a seersucker shorts set that my mom sewed for me. The top was pink stripes on one half and dark gray on the other, and the shorts were the reverse. There was ribbon with pink flowers on it where the two halves met on the shirt. I loved it.
    1) We had a Bookmobile when we first moved to South Jersey, because they were still building things (like our church, and the library) – it was a very new town. I discovered my favorite book there, then lost it because it wasn’t there after that, and I couldn’t remember the name or author to request it. I found it again many years later, in a “real” library after we moved. Now I own 2 copies (because, you know, it might get lost again). And it was…
    2) Enchantress from the Stars, by Sylvia Louise Engdahl
    3) I’m saving “Beloved Exile,” by Parke Godwin, for my vacation next month.
    Thanks for the post – I’ve read every one of the comments, seen lots of my favorite books, and been reminded of others. All great fun.

  253. 1. No bookmobile memory. Thankfully, we always lived pretty close to the library.
    2. Favorite chapter book was hands down On the Banks of Plum Creek by Laura Ingalls Wilder. I read most of the Little House books more than once, but this one was my favorite.
    3. Book I plan to read this summer: The Six Wives of Henry VIII by Allison Wier. I was into the Tudors long before Cinemax.
    Thanks for the opportunity! Can’t wait to see your new book!

  254. Well, I had no Bookmoblie – nothing as colourful as you, I’m afraid – but my dad took me to the Hamilton Public Library every Saturday afternoon when I was young, and it instilled in me a tradition so strong I would, as a teenager, LEAVE MY BOYFRIEND BEHIND while I walked to the Dundas Library – this was especially important during the summer Book Worm Club, when you could come away with a button, or, be still my heart, a poster, proclaiming you as a book worm! Why, yes, I did have quite a collection… thanks for asking
    My two absolute favourite books were Anne of Green Gables and Little Women, both of which I took out from the library so often that if I close my eyes, I can mentally walk to their shelves, pull them off, and smell their pages.
    This summer’s reading includes The Chronicles of Narnia, The Lord of The Rings and Anne of Green Gables… what can I say? I’m a traditionalist from way back…

  255. The bookmobile is my earliest memory of going to the library. I remember it would come once a week in the evenings and I’d go with my mom and sister. It always amazed me that there were so many books in it. On the way home, we would always stop for ice cream. I am now a librarian and I always get excited when I see a bookmobile.
    My favorite chapter book, was actually my first “Clara and the book wagon” (I’m sensing a theme)
    I plan on reading “Confessions of a Teen Sleuth” a parody of Nancy Drew as she get older and marries Ned Nickerson.

  256. Am I too young for the Bookmobile? I do know that I spent every summer competing for the title of “most books read in a summer”! I was a real bookworm. I’ve been heading to the library every week watching my first reader earn his points for reading. It’s one of my proudest moments as a mom.
    As a kid, I LOVED… The Mouse And The Motercycle. As for a book this summer…my goal is to finish The Mouse and The Motercycle. It’s my current read aloud for the little ones.

  257. 1. A bookmobile memory — we usually drove the three miles into town, combining a trip to the library (vintage Carnegie) and the swimming pool. But there was a bookmobile that stopped just 3/4 of a mile from our house at the corner of Lateral A and West Wapato Road. One summer, in addition to certificates, we could win pumpkin seeds, and there was a prize for the biggest pumpkin! Truly a country library district.
    2. A Wrinkle in Time, by Madeleine L’Engle, was a favorite of mine. Also vintage Nancy Drew — complete with frocks and the roadster.
    3. I hope to finish Leif Enger’s new book, So Brave, Young, and Handsome.

  258. 1)I wish I had a book mobile memory.I can’t recall why but the book mobile didn’t service my area.Iknow we had one, but…..
    2)My utterly favorite book from childhood is, and will always be, The Last Unicorn.I was even lucky enough to find a signed copy when I was wondering in a used bookstorethis past spring. It was awesome.
    3)hhmmm….well i have already worked through a lengthy list so far…hhmmmm. I would like to get through Jane Erye. I keep starting it every few years since middle school.Myabe this will be it’s year;p

  259. 1)I wish I had a book mobile memory.I can’t recall why but the book mobile didn’t service my area.Iknow we had one, but…..
    2)My utterly favorite book from childhood is, and will always be, The Last Unicorn.I was even lucky enough to find a signed copy when I was wondering in a used bookstorethis past spring. It was awesome.
    3)hhmmm….well i have already worked through a lengthy list so far…hhmmmm. I would like to get through Jane Erye. I keep starting it every few years since middle school.Myabe this will be it’s year;p

  260. 1. Unfortunately, I don’t have a bookmobile memory. I’ve always lived within walking distance of the library, I’m feeling deprived.
    2. A favorite book from my childhood was Little Women.
    3. A book I’m reading this summer is Death of a Ghost by Margery Allingham.
    Thanks for the contest!

  261. 1)As far as I know, Burlington, MA didn’t have a bookmobile when I was growing up… However, every Sunday afternoon my family would drive to Harvard Square, in Cambridge MA. We’d have ice cream, go to Out of Town News (where my mother would buy European sewing and knitting magazines) and go to several bookstores. One of my clearest early memories is having my parents tell me I’d eaten my ice cream neatly enough to be allowed to touch the books!
    2) Too many favorites! All of the Doctor Doolittle books, all of Marguerite Henry’s horse books, all the Black Stallion books, the Oz books, Caddie Woodlawn, Little House….
    3) Omnivore’s Dilemma

  262. Our bookmobile was usually mobile only during the school year. It would make a weekly stop at each of the schools, and every kid would rush in, hoping that a Mad Magazine was on the shelf! During the summer, I begged my mom to take me to the library, where I would check out several weeks worth of books at a time.
    My favorite childhood read – The Little House series
    To read yet this summer – (I have it on reserve at the library, I’m #18 in line, so it might not get here in time for summer) The Art of Racing in the Rain

  263. 1. The Ella Canavan grade school had a small library, but it held none of the allure of the Bookmobile. It came every Tuesday, or maybe Thursday, and each class would have their allotted 15 minutes. You’d climb out of the heat of the asphalt parking lot into the cool interior and your eyes would have to adjust. I had to have a note from my teacher saying I could get books from the older grade shelves. I felt like a celebrity.
    2. Any of the Black Stallion books – The Black Stallion, The Black Stallion Returns, The Black Stallion’s Sulky Colt, you get the picture. Oh, and Misty of Chincoteaque, of course.
    3. Knit with Courage, Live with Hope, by Annie Modesitt. I’m so fortunate to have received a review copy from her.

  264. My town did not have a bookmobile but I pretty much lived at the library, especially during the summer, alternating with the city pool. I loved all mysteries and still read them a lot. My kids are voracious readers of many more genres. One likes a lot of fantasy, including Harry Potter, Diane Wynn Jones, Tamara Pierce. The other’s overall favorite series is the Narnia books. This summer I am very much enjoying reading the Philip Craig Martha’s Vineyard series, the next of which is Vineyard Blues.

  265. I recall a bookmobile from back in the early 60’s, but I don’t think I went to it except once or twice. One of my favorite childhood books (what the heck, still is!) was A Little Princess, and anything with horses or dogs. Now I am reading James Michener’s Space, and want to finish it in the next couple weeks. I’d never read it, but a friend lent it to me and now I am hopelessly drawn to it.

  266. 1. A Bookmobile memory if you have one.
    Kay, my favorite Bookmobile memory concerns a book I had been checking out for my mother. I was a youngster and my mother was a working mom (she was a widow). I would walk to the Bookmobile and check out my book and check out Lady Chatterly’s Lover for my mother. She wasn’t a fast reader because she was very busy working full time and doing all the things a mother does. Well, one day someone noticed that I was checking out a rather colorful book and that I was a child. That wasn’t allowed. Sadly, my mom never got to finish it, but it makes for a pleasant memory.
    3. The title of a book you plan to read before the end of the summer of 2008.
    A Morbid Taste for Bones by Ellis Peters

  267. 1. Well, no bookmobile for me, but we did have an annual used book drive and sale at my elementary school. One year, I was probably third grade, I bought a book called “Adventures in Cactus Land” which I read nearly every month for a long time. I loved it. It was all about exotic (to little Ohioan me) desert animals like roadrunners and armadillos. At a later book drive, my mom, not knowing my love of this book, gave it back to the school to be sold again. I asked about the book the week after the sale, and was devastated that it was gone, never to be seen again. And I complained to my mom for the following, oh, twenty years or so.
    Guess what she eventually found on Ebay, a couple of years ago. Oh yes, I am now the proud owner of another copy of “Adventures in Cactus Land”, which can now pass on to my kids, along with the whole sad story. Happy story, I guess, now.
    2. So many, hard to choose. I really loved “Bunnicula” though, and the sequel, “Howliday Inn”.
    3. “Collapse” by Jared Diamond. Not exactly light summer fare, but interesting stuff.

  268. The area I live in now is running a bookmobile for the kids this summer, and I’m very jealous, I missed the bookmobile phenomenon as a kid. I had to beg my mom to buy books all the time. I remember reading a lot of books, but one I read over and over was “Eight Cousins” by Louisa May Alcott. For some reason I never read “Little Women,” I know, take me out back and shoot me; but I loved the cousins. This summer I’ve got several books planned to read, but after my current book, I’m itching to read “The Wild Trees: A Story of Passion and Daring” by Richard Preston. It’s about people who climb the world’s largest and tallest trees for the same reason Magellan sailed; that ‘what’s over there?’ feeling.

  269. What fun! I wish we had a bookmobile in my ‘burbs. When I was a kid, we had the Scholastic flyers, in which you could conveniently order all of your newest scholastic books! I of course, always left school with a backpack full. I’m not much of a reader these days, but I am being tempted by the Twilight series of books by a gal at work and another blogger. Perhaps I will give that love of a good series a shot again.

  270. What fun! I wish we had a bookmobile in my ‘burbs. When I was a kid, we had the Scholastic flyers, in which you could conveniently order all of your newest scholastic books! I of course, always left school with a backpack full. I’m not much of a reader these days, but I am being tempted by the Twilight series of books by a gal at work and another blogger. Perhaps I will give that love of a good series a shot again.

  271. My all time favorite book is The Silver Nutmeg by Palmer Brown and I recently discovered the prequel to this book and borrowed it from the library to read. It explained things I had wondered about.
    I have no bookmobile memory because we had a real library in the little place I grew up. It was an really neat old house that had been donated and I loved to walk the creaking hardwood floor back to the shelves were all my favorites resided. There was also a huge wax plant that seems to bloom continuously and I was fascinated with it. Every summer there was a reading club and you got stickers on a sheet for each book you read and turned in a short ‘book report’ for. The kid in each grade who read the most books won a prize – a book! I won at least 3 years in a row from what I remember. I bet I still have all those stickered sheets somewhere in storage. Unfortunately I don’t read much anymore and the only book I hope to finish soon is actually the first Mason Dixon book. I’ve only skimmed through looking at the pictures so far I bout snorted when I read about letting company see you knitted an entire bedspread because they already know you are crazy! Too true!!!

  272. 1. No bookmobile mem’ries. Sorry. I went to the public library and lots of used bookstores. Stacks and stacks of Nancy Drew. Stacks.
    2. My favorite chapter book (and I had many) was “Fifteen” by Beverly Cleary. I remember rereading this one numerous times. Sappy. Heartwarming. Romantic. I was a goner.
    3.Dang, I just finished the last Jan Karon novel or I’d write that down. Ummm, something from the Posie Gets Cozy sidebar, perhaps? Maybe Little Heathens: Hard Times and High Spirits on an Iowa Farm During the Great Depression by Mildred Armstrong Kalish.
    Or maybe French Spirits: A House, a Village, and a Love Affair in Burgundy by Jeffrey Greene.
    Either one sounds good.

  273. I didn’t use the bookmobile because we had a Carnegie Library in my hometown, adult books upstair and children’s books downstairs. When I was in sixth grade I had special permission to check out adult books, that meant alot to me. I loved the Laura Ingalls Wilder books which I checked out regularly and my grandma gave me a copy of Little Women that I reread many many times. I plan to read People of the Book by Geraldine Brooks before the summer is over.
    Thanks for a great blog, I really enjoy your eclectic mix of ideas. Thanks for showing me Matt Harding.

  274. I am over in Australia and don’t know if I am allowed to enter your competition.
    Anyway my favourite books from childhood are an Australian series callled the Billabong books by Mary Grant Bush. This is a whole series of books about Norah and her brother, Jim and their friends and life on a cattle station in outback Australia.
    The book I really want to read soon, is of course, ‘Mason-Dixon Knitting – Outside the Line’.

  275. What a great set of questions!
    1. I have barely any memories of the Bookmobile. My town had one, but I think it mostly went to nursing homes and the like. The few times it ever came to our street, we were always disappointed that there were so few kid’s books. And my mom got cranky because we were so excited about the Bookmobile, even though she took us to the darned library EVERY WEEK.
    2. There’s a million favorite chapter books, but my vavorite obscure one is “Can I Get There by Candlelight?” One of my favorites, and I tracked down a copy for my daughter, and now it’s one of her’s too.
    3. In Defense of Food by Michael Pollan.
    So what are your answers?

  276. Alas, no bookmobile memory for me. I did go to a parochial school that had a fairly small library…which I proceeded to read in almost its entirety (I admit it, I skipped the old bibliographies of saints…). I, too, would rather read than play outside…and actually enjoy rainy weekend days which are the perfect time to curl up with a good book, as opposed to all of the reading on the fly I do these days – a chapter here, a chapter there…
    My favorite chapter book as a child was Little Women, which I hated when it was originally suggested to me in third grade but loved when I re-read it two years later. I still sit down to re-read it every now and again, probably about once a year. I’ve also read Little Men and Jo’s Boys, the two sequels, several times. I do love to re-read books…it’s like visiting old friends.
    By the end of this summer, I want to have completed “The Rising Tide” by Jeff Shaara, a historical novel about World War II.

  277. No bookmobile in Long Island in the 60’s, but we had our beloved SRA reading boxes in our classroom; our teacher wisely made reading a reward and we couldn’t wait for math to be done to get to those wonderful boxes. They had colorful cards that kept track of the books you read, and grouped them by *type* for heaven’s sake, so I knew if I were reading nature or fiction or science or history!
    (PS – I went through the bookcycle twice. Had I a rollaway bed I would have been right there with you. Wait, I didn’t mean that to sound dirty.)
    My absolute favorite chapter book growing up was The Saturdays, by Elizabeth Enright – I did not want to leave that world when the book was done, and I almost cried with joy when I learned there was a sequel.
    The book I’m going to read (based on my daughter’s recommendation) is The Expected One by Kathleen McGowan.
    And since I have already pre-ordered my Mason Dixon book, if I win I will donate it to my local library. Thanks for the great memories!

  278. No bookmobile for me, and unfortunately, I think my mom found frequent trips to the library too taxing for her. So I often read and reread the same books over and over to feed my addiction. Some of these are still favorites, but some, on rereading as an adult, are sadly so full of racism or sexism or hateful religious propaganda I don’t feel comfortable reading them to my daughter until she’s old enough to distinguish an author’s opinion from her own. One exception that I recently reread and still love is Caddie Woodlawn by Carol Ryrie Brink. It’s funny and exciting and Caddie is a strong and complex character.
    I just counted the books on my to-read shelf– nineteen! Since I’m about to give birth any minute (due date is tomorrow) I’m not sure I’ll get to many of these any time soon, but I’d guess the next two to be devoured are Of Woman Born by Adrienne Rich and Lost in Austen by Emma Campbell Webster. I have to drop out of that War and Peace group on Ravelry– that’s simply not going to happen!

  279. No bookmobile for me either but I remember my fourth grade teacher reading the Boxcar Children series to us. I loved the Boxcar Children but my all time favorite book was Charlotte’s Web. This summer I will read The Guernsey Literary and Potato Pie Society for our book club. Can’t wait to see your new book!

  280. 1) Bookmobile memories for me were the bookmobile actually coming to my SCHOOL to supplement our small library. I was the summer reading program “over achiever”, the kid that got to put the most stars, stamps or whatevers up on the progress chart they posted. I was the kid everyone hated because I made them look bad I was such a nerd (in my blonde pixie haircut). My most favorite summer reading spot was in the hammock under the weeping willow. It was like having my own private room, and as cool as it got outside in the summer.
    2) “Harriet the Spy” was my absolute favorite book growing up. I was even inspired to try to find interesting things to spy on and keep them in my notebook (Abigail Thomas was not involved).
    3) Planned summer reading, in progress, “Three Cups of Tea” by Greg Mortensen. Totally amazing story and person, putting a clearer picture of the scope of need to the A4A posts. I’m already trying to decide what to knit for this next campaign. Planned fall reading? MDK, Part Deux, of course. (Gratuitous sucking up, but true.)

  281. 1: We didn’t have a bookmobile in our town but I went to the public library every chance I could and I would also borrow books from my beloved aunt. She let me read anything that struck my fancy. I remember vividly once when I was 14 years old and asking for Of Human Bondage and the librarian didn’t think I was old enough to read it. I explained that my high school teacher had it in her classroom and I was reluctantly allowed to sign it out.
    2: I loved so many books when I was a child, but I most clearly remember the Louisa May Alcott books. My children loved it when I read the Borrowers to them.
    3: I’ll be finishing The Pillars of the Earth soon and then I think I’ll reread a beloved Victorian; maybe Dickens’ David Copperfield.
    I can read and knit at the same time, although it’s not the best thing for my neck troubles.

  282. We didn’t have a bookmobile, but the some of the elementary school libraries were open one day a week. So we would go to the closest one to check out books. We also had close public libraries and went there too. My favorite book as a child was Charlotte’s Web. This summer, I am planning to reread the Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. Hopefully, when I have finished re-reading all six of the books to date the next book in the series of the 900+ page books will be out.
    Lynn

  283. We didn’t have a bookmobile, but the some of the elementary school libraries were open one day a week. So we would go to the closest one to check out books. We also had close public libraries and went there too. My favorite book as a child was Charlotte’s Web. This summer, I am planning to reread the Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. Hopefully, when I have finished re-reading all six of the books to date the next book in the series of the 900+ page books will be out.
    Lynn

  284. Bookmobile! Be still my heart! That was a highlight of my summer months as an elementary aged child. I had 4 sibblings and summer was long, lazy, and hot. We walked to our neighborhood public school and enjoyed being in the air conditioned book mobile, checking out new Nancy Drew books. Ah, they made for wonderful evenings reading under the covers with a flashlight, trying to keep my parents from discovering my being up ‘past my bedtime’.
    This summer I have a stack of books on my bedside table. My next read is Sisterchicks Go Brit! by Robin Jones Gunn. If you have not read any of this series you MUST. Talk about girl fun! Travel, girlfriends, good times. . . a great summer read. I requested it online via our library system and had it delivered to my local library – our more ‘modern’ way of getting books these days. Ready to dive in after I finish up one more row of my current WIP.
    Denise of Tulsa, OK

  285. Bookmobile! Be still my heart! That was a highlight of my summer months as an elementary aged child. I had 4 sibblings and summer was long, lazy, and hot. We walked to our neighborhood public school and enjoyed being in the air conditioned book mobile, checking out new Nancy Drew books. Ah, they made for wonderful evenings reading under the covers with a flashlight, trying to keep my parents from discovering my being up ‘past my bedtime’.
    This summer I have a stack of books on my bedside table. My next read is Sisterchicks Go Brit! by Robin Jones Gunn. If you have not read any of this series you MUST. Talk about girl fun! Travel, girlfriends, good times. . . a great summer read. I requested it online via our library system and had it delivered to my local library – our more ‘modern’ way of getting books these days. Ready to dive in after I finish up one more row of my current WIP.
    Denise of Tulsa, OK

  286. 1. The only bookmobile memory I have is of the one that came to my elementary school to sell books each year in the spring. I just loved the smell of the new books, and so many to choose from! I also loved the Scholastic books we used to order through school–my favorite book from Scholastic was a biography of Eugenie Clark. I was a library junkie, too: I learned to write my name at age 5 so I could get a card (and learned to walk to the library by myself, it was a different era); got special permission at age 7 to take out books from the adult section as I had read through the children’s section; and at age 9, had special borrowing privileges in other municipalities.
    2. Not sure what a chapter book is, but I just loved the B is for Betsy series and Betsy, Tacy and Tib. My third grade Language Arts teacher introduced me to James and the Giant Peach and the Animal Family (Randall Jarrell, illustrated by Maurice Sendak).
    3. I plan to read Eclipse by Stephenie Meyer (I read the first book on Sunday night, finished the second one Tuesday night).

  287. ok, I grew up in Malaysia during my formative reading years, so there was no bookmobile. However, the Assunta Convent School provided many books of a wholesome nature entirely unsuited to my proclivities and personal profile. I was a tubby large blonde girl addicted to all the british novels of tiny ballerinas who made good at Covent Garden and the Royal ballet….not for me. However I thoroughly enjoyed all the Enid Blyton mystery series and schoolgirl series (highly contributive to the early Harry Potter books!). However, what really stuck was reading as escape to another world – you can really be anyone you want to be….
    This year…Girls of Riyadh as recommended by my mom – a banned bestseller in its original Arabian – the story of women growing up in the upper echelon of Saudi society.
    Nice contest and theme – and I already have you pre-ordered on Amazon, but would love to pass a copy on to friends!

  288. 1. The only bookmobile memory I have is of the one that came to my elementary school to sell books each year in the spring. I just loved the smell of the new books, and so many to choose from! I also loved the Scholastic books we used to order through school–my favorite book from Scholastic was a biography of Eugenie Clark. I was a library junkie, too: I learned to write my name at age 5 so I could get a card (and learned to walk to the library by myself, it was a different era); got special permission at age 7 to take out books from the adult section as I had read through the children’s section; and at age 9, had special borrowing privileges in other municipalities.
    2. Not sure what a chapter book is, but I just loved the B is for Betsy series and Betsy, Tacy and Tib. My third grade Language Arts teacher introduced me to James and the Giant Peach and the Animal Family (Randall Jarrell, illustrated by Maurice Sendak).
    3. I plan to read Eclipse by Stephenie Meyer (I read the first book on Sunday night, finished the second one Tuesday night).

  289. ok, I grew up in Malaysia during my formative reading years, so there was no bookmobile. However, the Assunta Convent School provided many books of a wholesome nature entirely unsuited to my proclivities and personal profile. I was a tubby large blonde girl addicted to all the british novels of tiny ballerinas who made good at Covent Garden and the Royal ballet….not for me. However I thoroughly enjoyed all the Enid Blyton mystery series and schoolgirl series (highly contributive to the early Harry Potter books!). However, what really stuck was reading as escape to another world – you can really be anyone you want to be….
    This year…Girls of Riyadh as recommended by my mom – a banned bestseller in its original Arabian – the story of women growing up in the upper echelon of Saudi society.
    Nice contest and theme – and I already have you pre-ordered on Amazon, but would love to pass a copy on to friends!

  290. ok, I grew up in Malaysia during my formative reading years, so there was no bookmobile. However, the Assunta Convent School provided many books of a wholesome nature entirely unsuited to my proclivities and personal profile. I was a tubby large blonde girl addicted to all the british novels of tiny ballerinas who made good at Covent Garden and the Royal ballet….not for me. However I thoroughly enjoyed all the Enid Blyton mystery series and schoolgirl series (highly contributive to the early Harry Potter books!). However, what really stuck was reading as escape to another world – you can really be anyone you want to be….
    This year…Girls of Riyadh as recommended by my mom – a banned bestseller in its original Arabian – the story of women growing up in the upper echelon of Saudi society.
    Nice contest and theme – and I already have you pre-ordered on Amazon, but would love to pass a copy on to friends!

  291. No bookmobile for me. But I practically lived at the local library growing up. For six months in middle school as my parents’ marriage was falling apart, I lived with my mother in a neighboring town. Nearly every day in the summer I would tromp to the local library, stock up on books, read most of the evening and following day, until it was time to return the next day to return the finished books and get a new stash. Fast-forward to college. While out one weekend, I ran into a casual friend from class when her mother next to her asked if I remembered her. I’d never previously known we’d met, but it turned out she was the librarian and still remembered me almost ten years later.
    Anyway, one of my favorite books from childhood was Little Women, although there was also Girl of the Limberlost and so many others — I still love my classics. And before the end of summer, I hope to finish Leif Enger’s new book, So Brave, Young and Handsome and finally read Life of Pi.

  292. Ah bookmobiles! Growing up in a small farming town in middle New Jersey we had a town library and the main branch of the county library all within walking distance of our small bungalow. We lived in the last house in the borough, just 100 feet away from bookmobile eligibility! My most memorable book as a child of 11 was Margaret Truman’s autobiography, “Souvenier.” My mother had to check it out for me because I was restricted to childrens books by the librarian. Now, as a librarian I am happy to see the profession not restricting children who want challenges. This summer I plan to finish “How to read a novel like a professor.”

  293. I was lucky enough to live “in town” and so could ride my bike *directly to the library*! And I did, nearly every day in the summer. Our library a variety of contests in the children’s department, and by far my favorite was the “find the hidden book” contest. Each day, a book was chosen, and if you found it hidden among the stacks (because, naturally, to be hidden, it was not where it belonged alphabetically or dewey decimally) then you won… something? A chance in a drawing? I have no idea! But I remember the thrill of the hunt, trying to find the book on the shelf!
    My very favorite, and most ridiculously sad, book as a kid was Bridge to Terabithia. Oh, I CRIED!
    This summer I hope to read Illegal Action by Stella Rimington – a summer read, to be sure!

  294. 1. Living in a small town in Michigan we didn’t have a bookmobile, but my siblings and I grew up loving to read and used the Public Library frequently.
    2. My favorite series of books growing up were the “Shoe” books by Noel Streatfeild (“Ballet Shoes”, “Circus Shoes”, “Dancing Shoes”, “Skating Shoes”). They all sat on the library shelves with beautiful covers and they would whisk me away to a different time and place.
    3. I just finished “The Tenth Gift” by Jane Johnson and am ready to start “Netherland” by Joseph O’Neill (both from our local library).

  295. No bookmobile for me, but i do have tons of memories of our weekly trips to the library, where i would get stacks of babysitters club and choose-your-own-adventure books and tear through them.
    I loved the little house in the big woods when i was small
    i plan to finish mississippi sissy by the end of the week…

  296. No bookmobile for me, but i do have tons of memories of our weekly trips to the library, where i would get stacks of babysitters club and choose-your-own-adventure books and tear through them.
    I loved the little house in the big woods when i was small
    i plan to finish mississippi sissy by the end of the week…

  297. I was too young for the bookmobiles, but I love reading! I was reading dictionaries at 3. LOL My favorite fiction book is …. Well, honestly that’s pretty hard. I’d have to say my *real* favorite is the bible. I love reading my bible. And a book I plan to read by the end of this summer is book 4, proably all of them really, of The Dairies of Corrie Belle Holister.
    (If for some odd reason I’m actaully chosen (first time in my life I’d have ever won anything!LOL) you can contact me at the website I put above. :)

  298. Unfortunately, I am too young to have been blessed with the Bookmobile. Now that I know such a thing existed, I am heartbroken! I did have the Scholastic Book order, though. My mom would put limits on how many books I could buy, and I would pore over that two page catalog and AGONIZE over which books I could sacrifice from my list. I learned to read at the age of four. Like, really read. The teachers thought I had just memorized stories, but I was reading. I feel as if a piece of me is missing if I don’t have a book. As my husband (and Johnny 5) likes to say, “I need input!”
    I loved the Little House Books. I read and re-read them until their covers fell off, and then I kept on reading. I always wondered what it would be like to live without electricity, or be snowed in and starving, or be a teacher when some of your students were older than you. Laura was always so strong (and strong-willed)!
    This summer I plan to read Sail, by James Patterson and Howard Roughan, The Good Guy, by Dean Koontz, and Flowers for Algernon, by Daniel Keyes. And I’ll probably read my Little House Books again – you know, for fun!
    LOVE your first book, and would be THRILLED to win a copy of the second!

  299. Man, I wish I had a bookmobile memory. I always thought they were pretty awesome. I was also (and still am) one of the kids who would rather be reading than outside playing. I’m also now a librarian, maybe there’s a connection?

  300. Animal, Vegetable, Miracle
    A bookmobile?! Brilliant!

  301. My favorite childhood chapter book is Charlotte’s Web because it’s the first chapter book I learned to read.
    I plan to read Twilight by the end of the summer, although I also have 2 books in line ahead of it, so we’ll see. ;-)

  302. 1. Our local library had summer reading groups. My mother still has a picture of me receiving a certificate for my participation in a reading group. The picture is taken in the tiny side yard of the library that has since been eliminated with an expansion of the library. I must have been about 8 years old.
    2. Favorite childhood chapter book: The Rabbit’s Umbrella by George Plimpton
    3. To read by the end of the summer “The Book Thief” by Marcus Zusak

  303. We didn’t have a Bookmobile in my town when I was growing up. Every third intersection had a library. I think my favorite chapter book was “Little Women”. I knew that I was Jo, but I desperately wanted to be Beth. It was a sad realization that sometimes you who you are.
    I am going to read “The Omnivore’s Dilemma” before the end of summer, and “Mrs. Emerson’s Wife.”

  304. I was 10 when my idyllic childhood ended. At least, I had thought it was idyllic. When I was 10 I discovered that my dad was not perfect. He drank. He gave away his paycheck money like it was kleenex. He could not be relied upon. My mom had to go to work so we could have food and not lose our home. Again. I had to stay home all that summer and watch my 3 younger siblings. (This was in the day when it was okay to have a 10 year old watch the kids, as long as I knew to go next door if there was a problem.)
    The bookmobile was a gift from God. It came by every week to the corner of my street and I was allowed to leave the sibs with the neighbor for long enough to walk down and get my weekly allotment of books. The librarian inside always had a small stack of books set aside that she knew I would like. Did she see the neediness of this plump bookworm with too much responsibility? The limit was supposed to be 3 books, but she always let me take 12!! She said the extras were for the sibs!
    I always had all the books read by the next week. Heck, I would have had them all read in 3 days if I needed to! Biographies, history, art, mysteries…she opened so much of the world to me! And comfort stories…I still crave Louisa May Alcott whenever life gets too difficult.
    Life is good now. My mom is still my hero. Books are still a gift from God. My husband is reliable. My children are book lovers.
    My favorite chapter book is Eight Cousins, by Louisa May Alcott. I think I need to read it again this summer!

  305. Kay, I think we had different childhoods together. I loved the bookmobile (it was somehow so much more exciting than the library, even though I loved that too). My Schwinn was metallic pink with a sparkly banana seat, a basket with applique flowers and those tassles hanging off the handle bars–I haven’t thought about that in YEARS. My glasses were pink cat-eyes and I had to where a patch sometimes–I’m sure my parents told me I was adorable anyway!
    Our bookmobile gave certificates and different coloured stars if you wrote a report on each of your books–ever the overachiever, I dug in for the stars.
    I loved so many books, but the ones I talk about missing most were The Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankenwiler (not sure how you spell it)and Harold and the Purple Crayon, I loved going to the Met in NY where they had a handout so you could find all of the things mentioned in the mixed up files, it was like a scavenger hunt. Okay, not exactly a bookmobile memory, but it is related.
    As for this summer, I’m currently reading the Book Thief, don’t love it yet, but am one of those who feels they have to finish every book they start, so I’ll slog through, and Miscarriage of Justice, which I heard about on the Word on Words podcast that I learned about from you guys from your first book.
    Surely, that is worth a prize, no?????
    Thanks for the trip down memory lane.

  306. The bookmobile came to our church parking lot, about a 1/2 mile from my home. Mama and I would go and the hateful old librarian/driver would always argue with me about the age appropriateness of the books I checked out. My dear mother, bless her soul, one day told her,
    “She can read any book she wants.” Favorite book? A tie, Wrinkle in Time and Secret Garden, I obviously had a rich fantasy life. To read this summer? That’s all I’ve done this summer. Since my first teacher’s meeting of the new year is next Friday- I’ll probably get in a quick reread of Harry Wong’s The First Days of School.

  307. 1. I remember the bookmobile, but it didn’t come to my neighborhood, I suppose because we didn’t live far enough away. We lived about a mile from the library so we walked. Every Saturday through my young childhood, mom, brother (ooops, I typed bother which is equally accurate) and me. They had a kids program Saturday morning where I sang I’m a Little Teapot, Itsy Bitsy Spider, Old McDonald and the Lady who swallowed a fly song at the top of my lungs. I think they read us a book too, but that was boring. I liked reading, didn’t much care for being read to. OK, so that doesn’t count since it’s not a bona fide bookmobile story.
    2. Five Little Peppers and How they Grew.
    3. The Road from Corrain by Jill K. Conway. Bought it at a library book sale a few weeks ago. Would have read it right away but I was in the middle of the His Dark Materials trilogy. I worked in a bookstore when the book originally came out and was all the rage, but I never read it as my book allowance (including a hefty employee discount) was consumed by fantasy and sci fi.
    4. Congratulations on your upcoming tome! I can’t wait to pore over it. : )

  308. 1. We didn’t have a bookmobile, but I rode my metallic avocado green Schwinn Stingray with the banana seat to the library at least twice a week during the summer to take part in the summer reading program. One summer the librarian brought in the original handwritten manuscript from Laura Ingalls Wilder “Little House on the Prairie” – to see in a glass case, not to read. (see item 2)
    2. I read all the Little House books over and over again as a child, I barely remember anything else except Nancy Drew!
    3. Right now I’m reading my usual stack of mysteries from the library, but waiting for some quiet time is Ken Follett’s “The Pillars of the Earth”
    An additional note, I just took my two kids to the summer reading program at the library – they don’t give certificates anymore – but they have great entertainment – puppet shows, magicians and singing story tellers.

  309. Oh, the bookmobile always seemed so glamorous! But, no, alas, I was content with my little local branch…
    As a child, I loved A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle. it’s still a favorite, along with the rest of her books.
    This summer I’m going to read those Twilight books to see what my students are so excited about. (had a boy reading one under the table in 5th period this year; must be good.)
    Can’t wait for YOUR new book!!!
    Dana in Bellingham, Wash.

  310. One year when I was home from school, sick with toncilitis (sp?), the good old bookmobile saved the day. My Mom checked out several books, my favorite of which was Maple Sugar for Wendyfoot. It was one of my all time favorite books, because I love snow and horses.
    I have several books started (!), but I do plan to read Walt Disney’s biography and finish 1776. Uh, and Ann & Kaye’s new prize…

  311. Our Bookmobile stopped on a street corner on the road behind ours. I went through the next door neighbor’s yard, through the yard behind their’s, then up the street to the Bookmobile. I read all sorts of books, biographies, children’s fiction, I was even into SciFi back then – such as they had in Bookmobile’s aimed mostly at children.
    My favorite books was a series about a little girl named Betsy. I read all the books the school library had about Betsy and enjoyed her adventures, including the arrival of her baby sister.
    Before the end of the year I plan to read Mason-Dixon Knitting Outside the Lines : Patterns, Stories, Pictures, True Confessions, Tricky Bits, Whole New Worlds, and Familiar Ones, Too. It would be lovely to read it for free!
    Knit on.

  312. 1. no bookmobile in my town, but the library had a branch that was in walking distance, so that was all okay.
    2. Anne of Green Gables! I liked Laura Ingalls but for me she paled in comparison to all the spunk and imagination that Anne had.
    3. David Sedaris’ latest: “”When You Are Engulfed in Flames”

  313. I had one of those Sting-Rays with the sparkly seats, too. Wasn’t it great? The seat was long enough so that you could have a passenger behind you. Fun.
    One of my first jobs was as a page at our public library in Garden Grove, California. I shelved all the biographies and 900’s, and I loved my time spent in the stacks putting away returned books. All hail the Dewey Decimal system! One of the perks was the occasional assignment to shelve books at the bookmobile. It was a lot smaller, of course, and I got the books put away super fast!
    Nancy Drew was my favorite chapter book.
    My summer book will be “Blue Eggs and Yellow Tomatoes”, a cookbook a friend just wrote…

  314. I had one of those Sting-Rays with the sparkly seats, too. Wasn’t it great? The seat was long enough so that you could have a passenger behind you. Fun.
    One of my first jobs was as a page at our public library in Garden Grove, California. I shelved all the biographies and 900’s, and I loved my time spent in the stacks putting away returned books. All hail the Dewey Decimal system! One of the perks was the occasional assignment to shelve books at the bookmobile. It was a lot smaller, of course, and I got the books put away super fast!
    Nancy Drew was my favorite chapter book.
    My summer book will be “Blue Eggs and Yellow Tomatoes”, a cookbook a friend just wrote…

  315. I LOVED the bookmobile! I have a dimple that is said to have been caused by falling off the bookmobile when I was 4, tho’ I don’t remember in detail. Caddie Woodlawn was one of my favorite chapter books — and this summer I am hoping to read Eat Pray Love. Thanks for jogging lovely memories!!

  316. 1. Very fuzzy memories of the bookmobile in my neighborhood near the end of the school year. But then we were off to Cape Cod for the summer, and they didn’t have bookmobiles there. But they had a great local branch of the public library, and my mother would pull us off the beach and take us there once a week. Probably the only time I put shoes on all week… We loved going. It was an old brick building that was always cool and dark. Such a contrast from the beach! We read every book in that library. And they still (35 years later) have our paper library cards on file!
    2. Anything by Laura Ingalls Wilder. I loved her. I wanted to be her.
    3. For my book group this month: The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak.

  317. 1. Very fuzzy memories of the bookmobile in my neighborhood near the end of the school year. But then we were off to Cape Cod for the summer, and they didn’t have bookmobiles there. But they had a great local branch of the public library, and my mother would pull us off the beach and take us there once a week. Probably the only time I put shoes on all week… We loved going. It was an old brick building that was always cool and dark. Such a contrast from the beach! We read every book in that library. And they still (35 years later) have our paper library cards on file!
    2. Anything by Laura Ingalls Wilder. I loved her. I wanted to be her.
    3. For my book group this month: The Book Thief by Marcus

  318. 1. Like many of you, there was no Bookmobile in my little town in Oklahoma. My sister, my momma and I always checked out the maximum number of books each week of summer break too! I do remember finding a steamy (Nearly naked people on the cover!) romance novel in a desk drawer at home. With pillows, I would build my reading nook between my bed and the wall. I kept a “Momma approved” book open and set the romance novel on top. When Momma or Daddy knocked I just slid the steamy romance novel under the bed! It makes me giggle like a 13 year old just thinking about how I loved tricking my Momma. Hum….I think I will go see what my 13 year old daughter is doing…..
    2. The Narnia books are great because my daughter and son are 4 years apart in age. These books kept both of them happy. The first Narnia movie came out right after we finished the first 2 books. We loved it and talked about it for weeks. FYI, the second movie is great too.
    3. I just discovered I can download audio books using my library card for FREE at listennj.com (this is a New Jersey library thing)!!. I’m sure many of you already do this, but this is truly a miracle to me. I’m listening to Jane Austen’s Charlotte. She died before she finished this book and this version was completed by Julia Barrett. Kay, can you hear me in NY laughing with glee as I knit and listen for FREE?! What am I knitting you say? Why, I am knitting Alan Dart’s Nativity Collection. Yup, the whole thing.

  319. Hrm… favorite chapter book? That’s a hard one. I have to go with something by Roald Dalh, such as Matilda or The Witches or The BFG.
    I plan to read Exit Ghost by the end of summer. Along with Stones from The River. And the rest of the stack of books I got from the library today.

  320. Hrm… favorite chapter book? That’s a hard one. I have to go with something by Roald Dalh, such as Matilda or The Witches or The BFG.
    I plan to read Exit Ghost by the end of summer. Along with Stones from The River. And the rest of the stack of books I got from the library today.

  321. Alas and alac, there was no book mobile in desolate northeastern Arkansas, the land of my childhood. However, there was a “liberry” in near by Blytheville and my moma took me there every week. Favorite chapter book of the time? That’s easy. “Cotton in my Sack” by Lois Lenski. Lo and behold it was a book about children growing up in my neck of the woods! Who would ever write a book about us I thought. I now own a vintage copy and keep it displayed somewhere all the time.
    As for a book I plan to read before the summer is over? “Palace Council” Heard about it on NPR the other day and think it just might be my cup of tea.
    Oh yeah, the reference to the bike reminded me that the other day, while my husband and I were prowling around one of our favorite shops, we found a vintage, mint-condition radio flyer trike. In red. Complete with the wind up bell and tassels still intact. 25 bucks. It came home with us. We have three granddaughters who will kill each other to ride it. That should be fun to watch.

  322. I grew up all over Florida and nowhere did I ever encounter a bookmobile. So here go #2 & #3:
    2. I adored Treasure Island when I was a kid and I still do. I read it about every two years (or more often). It just really captures everything that screams “adventure” to me.
    3. I’m currently reading a couple. One is “Going Postal” by Terry Pratchett. If I finish it, my next one of his to start for the first time is “Pyramids” or maybe “Making Money,” seeing as I’ve read all the rest.

  323. No bookmobile – sorry!
    When I was in fourth grade, I had such problems with my eyes that I couldn’t read anything for the entire school year. Nothing – even my school work had to be read to me, and I was just like you with my head buried in a book constantly. My mom took pity on me and would read to me every night. That year, we worked our way through the entire Laura Ingalls Wilder series, and they are still my favorite books of all time.
    This summer, I am reading “Women of the Silk” by Gail Tsukiyama. I also plan to re-read the entire Patrick O’Brian series about Captain Jack Aubrey and Steven Maturin – love them!

  324. 1. Grades 1-4 I went to a little country school which housed only those four grades and had a tiny library, so the bookmobile used to come every other week to the school parking lot during the school year. They’d let us out of class in small groups to go. The really cool thing about the Bookmobile was to check out books they issued us a real library card, good at any library in the county system; the school’s books you just wrote your name and grade on the card in the pocket. It had the little metal plate that had your number on it that went into the machine that somehow got your number on the card in the book. At the time this was very impressive technology, at least for a second grader. I still miss the card in the library book pocket with the due date stamped on it – the little piece of paper that comes from the library’s printer now just isn’t the same. Except when I lost those cards I thought I’d end up in jail with the people who take the tags off their mattress covers. . .
    2. My favorite chapter books were the Little House books. I read and re-read and re-re-read all of them. I own the whole set now, but a few are the scholastic “book order” books from grade school.
    3. I’ve had a beach book summer. Dorothea Benton Frank, Patti Callahan Henry . . . .almost everything I’ve read is set in the South Carolina Lowcountry. But before the summer is over I want to read the Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants books which my daughter swears I will love even though they’re tween books.

  325. Thank you, thank you, thank you! Don’t know why, but it took your post to figure out my library woes. My closest library is several towns away (10 minutes at least by highway) – too much gas just to get books (there are no other errands even close that I could combine a trip with – who ever thought that a trip to the library would be a luxury). However… the bookmobile (yes, we still have one) stops in the grocery store parking lot less than a mile away! I can request any book I want (from any library in the entire state) using their online “card catalog”, and tell them I’ll get it at the bookmobile!! Yippeee!!!! Library books again! You have no idea how happy you’ve made me.
    1. No bookmobile memory (yet).
    2. Any of the Betsy books by Beverly Cleary. Or maybe Anne of Green Gables. Or Little House on the Prarie. (do I have to pick just one??)
    3. The next Pern book (have to look up where I am in the list – they’re by Anne McCaffrey). Then again, I haven’t read the comments yet. I’ll probably find enough great recomendations to keep me reading for the next few years!

  326. 1. Sadly, I have none.
    2. The Ordinary Princess, written and
    illustrated by M.M. Kaye. A princess, fairies, freckles, a plan with a dragon, a forest, a squirrel named Mr. Pemberthy, a crow named Peter Aurelious, castles, picnics and a nice young man named Peregrine–it’s everything you could wish for as a child (and sometimes as an adult :) My copy, somewhat yellowed, dog-eared, and very nearly spine-less from countless readings, is sweetly inscribed “For Emmy, Happy Easter ’89, love, Dad and Mom,” which just makes me love it (and my books-as-gifts-for-any-occasion -buying parents) even more.
    3. “Broken For You,” by Stephanie Kallos, which is purportedly “funny, heartbreaking, and alive with a potpourri of eccentric and irresistible characters…”

  327. 1. Don’t have a Bookmobile memory of my own, but I did have an awesome time volunteering in a project with an afterschool group that had one come by. It was one of the few places the kids felt safe getting books, for various reasons, and it was great to see them get excited.
    2. Emily of New Moon
    3. The Nine, by Jeffrey Toobin

  328. Hello!
    We didn’t have a bookmobile. We got library books through the mail! It was very exciting to get that bag of books.
    I enjoyed the Black Stallion series of books by Walter Farley when I was young. I loved those beautiful horses, and the boy who triumphed over all the mean old men.
    I plan to read The Mermaid Chair by Sue Monk Kidd.

  329. We didn’t have a bookmobile where I grew up, but I loved to visit the local library. My favorite thing there besides the books were the zebra finches that lived in a large cage in the children’s area. (I really enjoyed listening to them chirp!) My favorite books growing up were the Betsy-Tacy-Tib series by Maud Hart Lovelace as well as the very first book in the Boxcar Children series. (I didn’t read any of the other Boxcar books until I had kids of my own.) I’m hoping to read Anne of Green Gables this summer with my daughters.

  330. I only read one comment, the person who says she is too young for a bookmobile. Please note: bookmobiles still make the rounds! All that quaintness can still be had!!
    Bookmobile memory: some where as a young person, I walked through one once, thinking how fortunate I was to have always lived in a place large enough (Chicago at that point) to have libraries. Knew, however, that if I didn’t have a library, I’d be really happy to have a bookmobile.
    Chapter book: wow, lots of them, but I’ll go with “Betsy in Spite of Herself”
    Book I plan to read: Sheer Spirit
    I love books! I love libraries!!
    Gerrie in St Paul

  331. 1. No bookmobiles for me- though I’m sure I would have dug them: books + novelty factor, how could I not? To be honest, I hate libraries much like folks dislike slipping into a pair of over-borrowed bowling shoes (put it on wheels though…). Bookstores are a different story- it can be difficult to extract me, and usually only at great cost.
    2. Like everyone else, I loved Anne of Greene Gables, but my favorite LMM books were the Story Girl ones. Loved the Lion, Witch, & the Wardrobe, Gone with the Wind (6th grade facination), and hit the Maya Angelo pretty hard my freshman year.
    3. I’m currently reading the Brothers Karamazov and hope to finish it before the summer is over. That is if the knitting, quilting, running, and child rearing don’t overly interfere. I noticed that someone listed Three Cups of Tea as their summer reading, and I can not recommend it enough- that followed by a Thousand Splendid Suns is a great pairing. And then, if the reader is not ready to book a flight straight to Afganistan/Pakistan for humanitarian purposes, follow those two novels with the Kite Runner.
    Geez, this is an awfully dry post- no laughing through the tears on this one…Happy Blog-iverary! -Sara

  332. 1. The bookmobile didn’t come all the way out to my house, but I remember taking a rare trip to the library in town when I started asking too many questions about the birds and the bees – my mom put me in the car IMMEDIATELY and after a whispered conversation with the librarian, I went home with a small stack of books from the 612 section of the dewey decimal system.
    2. I was a geek. We had the Childcraft set of children’s encyclopedias, and I remember every summer waiting for the annual to see what it was about. I remember one year (1977, I was 7) the annual was about dogs. It included Hans Christian Anderson’s ‘The Tinderbox,’ with dogs whose eyes were the size of saucers, and bigger. I read of Balto for the first time, and I cried several times over the story of the faithful hound (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gelert). That annual, and the ‘Mathemagic’ annual the next year would probably have to be my favorites.
    3. Twilight. It seems like everyone I know under 30 has read this, and I’m tired of not knowing what they’re all talking about.

  333. How I would have loved a bookmobile. It sounds so much more romantic than the corner library. But that’s what I had. My favourite story? Checking out The Postman Always Rings Twice when I was 10. The librarian only let me have it after I promised it was for my mom. My mom laughed when she saw it. I guess she figured I wouldn’t understand it. (She was right… it was years before I understood why the librarian didn’t want to let me have it!!!)
    Ditto for chap books. Didn’t even know they existed until I started volunteering at our local authors festival. But I think I’ll hunt down Little House in the Big Woods. I feel I missed out on something good.
    Summer reading is all lined up — with room for a few surprises. I’m rereading Elizabeth George’s Inspector Lynley series. I’ve got To Kill a Mockingbird on my bedside table. I think I’ve always thought I’d read it, but never did. In anticipation of a trip to Russia I’m taking next year, I’ve got a book of Tolstoy’s short stories lined up,and I’ve started on the Death of Ivan Ilych… pretty good so far. Lastly, I’m catching up on foodie reading: The 100 Mile Diet and The Omnivore’s Dilemna. Oh, and as soon as it’s out, M’Lou Baber’s double-knitting book!

  334. Sadly, I am too young for the Bookmobile…although I have heard my dad talk about it. But gosh! A favorite book from my childhood! “Understood Betsy” by Dorothy Canfield Fisher. I plan to read “Mansfield Park” by Jane Austen by the end of Summer 2008.
    (“Betsy in spite of herself is really good, although I liked “Heaven to Betsy” better. But Maud Hart Lovelace stuff is good. Period).

  335. I LOVED bookmobile days! My gradeschool had a big circular drive with a grassy circle where the flagpole was. Twice a month the bookmobile ladies would drive up in the beige and brown St. Louis bookmobile,and they would pull it all the way around the circle to park right in front of the first grade windows. It was a truck/trailer rig. There were 2 doors on the bookmobile and we had to enter through the front, select our books (limit of 6)then skinny our way to the check out desk which was a small wooden thing near the back and exit the back door. God help you if you tried to exit the front door,we never saw those kids again. The bookmobile ladies always wore skirts and twinsets. I remember the speckled linoleum floor that was also beige and brown. It made a crackle sound in spots when you walked on it. It was a bookmobile day when I discovered all the Laura Ingalls Wilder books starting with “Little House in the Big Woods.” This summer (between job, garden, knitting and family) I’ve read “Eat,Love,Pray” and “Three Cups of Tea”.
    I’ve started “Mansfield Park”.

  336. I would have to say my favorite childhood books were the Ramona books by Beverly Cleary. I have no idea what I’m going to read before the end of the summer, but if I’m going to read anything, I’d better get cracking…school starts back in a couple of weeks!

  337. When I was in college I did an internship at a small weekly newspaper in Groton, South Dakota. I believe it had a library and there was a library in the state’s third largest city, located a mere half-hour drive away. However, the Brown County bookmobile still visited Groton on a regular basis. It was located in a modern version of the bus in these pictures. Its arrival was a much-anticipated event for me at least. I was three hours from home, knew virtually no one and lived in an apartment that for several weeks consisted of one director’s chair, a lounge lawn chair that I used as a bed, my TV and several plastic crates. The bookmobile was definitely a bright spot.
    Favorite Chapter Book: Eight Cousins by Louisa May Alcott.
    Before the end of the summer I plan to read East of Eden by John Steinbeck.

  338. “I rode my bike (a metallic blue Schwinn Sting-Ray with sparkly banana seat–thankyouUncleJohn FOREVER) to the Bookmobile every week. I took a shortcut on a dirt road. And if you think this scene can’t get any more wholesome and all-American, please know that at this time, I wore seersucker short sets with matching sleeveless tops. Appliqued fruit was standard. My haircut was known as the Pixie, my eyeglasses were always askew if not taped, and I had a tendency to breathe through my mouth. (In other words, I was adorable.)”
    #1 After reading this it is obvious we are twins seperated at birth.
    #2 My Sting-Ray was green. After hanging in my Grandparents garage for 30+ years it has been fixed up by my young cousin. It is fablulous and I know where it is!
    #3 A Bookmobile visited my school. Which now seems funny becasue the library was just a few blocks south of the school. Didn’t matter, I checked out stacks of books from the local library, the Bookmobile AND the school libray. Whatever limit each of these places set was not nearly enough.
    #4 Favorite childhood book…Secret Garden, no contest. I still have the same battered, er, well-loved copy of my childhood. The pages fall out in clumps but I would never think to replace it.
    #5 Book of the summer. Master and Commander. I have procured all of the nautical dictionaries, rigging charts and geograhical maps needed to read the darn thing. Wish me luck.

  339. We lived in a very rural area and didn’t have a bookmobile. But we would send for a box of assorted books from the state library. It was great when the box arrived, and we got to open it to see the treasures inside. They would send an assortment for your age group. I would want to just read and read until I finished every book in the box.
    I loved all types of fiction. I remember loving Little Women, Tom Sawyer, The Last of the Mochiacans, etc.
    Actually I am planning a trip to our local bookstore tomorrow to find new books to read on our upcoming vacation…so enjoying reading these comments for ideas.

  340. First off, Happy Blogiversary! I’ve been reading you and Ann for about 18 months and LOVE your book and can hardly wait for your new one. You two do fabulous work together!
    1) No bookmobile in Bellevue. But, a nice little library. During the summer, my mom dropped me off at the library while she went to the beauty shop every week. I would load up on my six book limit. To this day, I love the smell of a library.
    2) I was such a bookworm, I’m not sure what I would consider my favorite. I read all the Little House books several times. I read all the Nancy Drew books I could find. I loved Louisa May Alcott. Any book that took me away to some place magical…but not scarey….
    3) I’m still a bookworm. I have three Debbie Macomber books that I am currently working my way through–A Shop On Blossom Street. Next is “A Good Yarn”…then “Back on Blossom Street.” If I’m not knitting–I’m reading about knitting!!

  341. 1 my bookmobile stgry. I remember them coming when I was a kid but this story is from when I was 28 or so. I was visiting my sister in her mobile home trailer court in (not kidding) the dismal swamp of north carolina and pretty bored when what came by but the bookmobile. I chose the Secret Garden and I loved that book. Very good memory. 2 I was 12 and came by some real money caont remember how now, but I bought Little Women at the local Tradewell Store, doesnt exist anymore either. Another great book. Have to mention a move to CA on Mothers day weekend in ’74 when I was also 12. Only 3 weeks of school to go and so lonely and bored I went to the Library where the librarian gave me Farley Mowat’s the boat who wouldnt float and the chronicals of narnia.. Bless her 3 Will finish A voyage long and Strange by Tony Horwitz this summer.

  342. Oh! Thank goodness my girlfriend Georgie steered me to Mason Dixon tonight! After a difficult hot, grown up day, the “summer bookmobile” on the blog really brought me back to the lotusland that was summer as a carefree kid.
    My mother was a librarian and my father treated his book collection like precious objects so books were a real character in my childhood. But summer and books; Weren’t those long leisurely summer afternoons immersed in another world just without equal?
    I remember loving Nancy Drew until I discovered Trixie Belden who seemed not so perfect as Nancy Drew. Somehow I knew Nancy would not want to hang with me.
    Then I discovered G.K. Chesterton and the Penrod series one summer.
    But the summer of 1967 and T.H. Whites’s telling of the Arthurian legend in “The Once and Future King” was the book that signalled the end of my childhood. I was 12 years old and spending every moment of light swimming and I had a major crush on the lifeguard who had just finished his freshman year at Brown University. He was reading that while on lifeguard duty and so I decided I must read the very sentences he was reading as a way to merge my soul with his.
    My reading lost some innocence that summer

  343. Wow, a contest and a whole lot of amazing book memories and suggestions for future reads! I am up too late so I will keep it to the contest rules:
    1) The Five Children and It, by E. Nesbit, about five sibs living in the English countryside during wartime, and their adventures with the Psammead, a water-phobic creature who grants daily wishes.
    2) And another “children’s” book, thanks to the New Yorker article on E.B. White’s classic, this summer I plan to read (I don’t think it’ll be a re-read) “Stuart Little.” Love that E.B. and his talented wife Katharine (check out her correspondence with another devoted gardener and garden writer, Elizabeth Lawrence, in “Two Gardeners.”
    Oh And Happy, so happy, as-happy-as-you-make-all-of us-with-your-offerings-of-knit-and-wit Blogiversary!!!

  344. 1. My mom is a librarian. When I was in high school, she went to summer school and got her Master’s in Library Science at the U of A in Tucson, AZ, and promptly got hired in Yuma (where we lived and she and Dad live). She drove the bookmobile, a tremendous white German hulk made by Gerstenslager.
    She and her co-hort made the rounds to the outlying areas (Roll, Tacna, and Wellton) and to the Yuma parks on summer nights. The Gerstenslager’s pale flanks played double duty as movie screens on those dusty, 115-degree evenings.
    I was old enought to try not to be jealous of all the kids Mom knew by name; I knew she had a special place in their hearts as the Bookmobile Lady. She always made a good matchmaker with books and kids.
    The Gerstenslager weighed about 15,000 lbs; Mom is 5′ and probably 110 wringing wet. It always made me smile to see her hop out and set up for her booklovers; like a little elf daintily leaping from an enormous sequoia. She drove it like a pro, too.
    2. Favorites from girlhood (and still re-reading today): any and all Beverly Cleary titles (especially with Ramona), The Phantom Tollbooth, and all of Marguerite Henry’s horse books, but especially “Born To Trot”.
    3. This summer; trying out some classics. Just read and enjoyed “Around The World In Eighty Days’, so “Journey To The Center of The Earth” will likely follow, perhaps “Les Miserables” as well. Also finally getting round to books 2 & beyond of Harry Potter, so adding modern classics, as well!

  345. 1. The incongruity of the bendy Bibliobus parked outside the Town Hall in Epernay (Champagne?).
    2. Fairy Tales by Grimm which my Dad won as first prize at sunday school Christmas 1913. I read it a lot and I’m ashamed to admit that it bears the scars.
    3.I plan to read ‘Much Depends on Dinner’ by Margaret Visser.

  346. We had a bookmobile, but it came rarely, and our local library was better stocked, so I hardly used it. Just like you, I read voraciously as a child, and was famed in the family for all the contorted positions I would get into while reading on the couch. One of my favourites (besides the Little House in the Big Woods, mentioned several times already) was “Five run away together” by Enid Blyton, a hand-me-down from my father. This summer, I have two books packed in my bags for our holiday. They are “The Golden Notebook” by Doris Lessing (I’ve read too little by her, and want to celebrate one of very few female Nobel Prize winners!) and “Special Topics in Calamity Physics” by Marisha Pessl for some lighter relief.

  347. 1. As a city kid, I never had a bookmobile but instead went to the library four blocks from my house — mind you I would never walk there because there was no way I could carry all those books.
    2. The first chapter book I ever read was My Father’s Dragon — the family copy of it is still much treasured.
    3. The summer I discovered Agatha Christie’s shelf at the library was magical and I would really like to reread And Then There Were None before summer is out.

  348. I don’t remember a bookmobile in my childhood, but we did visit the library regularly and on birthdays more or less my favourite present was a book token that would get five or six books. I loved that book pile next to the bed and still do today.
    One of my favourite books from the pile was ‘A Little Princess’ because who wouldn’t like a book about a nice girl ending up a servant in an attic and then making friends with the monkey from next door.
    Maybe I ought to read that again this summer…
    I plan to read ‘The Forgotten Garden’ by Kate Morton this summer. It’s good and thick and will take a nice long time.

  349. My childhood memories are of the local library, I was delighted when I could borrow 6 books at a time and they were usually finished within the week! The only mobile library in my life was when I was 30, but I used it for the period I lived on its route.
    My favourite book as a child was What Katy Did by S Coolidge. If I had come across Anne of Green Gables at that age, I would have loved it too.
    Many books on my reading list this summer, I still read a lot. Mostly crimis by Ian Rankine and Linda Fairstein and that ilk.
    Happy Blogaversary!

  350. Hi, We had the mobile library here in England in the late ’60s early ’70s, that came to the end of the road once a week, I went every week and read all I could borrow. As a special treat we occasionally were allowed to buy a book but as I could read half of it on the way home on the bus that didn’t happen very often. Favourites were very varied, Enid Blyton, Mallory Towers series, Chalet Girls series, St Clares, all the classic childrens books like Heidi, What katy Did, Dr. Dolittle, Milly Molly Mandy, Little Women, Stig of the dump, Ann of green Gables, Narnia series, Follyfoot farm. If I got given a book for birthday or Christmas I read till I finished it. I still love reading today, currently reading several books as I am off sick from work, Jodi Picoult, Sue Grafton, borrowed from the library, not mobile these days, and re- reading my Terry Pratchett collection. Thank you for prompting my memory, I am going to start a collection for my little granddaughter! Many thanks for your highly entertaining blog and book. Sue.

  351. Alas, no bookmobile memories (i am from Canada- and northern Quebec at that!)(heck- I don’t think people were even able to READ up there!) Buut memorable- here goes- my favourite book as a preteen/early teen was “Rilla of Ingleside” by LM Montgomery (Rilla was Anne of Green Gables’ daughter). I read it and re-read it. So, on my 16th birthday- Dad got me an original copy of it, with a painted cover. Sigh. I don’t know where he found it, but I love it and keep on my shelf at work (I teach Grade 7). And which books am I going to read- wow- lots and lots-how about “Where Are You Now?” by Mary Higgins Clark? Or I have “The Knitting Circle” I would like to re-read. Hmmmm. Or…well, lots on the shelf,and the summer is only halfway! Cheers!

  352. In Sioux Falls, SD when I’d visit my cousin, at Bancroft school, they had a Bookmobile. I was so jealous, just imagine–books that came to you on a summers day!It was just one more reason in my arsenal to convince my parents of the need to move there from Minneapolis. The librarian even had special book selection for kids. As an adult, I would sometimes wonder why those books never fell off the shelves if the librarian took a wild turn. Were there straps that held them in place?
    Bancroft school was this gorgeous Spanish Style white stucco building. It of course had to be torn down because the renovations would have been more than to just build a new school on the site.
    I chose to read Misty and Stormy by Margurite Henry. I also went on to read every book she ever wrote, because she wrote about horses. I wrote her a letter, and she replied to me, by hand. No email back in book mobile days, no sir. I got a post card, which I treasure to this day.

  353. In Sioux Falls, SD when I’d visit my cousin, at Bancroft school, they had a Bookmobile. I was so jealous, just imagine–books that came to you on a summers day!It was just one more reason in my arsenal to convince my parents of the need to move there from Minneapolis. The librarian even had special book selection for kids. As an adult, I would sometimes wonder why those books never fell off the shelves if the librarian took a wild turn. Were there straps that held them in place?
    Bancroft school was this gorgeous Spanish Style white stucco building. It of course had to be torn down because the renovations would have been more than to just build a new school on the site.
    I chose to read Misty and Stormy by Margurite Henry. I also went on to read every book she ever wrote, because she wrote about horses. I wrote her a letter, and she replied to me, by hand. No email back in book mobile days, no sir. I got a post card, which I treasure to this day.

  354. We didn’t have a bookmobile where I grew up :(
    But I alwayss loved books and the library. As a child I loved Charlotte’s Web. My aunt used to come over Friday nights after working at the A&P and play games and read to me every week. Charlotte’s Web was the book I remember loving the most. It was also the first chapter book I read to my own daughter and she loved it. We got the video after finishing the book and that’s what she was watching with my mother in law while I was at the hospital delivering my son. When we called to tell her that she had a brother she wanted to know if it was ok to finish the movie before she came to see him.
    By the end of the summer I’m hoping to read The Friday Night Knitting Club.

  355. Sadly no bookmobile memories for me—thank goodness for the public library. It’s long torn down but I can still picture the inside and all the stacks, where I spent hours which became years of my childhood.
    Even sitting her at age 45 I am drooling in envy of your green Schwinn as I rode a spray-painted metallic silver second hand bike. I finally convinced my parents to spring for the banana seat but not the rack that held it in back so we tied it down in front with electrical wire. Memories……
    My favorite childhood books were 3 girl detective books I got at a garage sale. NOT Nancy Drew and sadly I can’t remember the titles–only that she had short curly hair and her sidekick’s name was Honey. Currently I enjoy reading the Magic Tree House series with my 7 year old.
    Have to tell you that my strongest memories of our roll away bed is being folded up in it by my older brothers who would fasten the latch and then leave me to find my way out. Screaming “MOM!” the top of my lungs was usually the only way out. Someday I plan to write a book of my own–“How I Survived Four Older Brothers.”
    Thanks for the trip down memory lane!!

  356. We didn’t have a bookmobile where I grew up :(
    But I alwayss loved books and the library. As a child I loved Charlotte’s Web. My aunt used to come over Friday nights after working at the A&P and play games and read to me every week. Charlotte’s Web was the book I remember loving the most. It was also the first chapter book I read to my own daughter and she loved it. We got the video after finishing the book and that’s what she was watching with my mother in law while I was at the hospital delivering my son. When we called to tell her that she had a brother she wanted to know if it was ok to finish the movie before she came to see him.
    By the end of the summer I’m hoping to read The Friday Night Knitting Club.

  357. Okay, I hit POST and it came to me. The series of Non-Nancy Drew girl detective books I read was TRIXIE BELDEN. Just had to post because it was making me crazy that I couldn’t remember. :-)

  358. i don’t think there was a book mobile in our out in the mud neighbor hood in Anchorage in the 60’s. But I did have a rocking bike and I do believe there were daisies on my banana seat. and a sissy bar. I read lots and lots as a kid and can’t remember much title-wise… although I recently bought “Black Hearts in Battersea” because I remember reading it as a child.. buying it, in fact with a silver dollar that my dad had given me….I also remember my 6th grade teacher reading aloud to us from “THe great brain” and I bought that too, for me kids to read, although they read Japanese books and not english books…..
    right now I am reading KIRA KIRA, a kids book, but a nice story… my husband bought it to read…
    I will be in the states from July 31 to Aug. 21.. that will be my last chance to get your book.. unless I pay inflated prices on Amazon Japan…oh well, I will because it’ll be worth it.
    hey, come on over to my blog for your chance to win a kimono!!!!!

  359. The bookmobile was the greatest thing. The contest in my town was between all the girls racing to be the first in line, because as the line got shorter the good books were few and far between. One morning while riding by tourquise colored bike with the regular seat, however the plastic tassles hanging from the handle bars, and the matching plastic basket on the front, I was in a panic, that I would be late getting to the bookmobile, so while riding feverishly down the street, I briefly turned around to check on my sister, I ran straight into the back of a car. I was not injured, however the beautiful bike did not fair as well. I made it to the bookmobile, half carrying by broken bike,because the fork had been bent, thus the front wheel would not rotate. I piled my books in the plastic basket, then proceeded to take my stash home. The punishment I recieved was not so harsh. No repairs to the bike, no new bike, so I was trapped into READING at home. Oh was a shame. I did feel the pain every week, when I had to walk to the bookmobile. I loved to read Cherry Ames books. My favorite being Cherry Ames, Dude Ranch Nurse. Currently I am reading The Shack. Very different for the types of books I normally read. Have a great rest of your summer, and can’t wait for your new book to be released.

  360. favorite books: Cherry Ames (nurse) series
    read this summer: Opinionated Knitter

  361. favorite books: Cherry Ames (nurse) series
    read this summer: Opinionated Knitter

  362. favorite books: Cherry Ames (nurse) series
    read this summer: Opinionated Knitter

  363. The book mobile didn’t come out our way but the favorite thing was to beg for the trip into town to check out the maximum number of books allowed each week and read them all.
    One of my all time favorite books was The Secret Garden, still enjoy watching the movie when I can.
    Looking forward to reading Amagansett by Mark Mills this summer!

  364. First I have to say that I’ve never quite gotten over not having a banana seat on my bike–thanks for reminding me!
    My friend Michelle had one–with those tall handle bars with streamers, too–but we didn’t ride our bikes to the bookmobile, we walked. It came to our apartment complex and parked near her home. It must have been small inside, because my memory of it is that it was small inside, and you know how childhood memories make everything seem bigger. Well, I remember getting armloads of books when the bookmobile came. It was probably only 4 or 5, but it felt like my ship had come in. My career as a confirmed book sniffer started about this time. Those books smelled wonderful, not at all like my mother’s paperback Judith Krantz novels.
    One of my favorite books was “From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler”. To this day I want to run away and spend the night in a museum–just not the one from the Ben Stiller movie. The kids and I recently re-read this gem. And am I ever glad they like it–I have yet to interest my dd in horse books, and Walter Farley was one of my favorite authors as a kid–makes me feel like I’ve somehow failed as a parent! A girl not liking horse books???
    I’m reading “American-Made: The Enduring Legacy of the WPA: When FDR Put the Nation to Work”. It’s big, it’s long and its title is a mouthful. Not the best beach reading, but it’s fascinating and it’s making me whine less about the price of gas because, it could be worse! And since summer here in SC lasts a LONG time, I should be finished by the end of summer:)

  365. 1. My favorite bookmobile memory – I was nine years old and attempted to check out The Count of Monte Cristo and the librarian would not let me, until I brought my mom to the bookmobile to tell her that yes, I did read books like that. Once a nerd, always a nerd.
    2. Pat of Silver Bush, by Lucy Maud Montgomery – I found my mother’s childhood copy of this at my grandmother’s house and cried my way through it many times.
    3. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer

  366. Oh, my memory is so impoverished and lame these days! I don’t have any specific bookmobile memories left, just a feeling: a nebulous, fluffy, warm feeling of LUUUUUV. I completely LOVED the bookmobile!
    There are two childhood things I wish to urge upon you: Ruth M. Arthur, author of many spooky chapter books for girls all brilliantly illustrated by Margery Gill. My absolute favorite was A Candle in Her Room, about an evil doll called Dido that was passed down in secret for generations in a family of Englishwomen. Chills galore! Ruth Arthur is not much read these days, which I think is a pity. Do try her :)
    The other, *so* very fondly remembered, is a book, also English, called Donkeys for Rogador by Ruth Borchard. A beautiful wish-fulfillment fantasy about a family that inherits a place in the country. That comes with donkeys.
    And this summer, finally: Three Men in a Boat, by Jerome K. Jerome. Just got it for my birthday.
    And in September: New MDK! HOW impatiently I await it!

  367. No bookmobile for us. But Mom used to drop us off at the library and we never knew when/if she was coming back.
    Favorite book was Anne of Green Gables
    Currrently reading An Equal Music by Vikram Seth–It also has a CD so you can listen to the music from the novel. It’s very cool

  368. 1. A Bookmobile memory if you have one.
    My summer was devoted to working for the Iona Community on the Isle of Iona in Scotland. The Isle of Iona is so small that they have one visit from the bookvan a month, and I happened to track down when it was coming. A whole whack of American vollies (volunteers from the US and Canada) tripped down to meet the bookvan coming off the ferry, then we proceeded to try and check out books, only to find that we cannot because we don’t live in the UK. Bummer. But there is still a bookvan making the rounds of rural Scotland.
    2. The title of a favorite chapter book from your childhood or your child’s childhood.
    One of my everlasting favorites was (still is) the Phantom Tollbooth.
    3. The title of a book you plan to read before the end of the summer of 2008.
    I’m about to finish The Once and Future King, only to launch into Grant Speaks. Can’t think of a better thing to read while cruising around Scotland, eh?

  369. I loved this post and reading all the responses –bringing back lots of memories. I remember going to the bookmobile growing up in Kansas. I don’t have a clue what the outside looked like but I remember the inside looking like the picture you have posted. And, yes, the seersucker shorts sets! Many of these were made by my mom and my grandma. Later, we would see scrap quilts out of the same fabric. The clothes are long gone but the quilts are still here and we have fun remembering the clothes we wore when we bring them out.
    My favorite books include many of those already listed — Laura Ingalls Wilder, Louis May Alcott. However, I think some of my favorites were by Osa and Martin Johnson. There was a museum of their adventures that made a great school field trip. I loved reading about their safaris and exploring adventures.
    Before the end of the summer, I plan on reading Janet Evanovich’s Lean Mean Thirteen. I can count on laughing out loud as I read any book in this series. And then, I can share with my daughters. Even better.

  370. We didn’t have a bookmobile. As for books I loved as kid–the Laura Ingalls Wilder books, A Wrinkle in Time, and other childhood classics like Narnia and Mary Poppins. What will I read this summer? Well, I just finished The Outlaw Demon Wails (and I just checked it out Tuesday). I never know what I’m going to read until I see what the library offers….

  371. Woodmansee Street was cool, man, in 1965 despite being only one block long. Not only was it the gateway road to Woodmansee Park and the home of “Leadbottom” and his brothers, it was the weekly haunt of the bookmobile. My sister and I entered eagerly every week to soak up that lovely smell of books, books, books in the cozy (confined?)space, and we always left with books, books, books – the maximum limit, never enough – to be devoured quickly – too quickly. The wait until the next bookmobile day was always excruciating, despite visiting the library in between.
    To read this summer: The Life of the Skies by Jonathan Rosen and Three Cups of Tea.

  372. I have no memories of a bookmobile, but I lived a block away from the library and would walk over about every other day and check out as many as allowed. My favorite chapter book as I got older were the Nancy Drew series. I just finished Ken Follett’s ‘Pillars of the Earth’ and ‘World Without End’ and will be reading Barbara Taylor Bradford’s ‘Unexpected Blessings’ and ‘Just Rewards’.

  373. Chapter One – In which the wind is howling and through the door comes Captain Scratch, a villain if I ever saw one. (From Sid Fleischman’s “The Ghost in the Noonday Sun,” a complete but rollicking rip-off of Treasure Island.)
    No Bookmobile, since we lived right by the Leaside Library branch in Toronto. It made a huge impression on me as a child, to the point where I dreamed that I went up stairs in the foyer which never stopped and got all weird with blue light, until I eventually reached what seemed like a cockpit or control tower looking out over a lunar landscape. At the time this woke me up as a nightmare (because I was 4, lost, and the stairs wouldn’t go back to the foyer no matter how far I went) but looking back I’m like, Dude, the library was actually a SPACEPORT.

  374. Our small town did not have a bookmobile, but I, like many here, walked to our public library, toted as many books home every other week as Mom would allow (one for each year of our age), and was often told to stop reading and go outside to play.
    Favorite books were, well, most of them – but especially The Black Stallion series. I didn’t just want a horse, I think I wanted to BE a horse. (Not going to analyze that too much. Yikes!)
    By the end of summer, I will finish Matthew Reilly’s Six Sacred Stones and re-read John Knowles’ A Separate Peace (loved it in high school, but can’t remember why).

  375. Favorite book: Charlotte’s Webb is the all time favorite book for both my daughter and I. We read it a few times a year together, and we both have a copy…one for her nightstand and one for mine.
    Book to read before the end of summer: Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingslover

  376. I lived 5 miles out in the country growing up so I didn’t have access to the bookmobile then. We had the bookmobile come to our schools though and I remember how special it was when we got to be the one picked to go pick books for the classroom.
    I spent my first & second grade years at a small community school and then those were consolidated into 3 county schools–named Eastside, Westside, and Northside–you know how original those are, ha! Anyway, I spent my time in Library reading every Childhood American Biography they had, and I distinctly remember Mrs. Bell the librarian reading from Island of the Blue Dolphins to us every week. I don’t have a copy of that here at home so I can’t give a chapter title, but it was and still is a favorite of mine.
    Fast forward several years, I am now an elementary school librarian(of 30 years now) and I still love reading children’s books–a recent favorite is Inkheart by Cornelia Funke and the sequel Inkspell. I am still reading on Inkspell and I guess my favorite chapter thus far is “Meggie Reads”. If you like fantasy (which I do) you will like these books.

  377. I’m too young to remember the bookmobile. I spent summers in a small town in duchess county NY and read my way through the children’s section of that small library. I still remember how that 2 room llibrary smelled.
    when I was a kid I loved the “Little House” series by Laura Ingalls Wilder. I read all of them. I wanted to be her.
    I haven’t read a book in a while. I’m hoping to read something this summer. Having 2 small babies makes reading (and kinitting) almost impossible.

  378. chapter book: Any of the Betsy, Tacy, and Tib books by Maude Heart Lovelace, but especially _Betsy and the Great World_ where Betsy goes to Europe and comes home to find out that Joe really *does* love her. *sigh*
    What I’ll read this summer: _Soon I Will be Invincible_ by Austin Grossman. Ahhhh….superheroes.

  379. I love the whole Little House series! My favorite was The Long Winter, probably because I was growing up in Florida and had no idea that winter existed. Next up on my book list to read -Ladies of Liberty by Cokie Roberts. All about Jane Adams, Martha Washington, etc. Love the history!

  380. 1. Bookmobile came every Tuesday and parked at the neighborhood pool, it was only a block from the house so we visited it year round. Always had a nice driver/librarian and if you wanted a specific book you could fill out a card and they would try and have it for you on one of your next visits. The last visit our neighborhood had of the bookmobile was around 1979 they decided to take it further out in the county. The main library was only 4 miles from us so not a long trip.
    2. Ramona the Pest and Miss Piggle Wiggle.
    3. Julie and Julia

  381. What a fantastic post…I’m thrilled to discover someone else who is hooked on certificates. It’s a running joke in our family that I won’t do anything I’m not certified to do, and won’t trust anyone without a certificate to do what they do. It’s not entirely true…but it’s not entirely false either.
    Bookmobile memories – I have this vague recollection of discovering romance novels of the bodice ripper variety thanks to our local bookmobile. Is that possible? Weren’t they just supposed to be for kids books? Hmmm.
    Favorite Child Chapter books… – how do you choose? Any Nancy Drew… The Swallows and Amazons series… The Lloyd Alexander “Taran Wanderer” books (had me so scared I couldn’t put my feet on the floor for fear there was something creepy under the chair) and finally Gordon Korman… “I Want to Go Home”. Canadian author, super funny.
    Book of Summer 2008 – I plan to read “I shall not want” book 5 (?) in a mystery series by Julia Spencer-Fleming.
    Happy blogiversary guys.

  382. We did have a bookmobile come by my elementary school on occasion, but unfortunately it was a rather sad affair. This was in the early 90’s, so well past the Bookmobile’s heydey. I do remember they had a lot of outdated social studies books (Hey, what is this country called “Ussr”?). Being a bookworm, I tried really hard to find something to check out from the Bookmobile, because I felt bad for it.
    My favorite book(s) in my childhood were probably the Anne of Green Gables series. I read them all, even the ones about Anne’s children (snoozers). This summer I’m trying to get through Memoirs of a Geisha so I can read United States of Arugala.

  383. 1. I don’t have any book mobile stories BUT while going through my old school work, I found a summer reading list from when I was 12. It was a good summer, my first reading of “Where the Red Fern Grows” among others. A typical summer for me but my husband had to ask several times if I “cheated” and just wrote down book titles… Never, the horror! ; ) I know the pain of being told to “go play outside” when all you really want to do is finish the chapter!
    2. I have to pick just one? Anastasia Krupnik by Lois Lowery is one I picked up again and re-read recently. What a great book, so funny and touching.
    3. Land Girls by Angela Huth

  384. My favorite childhood book was “The Peculiar Miss Pickett.” Miss Pickett was two siblings’ babysitter and she was mysterious and magical. She would endlessly pull things out of a little shoebox that served as her suitcase (she was usually there for an overnight stay) and she knew the exact time of sunset and sunrise. The children never shared her magic and thier adventures together with their parents. It sparked my imagination like no other book and I have been unable to find it in print today. My copy is missing the first few pages and it makes me sad. “Good Night Moon” and Dr. Suess’ “The Sleep Book” were the books I read most to my children. “The news just came in from the county of Keck, a very small bug by the name of Van Vleck, is yawning so wide you can look down his neck…..” I have the beginning of The Sleep Book memorized! I’d definitely recommend that one to any parent.
    I’m reading “Hard Times” about the Depression right now and plan to read “The Spectrum” by Dean Ornish, MD. I am still hoping a book can magically give me good eating habits and transform me into a thinner, younger person. May be a futile hope, but I believe in the power of books!

  385. My only bookmobile memory is seeing one parked in the parking lot of our library and being very curious about what it was. I was only 6 or 7 at the time and really wanted to go for ride in the bookmobile. My mom explained that you didn’t get to ride in it, you just visited it like the library. She asked about it inside the library and was told that it was no longer in service so I never got to have a bookmobile experience.
    I had many favorite chapter books – Little House on the Prairie, Encyclopedia Brown, Pippi Longstocking, Nancy Drew, the Ramona books.
    I plan to re-read the Shell Seekers by Rosamund Pilcher this summer – it’s one of my favorite summer reads.

  386. Great contest idea!
    1) We did have a Bookmobile in our school district, but it only went to the two of the older elementary schools that didn’t have libraries, which sadly wasn’t mine. I have great memories of my school and local library and seeing the pictures on your blog reminded me of the weekly storytime I use to attend.
    2) I too, like many of your other readers, was horse obsessed and read and re-read the Walter Farley “Black Stallion” series and the Marguerite Henry “Misty of Chincoteague” books (Even convinced my parents to trek to Chincoteague one summer to see the ponies make their annual swim across the channel – a trip that invovled coming home covered in mosquito bites and trying to convince my dad that I could fit a pony in the trunk for the ride home).
    3) I’m just getting ready to read “Founding Mothers” by Cokie Roberts. Seems like good summer reading in the City of Philadelphia.

  387. Hey!
    1. I worked on a city bookmobile for 11 1/2 years (and drove it, too.) I have too many memories to pick just one…what an experience!
    2. The Egypt Game by Zilpha Keatley Snyder
    3. Marie Antoinette: The Journey by Antonia Fraser (in the audio format so I can knit while I learn!)
    Thanks for bringing back so many wonderful memories!

  388. We didn’t have a bookmobile back in the day, but the kids now get excited when the “Rosie” van comes to daycare with a new set of books from the library.
    I loved the Little House on the Prairie books, Nancy Drew and the Boxcar Children. I still love a good series to this day. When my sister’s wedding day coincided with the release of the last Harry Potter book there was serious discussion of my ability to attend. She bribed me with the book as a bridesmaid gift and then held it hostage until after the ceremony and reception were over.
    I can’t remember the title of the book next on my list, but it’s the second in the knitting mystery series by Maggie Sefton.

  389. No bookmobile memories. But, I used to love it when RIF came to town and we all got a free book! My son’s not at chapter books, yet, but I plan to read World Without End by Ken Follett to myself this summer. Pillars of the Earth is one of my all-time favorites. I’ve read it five times.

  390. I would LOVE to get to a bookmobile, but I have never heard of one, being from a TINY town in Oklahoma (under 1000 counting cats and dogs). Our school did have Scholastic Book Club which I was a proud member of and would save my books from the school year to read over the summer. My favorite chapter books were the Trixi Belden series and still have 2 tresured books with the tape still stuck on the cover to hold it on. I’m reading Stephanie Pearl McPhee’s newest book and will read again over the summer (does that count?) Or I might read Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander again. Nat Alea from OK

  391. 1) I was town girl so we could ride the bus downtown to our public library. I was limited to take the number of books I could carry. Oh, how I loved the smell of that building and to this day sniff an old book when I get one.
    2) ANY and all Nancy Drew books.
    3) Walden – I’m in a readalong on Ravelry Live Simply group.

  392. Sorry, I had to post one more book that I ABSOLUTELY love and got me through the 6th grade, “Are you there God, it’s Me Margaret”! I still remember doing the bust exercises at slumber parties with my girl friends!

  393. Favorite childhood book would have to be Little Women (Louisa May Alcott). I would read the sad parts over and over to my sisters until we were all crying.
    No bookmobile memories – perhaps I am too young – that might be wishful thinking – it’s more likely that we didn’t have them in Canada.
    The book I plan to read this summer is The Likeness by Tana French – which just came out Tuesday in the States, but unfortunately I have to wait until August 1 here in Canada. Oh well it’s something to look forward to.
    I can’t wait for the new book. My sisters and I are all fans and each had to have our own copy of the 1st one – none wanted to be without their copy for any lenghth time!

  394. 1. Alas, we did not have a bookmobile in my town but we did have a well stocked and somewhat stinky used bookstore in the backroom of an old lady’s house. She was scary but her son was worse. Big, brooding with hornrimmed glasses and one eyebrow. You had to dodge the fat furry cat who liked to job on unsuspecting readers from the tops of bookshelves.
    2. Anne of Green Gables and all the sequels. I read them endlessly. They joined us on holiday in the Rocky Mountains and to my Baba’s (grandma’s) house. I wanted to be Anne but it’s hard when you a chubby brunette instead of a skinny red head. Don’t worry. I got over it.
    3. I plan on reading “The Queen of Subtleties: A Novel of Anne Boleyn”. I’d be a liar if I didn’t admit that I have been heavily influenced by the BBC.

  395. We had a town library and my Dad would take me once a week. I clearly remember being one of the first girls in my group to read Are You There God, It’s Me Margaret? and insisting all my friends read it. Must have been twelve. I loved reading The Phantom Tollbooth to my oldest son – he was the perfect age to get all the puns. This summer I am reading the Tweak/Beautiful Boy combo and The Garden of Last Days. Congratulations on your anniversary! I really love your blog and learn so much! Keep it up! I’m also looking forward to the new book.

  396. In 1956 I moved from WV to Del. In WV I had lived in a very small town with no library except at the schools. In DE I lived in a very small town with no library and no car, but the bookmobile came every week. I had just moved 500+ miles from my family, was pregnant, my DH was away at work every day with our car and I knew no one in town. Can you imagine how important the bookmobile became to me? I am, and have always been an avid reader. I was amazed to realize that they would let me take out as many as 5 books a week! I still get excited at the very thought of that bookmobile and the wonderful people in it. I am 70 today and still read 3 or 4 books a week. We have wonderful libraries here. But oh, that bookmobile!

  397. In 1956 I moved from WV to Del. In WV I had lived in a very small town with no library except at the schools. In DE I lived in a very small town with no library and no car, but the bookmobile came every week. I had just moved 500+ miles from my family, was pregnant, my DH was away at work every day with our car and I knew no one in town. Can you imagine how important the bookmobile became to me? I am, and have always been an avid reader. I was amazed to realize that they would let me take out as many as 5 books a week! I still get excited at the very thought of that bookmobile and the wonderful people in it. I am 70 today and still read 3 or 4 books a week. We have wonderful libraries here. But oh, that bookmobile!

  398. 1. Oak Ridge had the public library where those under 10 got an orange card stamped once for every book you checked out on a line with the due date for returning the book which came with the child’s limit of 5 books per checkout period. Since the library was on the other end of town, I had to wait until my Mother had a longing to shop at ValUMart before a library trip was promised. Like me, Mother loved to shop and ValUMart was one of her favorite stores so the trip happened often enough. She would drop me in the children’s section of the library with a promise to be ready with my 5 books selected before she returned. It was agony to pick just 5 books. I would pace between the stacks pacing knowing my time was not long enough to make that choice. I had lists of 100s of books I wanted to read. Every trip I would somehow have the choices narrowed by Mother’s return. Those 5 books were never enough. By the age when I could have an adult card, I had about 7 of those orange cards all stamped front and back and stapled to each other in a thick stack worn on the edges. I wish I still have that stack of cards to remind me of the time spent in the floor of the children’s room at the library picking out books.
    2. Favorite chapter books: Anything Alice, In Wonderland, or through the looking glass either one. I love the Carpenter and the Walrus, those poor oysters, the lot of them. My grandfather used to read these to me when I was way too young to really get it and I have loved them ever since.
    3. Book to read this summer: Things I Learned From Knitting by Stephanie Pearl-McPhee.

  399. I was never on a bookmobile as a young one, but got to ride one while I was pregnant and working as a librarian at the public library. My favorite thing about that bookmobile was the driver it used to have, he was a real mensch, Bill. He touched many hearts and is truly missed.
    Every summer I try to read Practical Magic by Alice Hoffman, but maybe this summer I’ll settle for her new book, The Third Angel.

  400. I’m still interested in an upholstery contest, maybe later in the year when we need to feel cozier, and the nesting instinct kicks in? What about pillows? Categories – color, texture, shape, originality, retro, out-there? Then, from the winners in each category, you could have Best Of Show. We could all vote, like we did for the fantastic plush animal outfits. Everyone participates!

  401. No bookmobile memories for me – I grew up much too recently and more or less within walking distance of a library. I loved it, though, when my mom would take me to the library. The one nearest our house had these great padded cubby things that were perfectly sized for curling up in with a book or five. Since my mom used to volunteer at the library (shelving books mostly), I’d grab some of my favorite books and quite happily spend hours with them in one of the cubbies. At that age (five?) I adored The Stupids, Oliver and Amanda Pig, and Dorrie the good little witch (whose hat was always crooked and whose socks never matched). It wasn’t until a few years later that I really got into reading chapter books on my own (I have a winter with pneumonia to thank for that), but I remember tearing through the Ramona Quimby books and the Nancy Drew books. In retrospect (although I’m not sure I thought so at the time), some of my absolute favorites were Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransom, the Narnia Chronicles – especially The Voyage of the Dawn Treader – by C.S. Lewis, and The Hobbit by Tolkein.
    For this summer’s reading, I hope to get through Brightness Reef by David Brin, Finding the Elusive God by Fr. Paul Scanlon, and The Mighty and the Almighty by Madeleine Albright.

  402. I’m reading Mansfield Park by Jane Austen this summer. My son mentioned Mr. Filch’s (??) cat in Harry Potter is named Mrs. Norris, same as in Mansfield Park!

  403. I’m reading Mansfield Park by Jane Austen this summer. My son mentioned Mr. Filch’s (??) cat in Harry Potter is named Mrs. Norris, same as in Mansfield Park!

  404. 2. The Borrowers
    3. Animal Vegetable Miracle
    Love the bookmobile pics! I remember taking tall stacks of books out every 4 weeks from the library in the nearest big town and being filled with the thrill of the hunt every time we went there.

  405. I grew up in Detroit and had no bookmobiles, however I have wonderful memories of walking to the library with my sister. It was approximately 10 blocks away from our home. Being avid readers, we each carried a large brown shopping bag full of books on each part of our trip. The trip was part of the fun, because among other store fronts we passed a Corvette club and always were interested in the beer can pyramids being built in the windows. The most memorable day of our summer library trips occurred when I was somewhere between 10-12 years old. That was when the children’s librarian said I could start taking books out of the adult side of the library. One of my favorite series of books was centered around a main character named Beany Malone. They were set in Denver in modern time (for the 60’s) and involved some history of Denver and the formation of the railroad. I am planning to read Three Cups of Tea before the end of 2008.
    Thanks for the trip down memory lane.

  406. Oh Kay, your post brought back such wonderful memories! (I had a teal-colored stingray and the same seersucker short set – in yellow. Pixie too.) I grew up in Trotwood, Ohio in the 60s. Our bookmobile pulled up to the elementary school parking lot just before the end of school each year, and had that same unique smell that only bookmobiles have. But even better than that, our local library kept lists for each child of the books we read over the summer break (I must have lived in a really small town, huh?), and while I was never the girl with the most books read, I always wanted to be!! My favorite childhood books were the Cheaper by the Dozen series and another series about a family of jewish sisters who grew up during the Depresssion; sadly, I cannot remember the name of the author or the books. They were wonderful. This summer I’ve worked my way thru several books already, the most recent “The Shack” by William P. Young. Read on!!

  407. I grew up in Detroit and had no bookmobiles, however I have wonderful memories of walking to the library with my sister. It was approximately 10 blocks away from our home. Being avid readers, we each carried a large brown shopping bag full of books on each part of our trip. The trip was part of the fun, because among other store fronts we passed a Corvette club and always were interested in the beer can pyramids being built in the windows. The most memorable day of our summer library trips occurred when I was somewhere between 10-12 years old. That was when the children’s librarian said I could start taking books out of the adult side of the library. One of my favorite series of books was centered around a main character named Beany Malone. They were set in Denver in modern time (for the 60’s) and involved some history of Denver and the formation of the railroad. I am planning to read Three Cups of Tea before the end of 2008.
    Thanks for the trip down memory lane.

  408. I was raised in Appalachia; my father was a coal miner; there was no library nearby and the bi-weekly visits from the bright blue bookmobile were the highlight of my life. I don’t have a favorite book, rather a series. I read a collection of biographies and to this day, I still enjoy the personal narrative. My grandmother used to tell me I was nosy and wanted to know how others lived.
    I adored Abigail Adams and my respect for her was not diminished by the recent HBO series.
    While my parents encouraged my reading, the accompanying sloth regarding chores caused many disputes between them and me and I vowed that if I ever had a child who liked to read, I would never nag her about that habit. My second son tested my resolve, but I am proud to say, I indulged his passion, and as he approaches 40, he remains an incredibly avid reader.
    I plan to finish Vincent Bugliosi’s The Prosecution of George W. Bush for Murder

  409. I was raised in Appalachia; my father was a coal miner; there was no library nearby and the bi-weekly visits from the bright blue bookmobile were the highlight of my life. I don’t have a favorite book, rather a series. I read a collection of biographies and to this day, I still enjoy the personal narrative. My grandmother used to tell me I was nosy and wanted to know how others lived.
    I adored Abigail Adams and my respect for her was not diminished by the recent HBO series.
    While my parents encouraged my reading, the accompanying sloth regarding chores caused many disputes between them and me and I vowed that if I ever had a child who liked to read, I would never nag her about that habit. My second son tested my resolve, but I am proud to say, I indulged his passion, and as he approaches 40, he remains an incredibly avid reader.
    I plan to finish Vincent Bugliosi’s The Prosecution of George W. Bush for Murder

  410. when i was growing up we had a wee tiny library that always smelled musty. they had a story hour and it was like pulling teeth to get my dad to take me there (as a result, i take my son to story hour every week, to 2 different libraries). the library was a branch of the main one at the other end of the county and often would trade out books. the children’s section was maybe a 5X5 foot space in this tiny building.
    i remember looking at this monster book series and being totally obsessed with it (the books were about different movie monsters – frankenstein, dracula, etc). this is an incredibly weird thing to be into when you’re a 5-year-old girl. but those books rocked. i wish i could remember the name of the series or who the publisher was – my 5- year-old son would love to read these books as he also inherited my freaky monster gene.
    i haven’t stepped foot into that library in over 20 years, but i remember the musty booky smell as tho it was yesterday.
    my favorite chapter books as a child were the ramona quimby books by beverly cleary and all the judy blume books. i still get them out sometimes to read. they’re practically parchment now but i still get a kick out of reading them.
    i read a bunch of books over the summer. the last book i read was julie andrew’s autobiography “home”. i also borrowed obama’s memoir about him and his father. and i’m getting itchy to re-read “a tree grows in brooklyn” by betty smith.

  411. I did not have a bookmobile but did walk to the branch library every week with my sister. Growing up in Detroit, the library was about 12 blocks from our home. We each carried a large grocery bag full of books to return. The most memorable day was when the children’s librarian gave me permission to get selected books from the adult section of the library. This probably happened when I was 10 or 11. I remember reading a series of books about a female character named Beany Malone. The series started when she was about 14 and carried through her wedding. The author was Lenora Weber. I am planning to read Three Cups of Tea before the end of the year. Thanks for the trip down memory lane.

  412. Five Little Peppers Series
    My favorite bookmobile memory is from when I was a newlywed and had just moved to a new town with my husband. I didn’t know anyone and didn’t have a car, but the bookmobile came to our apartment complex every Tuesday. I spent that first summer of my marriage devouring every cookbook and romantic novel I could get my hands on.
    I plan to finish the Lord John series by Diana Gabaldon this summer. I am on book two.

  413. Chapter Book — By the Shores of Silver Lake, my favorite of the Laura Ingalls Wilder books.
    This summer’s reading: People of the Book by Geraldine Brooks.

  414. I grew up in a little town in Idaho, too small to have a Bookmobile (at least I don’t recall one). But I do remember the library. It seemed like a big building at the time—brick, with many wide steps you climbed to reach the front doors. How horrified I was when they put up signs that you didn’t have to be quiet anymore! I’ve had a lifelong love of libraries (and I still think that quiet is part of the deal). Yep, the Schwinn StingRay! I believe mine was metallic gold with banana seat and a white plastic basket with fake plastic flowers on it (pink, purple, turquoise). The colors eventually faded in the sun. My all round favorite book was Swift Arrow (by Josephine Cunnington Edwads). It’s the story of a Quaker boy stolen during an Indian raid, adopted by the Chief, and how he grew to manhood among the tribe. He later escaped and returned to his family. I believe this is a true story, as well as a thrilling adventure that my kids and I still love to read!

  415. In the central NY town where I grew up, the library wasn’t far from home, so we went there regularly in the summertime.
    The chapter books that I vividly remember are the Nancy Drew series – for some reason my mother indulged the pleas from me and my sister that we buy.every.one – and ‘Black Beauty’ by Anna Sewell, and “The All-of-a-Kind Family” by Sydney Taylor.
    Summer reading? I would like to read “Dreams From My Father”. But first I have to finish a Lakeside Classic: “Alexander Mackenzie’s Voyage to the Pacific Ocean in 1793″.

  416. No bookmobile memory…our town was too small.
    Chapter book: Dominic by William Steig
    This Summer book: Crunchy Cons by Rod Dreher
    Oooo, Pick Me! Pick Me!

  417. When I was 9 in 1976, we moved from Mt. Clemens, Michigan to a country home in the thumb. This was my bike ride to the book mobile: old, tumble-down barn on the right, Percheron show/work horses on the left, Mean Dog at beginning of steep downhill ride, BUMPY bridge over the Belle River, antique cemetery on the left and one last push into Riley Center. This tiny village was six houses, a church, two gas pumps with that old count-the-gallon ticking sound and a vintage general store, complete with weird, sagging wood plank floor boards.
    My ride was 2 1/2 miles on gravel, but I couldn’t be bothered to take my time since the book mobile parked near the church for only a short time. I cannot remember the books I got from the mobile, but I do remember that I was upgraded to the elegant status of adult reader on my library card so I didn’t need my mom’s permission to check out the adult books. The number of books I checked out had absolutely nothing to do with the fact that I had to get them home on the handlebars of my bike.
    I bought a pop and a Charleston Chew candy bar at the store and headed home, beginning with the cemetery. I usually took the time to look around and rest before I had to go uphill with Mean Dog waiting for me at the TOP of the hill this time. I always chatted with the Percheron’s, too, on the way home.
    One of my favorite books, around that time was “Ben and Me” about Ben Franklin and his mouse. I also loved Louisa May Alcott’s “An Old Fashioned Girl.” I had a copy from my grandmother and have never found one in any library or book store.
    This summer, I’m working my way through many adolescent literature books for my teaching coursework. I just finished “Octavian Nothing,” a Newbery winner that I need to discuss with somebody, but nobody I know will read it, not even my own, personal adolescents.

  418. We didn’t have a bookmobile in my hometown, but the Carnegie Public Library had a similar program. My favorite book as a chiled that I was allowed to read was “The Wizard of Oz.” However, I was jealout of my friends who were allowed to watch “Peyton Place,” which was a popular TV program at the time, so the summer before 6th grade, I checked the book out of said library. The head librarian immediately called my mother, who confiscated the book as soon as I got home. Sooooo, every time I went to the library that summer, I went into the stacks and read a chapter. What an educational experience that was for an 11-year old.

  419. We didn’t have a bookmobile in my hometown, but the Carnegie Public Library had a similar program. My favorite book as a chiled that I was allowed to read was “The Wizard of Oz.” However, I was jealout of my friends who were allowed to watch “Peyton Place,” which was a popular TV program at the time, so the summer before 6th grade, I checked the book out of said library. The head librarian immediately called my mother, who confiscated the book as soon as I got home. Sooooo, every time I went to the library that summer, I went into the stacks and read a chapter. What an educational experience that was for an 11-year old.

  420. No bookmobile for me – I grew up in a suburb of Milwaukee with it’s own library. However, if I close my eyes, I can smell that distinctive book odor. I hung out there nearly every afternoon – it was air-conditioned, at a time when few buildings were, and I consumed books like water. I can still feel the tiny metal plate on my library card – it was like my own little charge-a-plate ( a portent fo things to come,perhaps?)
    My favorite children’s book? Charlotte’s Web. My mother read it to me several times – her animal voices were incredible.
    This summer – I am reading The Kite Runner. It is both disturbing and fascinating.
    I don’t usually enter contests, but a chance for your new book? Too enticing to pass up!

  421. I was lucky to live close to libraries as a kid, so I didn’t go to bookmobiles. But I saw a bookmobile parked in my neighborhood in Jersey City, N.J., just yesterday. I’m so glad bookmobiles are still rolling!
    Favorite chapter book from childhood: Oh, there are sooooo many. But two books that I went back to again and again as a young girl were “Farmer Boy” and “On the Banks of Plum Creek,” both by Laura Ingalls Wilder. We were living in Jackson, Tenn., at the time. In the summertime, I hid both books under my pillows and read in my still-light room after I’d gone to bed. I read until the last dying rays of sunlight faded away. And then I’d lie there and think of Laura and Almanzo and all their adventures. I figured my mom and dad wouldn’t catch on. As an adult, I’m pretty sure they did. But they let me do it, anyway, and for that I thank them.
    This summer, I’m working my way through two books, one fiction and one nonfiction. The fiction: “Don Quixote” by Cervantes. The nonfiction: “Girls Like Us: Carole King, Joni Mitchell, Carly Simon — and the Journey of a Generation” by Sheila Weller. Both are outstanding. I keep one book by my bed and lug the other one on the train to and from work in Manhattan.

  422. 1. Bookmobile memory–I was a total bookworm, and I remember (I was about 8 years old) on bookmobile days sitting on our back porch with lemonade reading my latest book while all the other girls in the neighborhood were practicing cheerleader moves and tumbling. I could never do a cartwheel, and I blame the bookmobile.
    (I also remember that the bookmobile was airconditioned at a time when our homes were not–so I always tried to spend as much time as I could inside the bookmobile. They had to shoo me out).
    2. Favorite book–Skating Shoes by Noel Streatfield. All the “Shoes” books, really. To this day I can recite parts of it from memory.
    3. Book I’ll read this summer–My Antonia, by Willa Cather. (Obligatory Nebraska shout-out!)
    When I talk about the bookmobile, my kids think I’m from an alien planet–“Uh, Mom, why didn’t you just go to the library?”

  423. 1. Bookmobile memory–I was a total bookworm, and I remember (I was about 8 years old) on bookmobile days sitting on our back porch with lemonade reading my latest book while all the other girls in the neighborhood were practicing cheerleader moves and tumbling. I could never do a cartwheel, and I blame the bookmobile.
    (I also remember that the bookmobile was airconditioned at a time when our homes were not–so I always tried to spend as much time as I could inside the bookmobile. They had to shoo me out).
    2. Favorite book–Skating Shoes by Noel Streatfield. All the “Shoes” books, really. To this day I can recite parts of it from memory.
    3. Book I’ll read this summer–My Antonia, by Willa Cather. (Obligatory Nebraska shout-out!)
    When I talk about the bookmobile, my kids think I’m from an alien planet–“Uh, Mom, why didn’t you just go to the library?”

  424. One summer, I was 7, our sweet young librarian made me an i.d. card making me an honorary librarian since I practically lived at the library and had read just about every book in the place. She even taught me the Dewey Decimal system. I discovered Trixie Belden and The Chronicles of Prydain that summer.
    The bookmobile lady, however, was not my friend as she wouldn’t allow me to check out any Hardy Boys. As a girl I was supposed to check out Nancy Drew. I tried to tell her I already read those but finally I had to drag my mom in to talk with her. Afterwards I was allowed to check any book out, but she always glared and made sure to tell me,”don’t be writing in any of those books.” Like I ever would.
    I, too, had a pixie, a sting-ray with banana seat, and a love for reading. By summer’s end I hope to finish the Evan Tanner series by Lawrence Block –just fun summer-time reading.

  425. 1. No bookmobile, just weekly trips to the town library to check out, OVER and OVER…
    2. Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret. (Thank you, Judy Blume.)
    3. The Ten-Year Nap, by Meg Wolitzer.

  426. My favorite chapter book from my childhood is my favorite from the Little House on the Prairie series, These Happy Golden Years by Laura Ingalls Wilder.
    If you count September the end of summer, then there is Brigingr by Christoper Paolini. If not, I think I won’t get my current book, Eldest by the same, done before I start my classes on Aug. 25.

  427. No Bookmobile but I entered the library’s summer reading contest every year and always won because all I did was read. One of the prizes was no late fees for a year which wasn’t necessarily good for making me more, um, responsible.
    I rode my metallic blue Schwinn Sting-Ray to the library.
    I read and re-read Mystery Back of the Mountain. It was in tatters. It was excellent.
    This summer I’m going to read A Room with a View while I sit in a rocking chair on a huge porch at a lodge in Maine.

  428. Oh for sure my favorite chapter book was “Mandy” by Julie Edwards. I too was the kind of kid who had to be begged to go outside. And I’ve passed it on! My oldest daughter read Mandy and it’s one of her faves too!
    I’m reading The Story of Edgar Sawtelle” right now, and have waiting for me “Fearless Fourteen”, “The Condition” by Jennifer Haigh and on order from the library “Lost on Planet China” and “Oxygen”!
    I’m right at the end of the bookmobile days, I’m afraid, but I do think I remember it tooling up the dirt road by my house and thinking it was the coolest thing ever! They bring books to you!

  429. I think I was too young for the Bookmobile. I’ve never seen a real one.:(
    But I LOVED the library! Not a very healthy child, I had plenty of reading time, I just had to convince my mom to drive to town to the local small-town library. I read and re-read and re-read again all the Edgar Rice Burroughs I could find. (Tarzan of the Apes for question #2)
    I’m still an avid reader- although with 3 little ones it seems like I mostly get to read Berenstien Bears and Peter Rabbit– I am planning to read The Lord of the Rings by JRR Tolkien again this summer.

  430. I grew up in San Francisco ( 50’s to early 60’s) so we walked a few blocks to a wonderful old neighborhood library. But when I was 13 we moved out of the city to Vallejo, about 40 miles NE of SF. And there was a bookmobile!!! I was so charmed….it parked down at the park, so during the summer it was a two-fer. My all time favorite “chapter” book is Alice in Wonderland by C.S. Lewis. I’ve read it more times than I can even remember…..and in my teenage years in the late 60’s early 70’s it took on a whole new meaning, if you get my drift!!! I too am an avid reader am nearing the end of The Queen’s Fool, by Phillipa Gregory (she wrote The Other Boleyn Girl) and have been trying to decide what to read next. It might be The Red Tent…..I’m a sucker for historical fixtion.
    Happy Summer!

  431. I was a Navy kid so I remember book mobiles in some places and libraries at the Navy base in other places. In the Newport RI Navy base library, I started at one end of the children’s shelf and read all the way to the end by the tme my father had orders to move to the Pentagon. I spent a lot of time in hospitals for surgery and my fondest memories were of my mom reading Cherry Ames books to me. We read each and every Cherry Ames book and I am currently Cherry Ames, Oncology nurse (they didn’t really write that book, no one said the word cancer at that time). The books that one reader remembered about the Jewish family were “All of a Kind Family” and “More of a Kind Family” I think. I loved those books along with every book ever written by Louisa May Alcott. Being an only child, always the new kid, I read a lot. The book I am reading now is Bedford Falls by Russo, a Pulitzer prize winner from 2002 or so. It is a great description of life in a small town. Thanks for the memories.

  432. No bookmobile memories for me- none where I lived. I read and reread and reread again the entire Little House on the Prairie series. I absolutely love it. And, now that I think of it, that’s definately what I will be reading this summer.

  433. I forgot to add the next up on my book list! It’s the “19th Wife” by David Ebershoff and I have it on reserve at the library — hope to receive it soon after the release date.
    BTW — I love all the memories this has brought back, especially of sitting in trees reading the Nancy Drew books. What fun!

  434. No bookmobile where I grew up but a small library I had read my way through by high school.
    I read all the Nancy Drew’s and my sister’s Cherry Ames, so I had momentary visions of being a nurse or with Nancy, acquiring pumps in every colour. (I almost achieved this goal in my twenties) I was quite taken with her suitcase always packed in her little roadster, and that her pumps always matched her outfit.
    My favourite find of early adolescence was Mary Stewart, particularly Touch Not the Cat and Thornythold, which I am pleased to say my daughter finally got her nose out of horsey books to read this summer as well.
    I have already read most of my summer book list, including Water For Elephants by Sara Gruen, The Gathering by Anne Enright and I also just polished off Riding Lessons by Sara Gruen so anything else is icing.
    Loved these bookmobile photos, btw.

  435. 1. We moved around a lot when I was a kid, as my dad was a construction superintendent and as soon as he had completed one grain elevator, we were on to the next town. One summer, when I was about 12 or so, we lived in Greenville, Mississippi. My first order of business in any new place we lived was convincing my mother to take me to get a library card. Greenville turned out to be a pot of riches since not only could I lure Mom into taking me into the town to visit the big library when she had to make a trip anyway, but the bookmobile made weekly visits to the trailer park where we lived, as well. Libraries are still one of my favorite places, and I can never leave without an armful of books. When school was out this year and my husband asked how I wanted to spend my first day of freedom from students, I told him I wanted to spend an afternoon at the biggest library in Tulsa! I’m that much of a geek!
    2. I loved Anne of Green Gables. I wanted red hair so badly, and it was Anne that inspired my earliest writing. The stuff I wrote was mawkish and awkward, and totally informed by the mawkish and awkward writing Anne churned out for her and Diana’s literary pleasure.
    3. Right now I’m ready “Mummy Dearest” by Joan Hess, “The Shadow Presidents” by Michael Medved, and “The Shunning” by Beverley Lewis. I have to pick the next book for my book club, too, and am in a quandary about what to choose.

  436. No bookmobiles for me, but I LOVED buying books from the little Scholastic ‘catalogs’. I spent hours upon hours deciding which books to buy, carefully filling out the order form, putting my change in an envelope and sealing it really good. I must have been a really simple child, because I was so excited to get those books.
    I read Tom Sawyer over and over as a kid, and read literally every single book in our small town library about Africa and India. I searched the card catalog for ‘safari’, ‘jungle’, until I’d read every book on the subjects.
    Summer and reading go together like chips and dip, don’t they? I’ve been out of school 20 yrs, but every June, I get a strong desire to grab a blanket and a book and sit under the tree til dinner time.

  437. 1. Ah, the bookmobile. Having to read aloud from an adult book (stop that, you know what I mean), to prove that I was worthy of checking it out. Must have been around 1968 or so. I was so smug, carrying that book home.
    2. To Kill a Mockingbird. The first time I remember reading it was the summer between 3rd and 4th grade. It was in the back of the blue Rambler while traveling to KY to visit my Grandparents. Hot vinyl seats and shorts are NOT a good combination.
    3. A Place of my Own, by Michael Pollan

  438. Sorry, no bookmobile memories. However, I LOVED reading my Dad’s old books, Tom Corbet: Space Cadet when I was a kid. With titles like “Danger in Deep Space”, how can you go wrong???? True, there were not GIRL space cadets, but this was written back in the 60’s…
    I plan to read “The Creature from Jekyll Island” this summer. No, it’s not a horror novel, it’s a book about the beginnings of the Federal Reserve and our fiat money. Heavy stuff, but interesting. (No, I am most certainly not an accountant! LOL! Good accountants should be able to add accurately…;-)

  439. My mother and I visited our “real” library (in its storefront location) at least twice a week during my childhood, but hey– when the bookmobile started hitting our neighborhood once a week, we borrowed books there too! “The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe” was a childhood fave which I first discovered on the bookmobile; the unusual title attracted me. Since then I’ve always picked up the books with the unusual titles– their contents are so often rewarding!

  440. We have a mobile library service here in the UK, mostly for older people who can’t manage to get to town. But I use it anyway, as they seem to have the newer books there first. Trouble is, it is a bit like being on a boat – the librarian says it’s something to do with the airbrakes or an equally technical explanation. So I often stagger down the steps with an armful of books like I’ve just come off the QE2. My children loved a book called ‘Suddenly’ about Preston the Pig, and this summer I plan to read ‘The Book Thief’ by Marcus Zukas. I just had to buy another copy as the first one was stolen – irony or what?

  441. 1. No bookmobile in my childhood, but I have really fond memories of walking or riding my bike (yellow, with a multicolored banana seat) to our community library. I was allowed to check out only three books at one time. They also had summer reading programs, and an end-of-summer book party with sidewalk chart-art. Awesome!
    2. My favorite book was Heidi, the unabridged version. Who wouldn’t want to live on a mountaintop with their grandfather, sleeping to the sound of the wind in the pines and eating thick slices of toasted bread with goat cheese??
    3. This summer I will finish reading “The Company” series by Kage Baker. There are nine books, and I have read 7, but have held off on the last two, simply because I don’t want the end to come. They really are fantastic books.

  442. Oh, the Book Mobile meant civilization to me when I was growing up in South Louisiana and it parked right across the street from us! In the small parish of St.Charles (divided by the Mississippi River) all the small towns were linked together by the weekly trips of the Book Mobile. It was the social center of the area! My imagination was unleashed through the books that I read, Little Women, Jo’s Boys, My Secret Garden, Pride & Prejudice, Jane Eyre! And, then there was poetry, William Blake, Robert Browning, Emily Dickinson! There were craft books too, so there was embroidery and quilting and cooking!
    The Book Mobile still travels through St. Charles Parish and parks in front of my parent’s house. My mother is a favorite among the librarians not only because she loves to read but she supplies them with cookies and other sweet treats.
    (Thanks for the pictures from Harrison County Mississippi. The library system here there finally getting back on its feet after Hurricane Katrina!)

  443. Oh, the Book Mobile meant civilization to me when I was growing up in South Louisiana and it parked right across the street from us! In the small parish of St.Charles (divided by the Mississippi River) all the small towns were linked together by the weekly trips of the Book Mobile. It was the social center of the area! My imagination was unleashed through the books that I read, Little Women, Jo’s Boys, My Secret Garden, Pride & Prejudice, Jane Eyre! And, then there was poetry, William Blake, Robert Browning, Emily Dickinson! There were craft books too, so there was embroidery and quilting and cooking!
    The Book Mobile still travels through St. Charles Parish and parks in front of my parent’s house. My mother is a favorite among the librarians not only because she loves to read but she supplies them with cookies and other sweet treats.
    (Thanks for the pictures from Harrison County Mississippi. The library system here there finally getting back on its feet after Hurricane Katrina!)

  444. My town, too, was too small for a bookmobile, but I made regular visits to the Mark Twain Library (he lived the last years of his life in my town), where I borrowed countless Nancy Drew novels. But my favorite summer reading, every year in June when school let out, was the entire C.S. Lewis Chronicles of Narnia series. I knew that if I simply looked hard enough, I would find a portal of my very own into that magical land. This summer? I’ve just started Kalimantaan, by C.S. Godshalk, which I got at our local (small, rural) library’s July 4th booksale–I had first crack at the books because I’m a library trustee and responsible for setting up the sale!

  445. When I was little we lived outside the city across from the corn fields where we were forbidden to play,but did. Cornfields are great private places to read or dream. On Saturdays, my dad would drive us to the big library, the one with an enormous Gingko tree out front. The childrens’ section was down under the main library at the side, presided over by Miss Vansicle. She was stern, a true librarian stereotype, although I didn’t understand anything other than I was a bit afraid of her. I learned to open my books just so, and present them to Miss Vansicle in exactly the right position on her desk for her to stamp with the return date. My favorite childhood books were a series about an orange cat who looked like our Pekoe, and each week I took another Orlando The Marmalade Cat book out, reading and rereading them. When we moved to the outskirts of the city, the bookmobile visited us each week. It was such a treat, and we faithfully visited it. I was always happy to avoid Miss Vansicle’s sober reminders if I set the books incorrectly, but I missed my Orlando books and the Ginko tree.
    Now I visit our small town library frequently, and am always a bit anxious when I hand over my books for scanning. Miss Vansicle has me well trained! Now I read on the deck under the trees in summer, or on the den couch with the cats when it’s cold out.
    The old library in the city was torn down, the Gingko destroyed, and a new shiny library installed. It’s a beautiful building, and well stocked, but it isn’t my library, and I always look at the lot where it used to be, and envision the tall Gingko.
    This summer I am wanting to include some Torey Hayden books. I’ve read them many times but not lately,and her writing always reminds me of children I’ve taught.
    Thanks for reminding me of the bookmobiles! I hadn’t thought of ours in years.
    samm

  446. You really hit the memory nerve with this post!!
    Even the smell–Getting into the bus from the bright Winnipeg sunshine and the smell of mown grass and clover, into the dim and cool bus. Getting a crick in my neck from reading the titles on the spine. Also getting hollered at for
    having my nose in a book AGAIN!! Sneaking books from the verboten shelves–“you’re not old enough”. Checking the date stamp on the card in the sleeve in the back cover. And such wonderful travels and adventures to read about. I enjoyed reading Robinson Crusoe every summer, and Anne of Green Gables. There were some children’s mystery books which were from England which were fascinating to me, and although I’ve forgotten the
    names and titles, I remember some of the images that were evoked. I plan to read “Food, Sex, and Salmonella–why our food is making us sick” by Dr. David Waltner-Toews before the end of the summer. By telling you I’ll do it, I might actually do it. I’m not usually interested in reading this type of book, but the author is a childhood friend’s little brother, so there’s a kind of loyalty hooked into it.
    Marlyce in Windsor, Ontario, Canada

  447. You really hit the memory nerve with this post!!
    Even the smell–Getting into the bus from the bright Winnipeg sunshine and the smell of mown grass and clover, into the dim and cool bus. Getting a crick in my neck from reading the titles on the spine. Also getting hollered at for
    having my nose in a book AGAIN!! Sneaking books from the verboten shelves–“you’re not old enough”. Checking the date stamp on the card in the sleeve in the back cover. And such wonderful travels and adventures to read about. I enjoyed reading Robinson Crusoe every summer, and Anne of Green Gables. There were some children’s mystery books which were from England which were fascinating to me, and although I’ve forgotten the
    names and titles, I remember some of the images that were evoked. I plan to read “Food, Sex, and Salmonella–why our food is making us sick” by Dr. David Waltner-Toews before the end of the summer. By telling you I’ll do it, I might actually do it. I’m not usually interested in reading this type of book, but the author is a childhood friend’s little brother, so there’s a kind of loyalty hooked into it.
    Marlyce in Windsor, Ontario, Canada

  448. I too was one of those kids who took out the maximum books allowed every week at the library and had to be told to go play outside. One of my favorite chapter books as a kid (and still to this day) was “Through the Looking-Glass” by Lewis Carroll. One of the many books I plan to read this summer is “The Dubliners” by James Joyce.

  449. Wow… this is the coolest contest ever! Not only do I get to be reminded of all the books I loved as a kid, but it’s so interesting to see how people who loved the same books as kids now read such completely different things!

  450. We didn’t have a book mobile, but my summer memories are filled with visits to the library. My mom took me there constantly. It was a special treat when she took me to the downtown Houston library; I was overwhelmed by the choices.
    My favorite chapter books growing up were Little House on the Prairie. I pretended my canopy bed was a covered wagon. (Yes, I was a spoiled only child!)
    I’m currently reading Half a Yellow Sun, which is amazing. I really want to read Anne of Green Gables this summer–I can’t believe that I’ve never read the series!

  451. I am so excited to read all the wonderful comments and now I have at least 400+ new books to read!
    No bookmobile out in the sticks where I lived in Indiana when I was growing up. But I did use my library card whenever we went to town.
    My favorite books were the Nancy Drew mysteries, “The Clue in the Diary” started me on my diary/now journal writing.
    This summer I am reading “The Friday Night Knitting Club”. Great reading for the beach.
    I absolutely love your first book. I am in the middle of the Baby Kimono. Can’t wait for the new one!

  452. My favorite chapter book from childhood was “The Book of the Dun Cow,” not because I loved the story but because my mom picked it out for me. I always loved reading, and one summer day she came home from work with 5 or 6 books for me to read. I suppose she had stopped at the library on her way home. “The Book of the Dun Cow” was one of them. I was so deeply touched that she had picked out books just for me, especially for me, and particularly for me to read. It was a magical moment, though as a grownup I realize she was probably just trying to keep me out of her hair for little while.
    I plan to read “Good Omens” by the end of the summer. I’ve had that paperback sitting in my to-read pile for months and it seems like a fun thing to finish while sitting on a lawn chair and sipping lemonade.

  453. We had no bookmobile in my area and no certificates but we did get Kane county cougar tickets and/or personal pizzas at pizza hut if we did the reading program during the school year (my little cousins get 6 flag ticket now, what a rip off).
    My favorite book in elementary school was called Top Secret. It was great, the popular books to read were the Narnia Books but I wanted nothing to do with them. Top Secret was about these kids doing a science experiment to turn themselves into plants. I don’t remember much beyond that but I’m so glad you picked this because I almost completely forgot about it. I’ll have to look at the public library and see if they have a copy.
    I fully intend to finish Yarn Rules this summer. I’m to the part of sweaters and it is the funniest book I have ever read. My husband has now officially deemed me crazy because at night when we are reading I will burst out laughing and don’t stop for about 5 min. The best one liner that I have read so far is ‘fabric knitted so tightly it could be marketed as a bullet proof vest’ or something close to that.

  454. Here in East London, South Africa we still have book mobiles – only we call them mobile libraries. The mobile libraries are run by our local library. Each area around town is visited twice a week to give people the opportunity to take out books. This is great for the elderly and those who do not have their own transport. They visit all the retirement centres as well. I love the mobile libraries as they have all the latest and more popular books. I chase them all over town if I am looking for a special book.

  455. I grew up on the Tulalip Indian Reservation in northwestern Washington state. The bookmobile came to the corner of our gravel road once every two weeks during the summer. I was a devotee. I was at the corner on the appointed day a good hour before the bookmobile was scheduled to arrive. Part of that was out of anticipation, but part of it was about getting into the bookmobile first, so I could pick the most appealing and thickest books – otherwise 8 books wasn’t enough for two weeks. Later the bookmobile woman driver became the librarian at my elementary school – I thought she was the most amazing woman ever, to have had two such completely cool jobs.
    My favorite book was Half-Magic, by Edward Eager. I read it every summer for several years, and sometimes twice in a summer. There was something about the adventures of the kid characters that absolutely transported me.
    Still on my list to read this summer is Alice Waters & Chez Panisee.
    Thanks for prompting the memories.

  456. I lived in Marian, ND, as a child and do remember visiting the bookmobile, being in awe at the HUGE selection. There must have been many of visits as I read 100 books in the 2nd grade and was recognized by my teacher with a charm for my charm bracelet.
    One of my favorite books as a child was A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett. I love the story and still do. It doesn’t hurt that the main character is named Sara either.
    Right now, I am reading Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go for my book club. Me thinks I’d rather be reading about Sara’s stories of India.

  457. Being a child of the 1950’s, I remember the Bookmobiles fondly. We were fortunate enough to have it stop on our street, so I only had to walk to the Bookmobile. This made a vorascious reader out of my sister and I – preferring Little Women, Nancy Drew novels and My Friend Flicka. I remember sitting tucked into a overstuffed patio chair on the front porch – which was thankfully in the shade – and reading book after book. I recall that we would finish the limited number of books we could check out from the Bookmobile in such short time that my mother would drive us to the library where we could stock up again! Those were the days.

  458. Forgot to mention that I am currently reading Compulsion by Jonathan Kellerman and should easily have it finished in a couple of weeks.

  459. I would have been about four when we visited the bookmobile that stopped in San Lorenzo, a gritty sea of duplexes backed up to the railroad tracks in San Francisco’s eastbay area south of Oakland. I remember it was BIG and not new, and there was a stepstool that they put out at every stop, probably for little kids like me. I’m certain it was my first encounter with Dr. Seuss with The Five Hundred Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins and To Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street.
    Then my dad got a job and we moved to a little town on the other side of the hills where the library was smack downtown, housed in the same building as city hall and the police department with a little park behind the building. The librarian was a tiny little pillowy woman with lace collars who knew every child in town, and knew we would all lose our library cards, so she kept them filed in her desk drawer and checked books out to us without ever asking our names. My little sister took a crayon to a copy of Ping (a bizarre story of Peking ducks that live on a boat on the Yellow River in China, and the last duck in line returning to the boat gets whacked with a stick every day. Figure that one out; I refused to read it to my children.) My mother paid for the book and the librarian was very philosophical about it, perferring that children read and worried less about mishaps.
    In the summer of 1960, our family drove to Fargo for a family get-together, and my sister and I would buy Nancy Drew books to read & swap along the way. Our little sister’s spot in the car (a 1941 Dodge Luxury Liner – a huge boat of a car) was the back window shelf above the backseat. High times! I now own the car.
    I’m not reading as much these days; I knit! And knit some more and some more, so I imagine that I’ll be reading knitting books. But it may be time for my annual reading of To Kill a Mockingbird. Has any other mom disciplined an errant child by assigning him to read To Kill a Mockingbird? I did, and he understood the point I had been making. Smart boy.

  460. I would have been about four when we visited the bookmobile that stopped in San Lorenzo, a gritty sea of duplexes backed up to the railroad tracks in San Francisco’s eastbay area south of Oakland. I remember it was BIG and not new, and there was a stepstool that they put out at every stop, probably for little kids like me. I’m certain it was my first encounter with Dr. Seuss with The Five Hundred Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins and To Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street.
    Then my dad got a job and we moved to a little town on the other side of the hills where the library was smack downtown, housed in the same building as city hall and the police department with a little park behind the building. The librarian was a tiny little pillowy woman with lace collars who knew every child in town, and knew we would all lose our library cards, so she kept them filed in her desk drawer and checked books out to us without ever asking our names. My little sister took a crayon to a copy of Ping (a bizarre story of Peking ducks that live on a boat on the Yellow River in China, and the last duck in line returning to the boat gets whacked with a stick every day. Figure that one out; I refused to read it to my children.) My mother paid for the book and the librarian was very philosophical about it, perferring that children read and worried less about mishaps.
    In the summer of 1960, our family drove to Fargo for a family get-together, and my sister and I would buy Nancy Drew books to read & swap along the way. Our little sister’s spot in the car (a 1941 Dodge Luxury Liner – a huge boat of a car) was the back window shelf above the backseat. High times! I now own the car.
    I’m not reading as much these days; I knit! And knit some more and some more, so I imagine that I’ll be reading knitting books. But it may be time for my annual reading of To Kill a Mockingbird. Has any other mom disciplined an errant child by assigning him to read To Kill a Mockingbird? I did, and he understood the point I had been making. Smart boy.

  461. Oops. Sorry – when nothing happened, I clicked it again. Too long to read twice, and it’ll read pretty much like the first reading!

  462. My town had a library, so no bookmobile story, but I do still have the scars of a knitting injury. That’s what happens when your favorite place to read books is in a tree, and the tree is above barbed wire…yes, use your imagination. I fell straight onto the fence, stitches in both legs. But it was worth it because I was reading. I was reading Nacy Drew at the time, and those were my favorite childhood reads. This summer, I am reading anything by Daniel Silva (Moscow Rules) and Doris Kerns Goodwin’s Team of Rivals.

  463. It’s hot outside. Dusty hair waiting for Saturday’s Bath whether I needed it or not. My body doesn’t forget that summer I stepped into the tall dark bus. I was really somewhat frightened, as I was about most things dark and closed in. But there were free books in there and I was not going pass that up.
    ‘Only two books’ said the Library Policewoman. That’s what I thought she must be because doesn’t it require special Truck Driving School to steer this thing? My mother could barely manage our red and white ’56 Bel Air. Large top heavy vehicles worry me to this day.
    Ah, but the books! I really didn’t care what the subject. I judged a book by it’s cover. No cracks in the acetate? No ketchup stains or dog-eared pages? But did it have that certain well loved quality of soft pages, mixed with a creaky binding; a sure sign that it met the approval of several sophisticated 1st graders?
    “What? It’s pulling out in 5 minutes?”, I say to myself. I’m sure that’s what I heard her say because I could spend hours in a library. I had to touch each book to judge the best cover.
    So as I picked two picture books that I wasn’t sure would be the best pick and climbed down from the tottering slope of steps.
    I don’t think I ever went into a book mobile again. I returned my book on our next weekly trip to the Library. Where books should be properly kept, I imagined.
    “I know! How about a bus that picks me up and drives me to the Library with all my friends?”
    But I guess that would require a special Library Bus Driving School.

  464. When I was a kid my family moved every year. I grew up thinking it was time to move just about the time we had read all we knew of. When I was 10 or 11, we settled down in a small town with an old, stone library. Going there was the highlite of each week.
    My first summer job was in that library shelving books and “reading” the shelves (making sure books were put back in proper order). The book mobile would come and leave books for a month or so to supplement the permanent collection.
    The Borrowers was a memorable favorite series, The Island Of Blue Dolphins was the first “big kid’s book” I read all on my own.
    I’m currently reading The Taste of Sweet.

  465. 1.I never went to a bookmobile when I was a kid I lived close enough to walk to the library and I did all the time. My bookmobile memory is from a about 10 years ago when the library I work in now putits bookmobile back ont he road(sadly back off the road now but not surprising given that it didn’t look much younger than the ones in your photos). I ran into a patron that I hadn’t seen in months and when I commented on not seeing her she told me “I’m addicted to Shirley”. Shirley was our new bookmobile librarian.
    2. Picking one favorite children’s book for someone who grew up to become a children’s librarian is tough but one I remember vividly is Eleanor Cameron’s Court of the Stone Children. I want to go to San Fransico and find that little museum and I really want to move into the top floor apartment with the golden paint on the walls. Now that I think about it this book is also what got me interested in Marc Chagal’s paintings. I can’t leave it at one I have to put in a plug for Andrew Lang’s series of “colored” fairy books, the Rose Fairy Book, the Orange Fairy Book the Olive Fairy Book with there oddly colored illustrations, just black and white with touches of the title color.
    3. My “want to read” list is always much longer than time allows even when I listen to some so I can maximize knitting time but one that has been on my list for a while is Un Lun Dun by China Mieville a children’s book that I keep recommending from the great reviews but haven’t gotten a chance to read yet myself because the last time I had it in my hand a patron asked for it so I gave them the copy I was just about to check out.

  466. I grew up in NYC suburbia–narry a bookmobile in site. Our village library was the hub of our young existence. The cozy brick facade housed way-cool brass waterfountains (two different heights for different sized kids!) and a wonderful children’s room. I remember taking puppetry and other fun classes in the activity room. As I grew older the museum attached to the library hosted an exhibit on the Mayans that was the talk of the town for years!
    As a child one of my most beloved books was Understood Betsy by Dorothy Canfield Fisher. I must have read that book 30 times. I remember sitting in a large wooden rocking chair rocking and reading for hours.
    My children loved the The Penderwicks by Jeanne Birdsall. A new classic.
    We’ve done lots of books on tape this summer. A Week in the Woods was a standout. Combined with Call of the Wild (Jack London) and Brian’s Hunt (Gary Paulsen) it was particularly moving. As for real reading…I’m still struggling through Three Cups of Tea.

  467. I grew up in NYC suburbia–narry a bookmobile in site. Our village library was the hub of our young existence. The cozy brick facade housed way-cool brass waterfountains (two different heights for different sized kids!) and a wonderful children’s room. I remember taking puppetry and other fun classes in the activity room. As I grew older the museum attached to the library hosted an exhibit on the Mayans that was the talk of the town for years!
    As a child one of my most beloved books was Understood Betsy by Dorothy Canfield Fisher. I must have read that book 30 times. I remember sitting in a large wooden rocking chair rocking and reading for hours.
    My children loved the The Penderwicks by Jeanne Birdsall. A new classic.
    We’ve done lots of books on tape this summer. A Week in the Woods was a standout. Combined with Call of the Wild (Jack London) and Brian’s Hunt (Gary Paulsen) it was particularly moving. As for real reading…I’m still struggling through Three Cups of Tea.

  468. As an avid young reader myself, I pretty much read everything that the bookmobile held! my favourite bookmobile memory is those roll-y step seats. I used to love those. I always tried to find a reason to need to reach the topmost shelves just so i could acquire and then scootch around on those rolly-step seats.
    This summer is all about reading- I start medical school in the fall and i’m pretty darn sure that there isn’t going to be any reading ‘for fun’ for a while after Aug 20th! the last books on my to-read list are the Golden Compass series by philip pullman. At 28, I still love YA fiction the best.
    ps. I think that your memory of the freedom of the bookmobile via the bike is very true to so many. The best part of the book mobile for me was being allowed to go there on my bike BY MYSELF.

  469. I LOVED THE BOOKMOBILE. MY MOTHER READ TO ME EVERY DAY AND THE TRIPS TO THE BOOKMOBILE WERE SUCH A JOY. I LOVED LOOKING AT THE PICTURES AND THE CHANCE TO PICK OUT MY OWN BOOKS. I WAS VERY DYSLEXIC AND DID NOT MASTER READING UNTIL I TOOK UP KNITTING IN HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE. NOW I CAN READ AND SPELL AND I KNIT EVERY DAY. I TEACH PEOPLE HOW TO KNIT EVERY CHANCE I GET BECAUSE OF THE TRANSFORMATION IT GAVE TO MY LIFE! AS A PRESCHOOLER, I LOVED “TOUGH ENOUGH’S INDIANS” BECAUSE HE HAD A HARD LIFE AND WORKED HARD TO BE BRAVE AND KEEP GOING. IT GAVE ME HOPE. RIGHT NOW I AM READING “WALK IN A RELAXED MANNER” BY JOYCE RUPP. IT ENCOURAGES YOU TO LIVE IN THE “NOW” AND FOCUS ON THE BEAUTY IN THE WORLD AROUND YOU AND ENJOY THE MOMENT.
    THANK YOU!
    CINDY BUCK

  470. I grew up in a small town in upstate New York. We did not have a bookmobile, but for a while we had a bankmobile that drove in two days a week.
    I attended a three room school in the 1950’s that had two teachers, and a principal who taught the upper grades. The school library was one wall of the principal’s office. My favorite book from there was The Twenty-One Balloons by William Pene DuBois which I read several times. When I misbehaved in kindergarten, which, I have been told, was multiple times, my teacher sent me to the principal. Because he was teaching classes, he would set me on a stool in the back of his classroom with a Readers’ Digest. Because I could already read, I saw this as more of a treat than a punishment. It embarassed my perfect older brother who was in that class. Eventually I was put into first grade to keep me too busy to get into trouble.
    This summer I am pretty much sticking to light reading, and, among other things, I am reading through, and enjoying, the Mrs. Jeffries series of mysteries by Emily Brightwell.

  471. 1. I don’t have a bookmobile memory, though the girl in glasses in that last picture could have been me. I’m almost 30 and the children’s librarian from our local public library still remembers me because I practically LIVED in the library during the summer.
    2. Do I have to choose just one? Ramona Quimby, Age 8; The Wheel on the School; Harriet the Spy. These I read over and over.
    3. The Golden Compass

  472. 1. I don’t have any bookmobile memories, but I do have wonderful library memories. I got my library card at our local public library in Dallas, PA the summer I was seven. There I participated in the summer reading game, which involved moving around a board made to look like a giant Monopoly board and collecting Monopoly money for every book read. From then on I was a library regular. I volunteered in the children’s room of that same library all through high school, and my first full-time job after college was at the library as well. On the first day of my new job (which felt like coming home) the children’s librarian, who had checked out my very first book for me on my very first library visit when I was seven, gave me a hug.
    2. It’s impossible to name just one favorite book from my childhood, but the Little House books by Laura Ingalls Wilder, “The Saturdays” and its sequels by Elizabeth Enright, the All-of-a-Kind Family books by Sydney Taylor, and the Betsy-Tacy books by Maud Hart Lovelace were among my very favorites.
    3. The next book I’m going to read this summer is “The Wyndham Case” by Jill Paton Walsh, a mystery novel that a friend recommended to me.

  473. No book mobile in my town growing up, but our library did have a book-reading contest with a covet-worthy certificate at the end. :)
    One of my favorite chapter books was ‘Anne of Green Gables’ – what little girl didn’t want to have Anne as a best friend and want to marry Gilbert! Right now I’m working on Philip Pullman’s ‘His Dark Materials’ trilogy – book one (the Golden Compass) down, 2 to go…

  474. I have no bookmobile memories – just riding my bike to the library to check out and read the same book, The Ghost of Opalina, over and over the summer before 5th grade. I loved that book and am still trying to find a copy…
    Book I am going to finish this summer? Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s memoir – I have read everything he has written and had to read this first volume? of memoirs.
    Thanks for the wonderful blog – I usually just read but your bookmobile entry was so sweet and brought back lots of memories of reading a summer away.

  475. As a kid in San Diego in the 60’s, I lived about 1 1/2 miles from the nearest branch library, and my aunt (who we visited daily) lived about 1/2 mile from another, so we never saw a bookmobile. However, I think I might have been responsible for wearing out one of the copies of Little House on the Prairie, by Laura Ingalls Wilder. (Did you see that the May/June 2008 issue of Piecework has the pattern for a doily she crocheted in the 1930s?)
    My next book this summer will be Atonement by Ian McEwan.

  476. Kay, we must be twins! I had those same seersucker short sets, plus a pixie haircut and glasses. I still have the haircut and glasses. LOL,but ditched the short sets.
    1.No bookmobile where I grew up. Went to the local library all the time tho. My first trip to a bookmobile was at the age of 51 at the assisted living home where my parents resided. I would get books on tape for my legally blind 90 year old dad. Course I got myself some books while I was there.
    2.My favorite book was The Pink Maple House by Christine Noble Govan. I would love to get a copy but I haven’t been able to find it anywhere. I learned to make paper dolls from cutting up old catalogs just as the girls in this book did.
    3. I am just starting The Forbidden by Beverly Lewis, part of an Amish trilogy.
    Happy Blogiversary!!!

  477. 2. Favorite chapter book: The Wonderful Fashion Doll by Laura Bannon. As a kid, I read it over and over (I got it from the library, not a bookmobile). I wish I had a copy now, but it’s a collector’s item that sells for over $200. A couple of years ago I reread it at the Los Angeles Central Library. I had to request it from the rare books collection and read it under the librarian’s watchful eye, but it’s still wonderful.
    3. Book I intend to read this summer: The Mercy Rule by Perri Klass.

  478. 1. I don’t have a bookmobile memory – but I was a member of the Richard Scarry bookclub, where each month, I would stand not so patiently in line at the post office with my mom to pick up my books. I loved books then and continue to love books now!
    2. My favorite chapter book to read to my first graders is A Tale of Despeareaux by Camillo. It is a tale of a young mouse who falls in love with a princess named Pea. And a story of a young girl named Mig, and a criminal rat named Roscuro – a wonderful fairy tale.
    3. I plan to finish “The Worst Hard Time” about OK’s dust bowls – i’m into historical non-fiction right now…

  479. I never saw a bookmobile, but rode my bike to the local library at least once a week during my childhood summers. The library had the added bonus of being air conditioned, which in Minneapolis in July is a beautiful thing!
    So, as for a favorite chapter book from my youth, it’s hard to say, because I read several a week! but I loved scary stories, especially novels by John Bellairs, like “The House With a Clock in Its Walls,” and “The Letter, the Witch, and the Ring.” I have even read these again as an adult, and they are every bit as good as I remembered them.
    And, as for this summer, I’ve actually joined the adult summer reading club at my local library, where every book you read (and write a review about) gets you a chance to win a gift certificate! One of the next books on my summer reading list: “When You are Engulfed in Flames” by David Sedaris. Yay!

  480. I only lived in what could be called a neighborhood until I was 6 so I only have a few memories of the book mobile. It stopped at the end of our driveway which I thought was way cool but later my mother told me it was because she had been the one to specifically request that they come to our street. I have no idea if anyone else ever came.
    Some of my favorite childhood books have just come out of boxes for my son. One Monster After Another and Herbert the Timid dragon are the two I grabbed out first.
    The next book I plan to read is one by Charles Price. His wife is the manager of my LYS and it’s about time I read one. Mostly civil war fiction, but the latest one is Revolutionary era.

  481. We didn’t have a book mobile, but we a reader’s club. Where you could order from a monthly selection and the books were delivered to our classroom. I am a natural born shopper, so even in the first grade this thrilled me to no end. I got so excited each month when our teacher passed around the flimsy paper catalog to select from.
    Summer’s reading… Strapless (about John Singer Sargent’s Madame X) and The Seamstress (I have an advance copy to review for Amazon) and a Sara Donati novel (third in the series).

  482. We didn’t have a book mobile, but we a reader’s club. Where you could order from a monthly selection and the books were delivered to our classroom. I am a natural born shopper, so even in the first grade this thrilled me to no end. I got so excited each month when our teacher passed around the flimsy paper catalog to select from.
    Summer’s reading… Strapless (about John Singer Sargent’s Madame X) and The Seamstress (I have an advance copy to review for Amazon) and a Sara Donati novel (third in the series).

  483. I too am a bit young for the bookmobile. It sounds like my kind of mobile. I do, however, remember being little in the 70’s and going to the library with my mom. She would drop me off at the playpen in the childrens section and trot off to look for books. How’s that for safe?!?!
    My favortie chapter book as a child was the Betsy, Tacy, and Tib series. I loved them so much I went as Maude Hart Lovelace for Halloween in the 4th grade. What a geek.
    I am now in a book club. I have read a bunch of books this year and the only one I didn’t like was Suite Franciase. Up next??? A Tree Grows in Brooklyn which I have never read. I also am going to finish the Ender’s Game series which surprised me, seeing as I don’t usually read science fiction.
    Thanks for the contest… I love talking books!

  484. I too am a bit young for the bookmobile. It sounds like my kind of mobile. I do, however, remember being little in the 70’s and going to the library with my mom. She would drop me off at the playpen in the childrens section and trot off to look for books. How’s that for safe?!?!
    My favortie chapter book as a child was the Betsy, Tacy, and Tib series. I loved them so much I went as Maude Hart Lovelace for Halloween in the 4th grade. What a geek.
    I am now in a book club. I have read a bunch of books this year and the only one I didn’t like was Suite Franciase. Up next??? A Tree Grows in Brooklyn which I have never read. I also am going to finish the Ender’s Game series which surprised me, seeing as I don’t usually read science fiction.
    Thanks for the contest… I love talking books!

  485. I’m from DC so had the public library system. My favorite first book was Dr. Seuss’s Cat in a Hat, then Nancy Drew/Hardy Boys series.
    For the summer – Charlaine Harris Sookie Stackhouse series.

  486. I grew up on a farm in the middle of nowhere. Seriously, you go to Podunk, hang a left and drive another 30 minutes away from the remotest signs of civilization and that is where I grew up. I was always an avid reader but summers got pretty dull since I didn’t have access to the school library.
    One glorious summer, the Bookmobile visited the Land-That-Time-Forgot to bring books to us poor, underprivileged and practically illiterate children. I am sure there was some government grant that made it all possible.
    The Bookmobile was green, smelled like a mixture between sweat and mildew and may have carried 200 – 300 titles. Each week, it parked between the post office and Mr. Lee’s general store at precisely 11:00 and was there for exactly one hour. I nagged my mom to make her take me every week. Oh, the books I read that summer – Black Beauty, Misty of Chincoteague, My Friend Flicka (you see a pattern here). I was ecstatic.
    And then just as suddenly as it had started, the Bookmobile service was dropped for my area due to lack of funding. From that time on, I was forced to spend my summers reading the handful of books that I actually owned over and over again. Or picking peas in the garden.
    Now I live in a town that actually has a public library. My children and I visit it nearly every week. My taste in books has changed slightly over the years. I no longer pour over horse stories, I leave that adventure to my daughter. Instead, I will spend this summer pouring over Alice Starmore tomes on Fair Isle and Aran knitting techniques that my wonderful librarian has secured for me through interlibrary loan. But I will never forget that one golden summer when the Bookmobile came to town.

  487. I too am a bit young for the bookmobile. It sounds like my kind of mobile. I do, however, remember being little in the 70’s and going to the library with my mom. She would drop me off at the playpen in the childrens section and trot off to look for books. How’s that for safe?!?!
    My favortie chapter book as a child was the Betsy, Tacy, and Tib series. I loved them so much I went as Maude Hart Lovelace for Halloween in the 4th grade. What a geek.
    I am now in a book club. I have read a bunch of books this year and the only one I didn’t like was Suite Franciase. Up next??? A Tree Grows in Brooklyn which I have never read. I also am going to finish the Ender’s Game series which surprised me, seeing as I don’t usually read science fiction.
    Thanks for the contest… I love talking books!

  488. 1. Your post brings back such delightful memories. I lived for the Bookmobile in the summers. It was a light blue van that had Wichita Public Library Bookmobile on the sides. We lived across the street from my elementary school and the Bookmobile would stop in front of the school once a week. The day it was scheduled to come, I would sit outside on the front porch swing with my books and await its arrival. I always tried to be the first in line to get my choice of the available books. We lived in an old two story house and in the summer when it was too hot inside in the evenings, I would take a book and my pillow out on the front roof and lay out there and read as long as possible. I have always been an avid reader.
    2. Wow — it is hard to choose one favorite book from my childhood. I read all the Walter Farley books and pretended to be a horse. I read Nancy Drew and Trixie Belden. I read The Boxcar Children. But there is one book that I read over and over. I cannot remember who the author is, but the title of the book was Loretta Mason Potts and I have never been able to find a copy of it. It was about a little girl who went to live with relatives and found a secret passageway through her closet to a kingdom. I found it absolutely fascinating.
    3. I just finished re-reading the Merlin Trilogy by Mary Stewart and another book I plan to read this summer is the new Chris Bohjalian book, Skeletons at the Feast.

  489. 1. My children loved the bookmobile and it’s secret mystery when they were little (books! In a van! on wheels!) and so my fav memory is taking them to see the bookmobile
    2. It’s a tie between the Westing Game and Anne of Green Gables, books I read almost every summer.
    3. Breaking Dawn, the new Stephenie Meyer book.
    Thanks for the contest chance! I can’t wait for your new book!

  490. 1. A Bookmobile memory if you have one.
    No bookmobile memory here. Our town was way too small. The library was in an extremely small bank building. It was probably all of 900-1000 sq ft. I enjoyed going there because rarely was anyone there and it was quiet. It was just down the street from my mom’s gift shop on Main Street.
    2. The title of a favorite chapter book from your childhood or your child’s childhood.
    I guess my favorites would be those written by Judy Blume such as Fudge.
    3. The title of a book you plan to read before the end of the summer of 2008.
    I just finished reading The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. I loved this book and have been recommending it to everyone I can. It is based in WWII Germany and narrated by Death. GO READ IT! I just started reading The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen by Syrie James. I doubt it will come anywhere close to the Book Thief.

  491. 1. A Bookmobile memory if you have one.
    No bookmobile memory here. Our town was way too small. The library was in an extremely small bank building. It was probably all of 900-1000 sq ft. I enjoyed going there because rarely was anyone there and it was quiet. It was just down the street from my mom’s gift shop on Main Street.
    2. The title of a favorite chapter book from your childhood or your child’s childhood.
    I guess my favorites would be those written by Judy Blume such as Fudge.
    3. The title of a book you plan to read before the end of the summer of 2008.
    I just finished reading The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. I loved this book and have been recommending it to everyone I can. It is based in WWII Germany and narrated by Death. GO READ IT! I just started reading The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen by Syrie James. I doubt it will come anywhere close to the Book Thief.

  492. My mother started the RIF (Reading Is Fun) program in our small rural Missouri town, and twice a year a large van would lumber down our one mile gravel lane and deliver a ROOMFUL of books. I was in heaven. I helped Mom sort the books for the various classes, and I got to read all I wanted as long as I was very careful not to damage them. I remember a week-long book binge, followed by the happiness of watching my paperbound friends go to new homes. I can still remember the shock I felt when I learned that for some children, this was their very first book. Thank you, Mom, for a love of reading and an appreciation of volunteering.
    2. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith, which I read in a tree over the south creek.
    3. Shadow Over Shangra-La by Durga Pokhrel, who learned to knit in a Nepalese prison.

  493. I’ve always loved the idea of a bookmobile….although we didn’t have one in our town. Always wondered how they picked the books out of the selection at the library. We had a tiny stone library we visited at least twice a week throughout the year…and I’m still going! (same habit, different state, many decades later). As a matter of fact I volunteer there every Friday. Libraries, best invention ever!
    Best book as a kid was ‘The Secret Horse’ by Marion Holland…kids steal a horse from an animal shelter to keep it from being put to sleep…and hide him in an old barn. Loved it, loved it….maybe I’ll check the library & see if they have a copy of this ancient book (1959 pub date)and read it again!
    Book I’m going to read this week is ‘House Lust: America’s Obsession with Our Homes’.
    I think I’m about post #487…people either love bookmobiles or just maybe they’re lusting after your new book! Congrats! I’m looking forward to seeing it!

  494. Oh, man — the Bookmobile! Rolling into our neighborhood in the hot, hot summers. The kids books were on the bottom shelves, but I was tall enough to reach the higher, more grown-up content.
    Favorite: The Collected Poems of Ogden Nash
    And this summer? I’m slowly making my way through “Cavedweller” by Dorothy Allison, the woman who wrote “Bastard Out of Carolina.”
    It’s dark and delicious, like barbecue with a
    good cold beer.

  495. 1. No Bookmobile where I lived–but we had the wonderful North County Library (Anne Arundel Co., MD) to visit. Every week or two during the summer, Mom took me. I would check out 15-20 books. The children’s librarians would ALWAYS ask Mom, “Will she finish those in three weeks?” Mom would say, “We’ll be back in two.” And we always were. I read my way through the children’s section before age 10.
    2. “The Keeper of the Isis Light” by Monica Hughes and “Light a Single Candle” by Beverly Butler were two favorites. “Isis” is science fiction and has a lot to say about identity, life as a girl, and prejudice. “Candle,” about a teenager who loses her sight and eventually gains independence, was my first exposure to a young disabled character (a very positive introduction).
    3. I just zipped through all but the most recent of Donna Leon’s “Inspector Guido Brunetti” mysteries set in Venice. The library should be getting me the new one soon. I’m reading the Jennifer Crusie/Bob Mayer “Don’t Look Down” now and will start their “Agnes and the Hitman” when I’m done. Then it’ll be some urban fantasy–probably Kelley Armstrong or Patricia Briggs. Much fun!

  496. I’d like to chime in here, at entry number 500 or so and say how completed knocked out I am at all these stories. Really incredible. What a literate group! What a lot of fans of A Little Princess, which was absolutely one of MY favorites growing up, too. I think I had some secret fantasy about being an orphan.

  497. I was a library girl where I grew up in the Poconos, but I now live in Washington County MD–Home of the very first book mobile–yes it all started right here!! My favorite all time book is To Kill a Mockingbird–LOVE IT!! This summer I am reading Swine Not by Jimmy Buffett, as a brief vacation from all the Tudor history I have been reading. My next book will be Tom Sawyer–a pick by my 9 year old son, who is reading well above his years–gotta love a smart kid like that!

  498. Childhood chapter book — They Loved to Laugh.
    Book to read this summer — The Clothes They Stood Up In — just finished The Uncommon Reader — really good!
    Thanks for the contest! I loved the first book; it makes me think and inspires me. I’m looking forward to the second book!

  499. 1. A Bookmobile memory if you have one.
    I have a vivid memory of the Bookmobil coming to our school when I was in 6th grade. The boy that I liked was standing in line behind me and I was holding {Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret} He tapped me on the shoulder and said “That’s about bra’s right?” I almost died!!!
    2. The title of a favorite chapter book from your childhood or your child’s childhood.
    Any of the Little House books :o)
    3. The title of a book you plan to read before the end of the summer of 2008.
    I have The Last Lecture on my bed side table and hope to get to it before it gathers too much dust.

  500. I remember walking to the bookmobile to check out books. This was in the late 1950’s to early 1960’s. I was still in elementary school when a permanent library building was built on the corner of the area where the school was located. I remember a big controversy about the public library using some of the school’s playground. We still had plenty of space to play, and the building was built. It seems like the bookmobile came once a week. It parked at the edge of the shopping center parking lot. We lived behind the shopping center, so it wasn’t that far for us to walk. I was so thrilled to be able to check out books. I still love to read. I remember reading Beautiful Joe. It was about a dog in England who had bad masters who mistreated him, cutting his ears off and docking his tail in an inhumane way. I cried my eyes out. It did have a good ending, though. Beautiful Joe finally got a good master. I work in a public library now. I love helping our patrons pick out good books. We also check out movies.

  501. Just the other day my cousin and I were reminiscing about summers and reading. Our grandmother encouraged us to read all the time; summers were no exception. (I think she knew even then in the 50’s and 60’s that children tend to forget things learned in school if their brains weren’t kept active while on vacation.)
    Connie, my cousin, and I walked about a mile from our neighborhood to a rather exclusive shopping area to visit the local Bookmobile. I vividly recall our first visit to the Bookmobile. The attendants were not very nice. At first, they ignored us. Then they helped other children while we stood in line to check out our books. Surely, two little Black girls weren’t seriously thinking of checking out two huge stacks of books. Those “Library Ladies” didn’t know how determined we were to read every book they had in that big old bus. Eventually one of the ladies helped us and took extreme care to explain that we’d have to pay for the books if we lost or damaged them in any way. Again, they didn’t know how much we treasured books and would never even fold a page down to mark our stopping point. By the end of the summer, the “Library Ladies” and we were good friends.
    Favorite Chapter Book: Little Women
    Book to Read this Summer: The Shipping News by Annie Proulx

  502. Totally a city girl so no bookmobile stories. But we have a beautiful old library and the childrens department used to be in the basement where it was dark and quiet. Really loved it there with all the books.
    Growing us I also read all of the Nancy Drew series and the entire Box Car Children series with my son. Mystries are obviously my favorite. I never have less than 5 books in my queue to read. Finished Isabel Allende’s book Paula and I am continuing with her book the Stories of Eva Luna.
    Good luck with your new book release. Can’t wait.

  503. I don’t actually think my town had a bookmobile while I was growing up. (We did however, have 2 branches of the county library, both accessible by bus.) We did have the Zoomobile, which brought interesting and scary animals (like snapping turtles. I dropped it on its back. Turtles hate me) to local schools and camps. However, my first year of teaching I taught for a small private school, and a bookmobile came monthly. One little girl always argued with the librarian. The kids were only allowed to take out 5 books, and this little girl need far more than 5 books a month!
    I just finished reading Laurie Notaro’s “I Love Everybody (And other lies)” She is so funny, she almost makes me pee my pants every time. I’m hoping to read “Persuasion” this summer. There’s a reference to it in the movie “The Lake House” and I’m curious.

  504. 2. Just one? Hmmm…probably Meet Molly, of the American Girls series. It was my first chapter book, a gift for starting first grade.
    3. Cat Women: Female Writers on Their Feline Friends.

  505. We lived in the middle of a big city so did not have a lot of bookmobiles. The library was my favorite place and I was so proud to get my first card at age 5. My allout favorite book as a young child — which my sister always reminds me of – was “Reddy Fox” about a group of woodland creatures (including a buzzard) and their adventures. The book cover was as red as the fox and I read it I read it over and over again.
    A friend and I are re-reading The Great Gatsby together and that’s my August Book goal. I think I will appreciate Fitzgerald more the second time around.
    You pick fun contests.

  506. Fabulous pictures, I too remember summer reading and the certificates “won” after finishing a required number of books.
    Like many young girls ( of a certain decade) I loved Cherry Ames and wish my parents had saved those books.
    2 ) my girls loved everything from The Saddle Club books to Harry Potter as they grew up.
    3) I’m on the reserve list for Barbara Walter’s Audition this summer.
    Can’t wait for the new book loved the first .

  507. Fabulous pictures, I too remember summer reading and the certificates “won” after finishing a required number of books.
    Like many young girls ( of a certain decade) I loved Cherry Ames and wish my parents had saved those books.
    2 ) my girls loved everything from The Saddle Club books to Harry Potter as they grew up.
    3) I’m on the reserve list for Barbara Walter’s Audition this summer.
    Can’t wait for the new book loved the first .

  508. Fabulous pictures, I too remember summer reading and the certificates “won” after finishing a required number of books.
    Like many young girls ( of a certain decade) I loved Cherry Ames and wish my parents had saved those books.
    2 ) my girls loved everything from The Saddle Club books to Harry Potter as they grew up.
    3) I’m on the reserve list for Barbara Walter’s Audition this summer.
    Can’t wait for the new book loved the first .

  509. Fabulous pictures, I too remember summer reading and the certificates “won” after finishing a required number of books.
    Like many young girls ( of a certain decade) I loved Cherry Ames and wish my parents had saved those books.
    2 ) my girls loved everything from The Saddle Club books to Harry Potter as they grew up.
    3) I’m on the reserve list for Barbara Walter’s Audition this summer.
    Can’t wait for the new book loved the first .

  510. We didn’t have a bookmobile in Berkeley, CA,but we did have great libraries! While a big fan of American Girl books, I really loved reading Hans Brinker after my skating lessons. I’ve now graduated to bigger and more boring things, trying to get my reading for next semester finished. Besides Big Scary Chemistry Book for College Students, I’m almost done with In Defense of Food.

  511. 1. My favorite Bookmobile memory was in a 1980’s era Bookmobile. It was the summer between 2nd and 3rd grade, and the bookmobile stopped in our apartment complex once a week. I would check out as many books as I could carry (can you say Babysitter’s Club?) and start reading them before I even left the parking lot. That summer, I read every age-appropriate book in the entire bookmobile. By the end of the summer, I would be scanning the shelves for something new, and grabbing a few of my old favorites to read again.
    2. My favorite book from that time was “The Secret Garden”. It always evoked so many emotions, and I loved the descriptions of the colors.
    3. I am currently laid up recovering from knee surgery, so I plan to read a lot. Right before surgery, I went to the library and got Isabel Allende’s “Zorro”. I loved “Daughter of Fortune” and “Portrait in Sepia” so I hope this one is good, too.

  512. No bookmobile stories, although when I was in elementary school, we had a reading contest where you’d get a button if you read a certain number of books. I was all over that! I also loved the time of year when the elementary school library would have a book sale. Even when I was a kid I hoarded books like I was in Fahrenheit 451!
    Favorite childhood book: The Doll in the Garden, by Mary Downing Hahn. It was a ghost story, and I read it over and over until the cover threatened to fall off.
    Book to read this summer: Going Postal, by Terry Pratchett. I read Good Omens a couple years ago, and now that I’ve worked through several Neil Gaiman novels I want to catch up on my Pratchett.

  513. Sadly, I attended an elementary school that had no library so the bookmobile came ONCE a month. Every month the librarian would hold up a Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle book and ask who wanted it. Every hand shot into the air…me!me! But,I was never chosen. Happily for me, I had a mother who loved the library and took us frequently. I checked out a Mrs. Piggle Wiggle only to find out I really didn’t care for them. Fast forward to my adult years when I became a third grade teacher and later a school librarian. And never did I push a Mrs. Piggle Wiggle.
    My favorite book as a child was Little Women. I still cry when Beth dies.
    This summer I want to read “The Beautiful Things that Heaven Bears” by Mengestu.

  514. 1. I don’t have a bookmobile memory, but I do remember summer afternoons spent at the library to 1) get credit for all the reading I was doing in the summer reading program and then 2) watching sort of creepy cartoon versions of Charlotte’s Web, The Hobbit and another movie, a live action one, about a toy — a canoe perhaps?– that is lost, and somehow makes it to a creek, than a river, etc. If anyone remembers the title of that 1970’s lost toy movie, I’d love to know what it is!
    2. Favorite chapter book from my childhood? So many great choices, but one that I read and re-read was Betty Smith’s A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. I loved that book!
    3. A book I plan to read before the end of this summer? I’m slowly — as in stretching it out so the pleasure will last as long as possible– making my way through the Josephine B triology, so Sandra Gullard’s Mistress of the Sun and The Last Great Dance on Earth.

  515. 1. At Gibbs Allbright elementary school in northeast Arkansas, we used a bookmobile all the time because with all the boomer kids, we were using what had been the school’s library for a classroom. This took me a while to remember the reason, but I have a vivid memory of the bookmobile being parked where the buses were after school. The bookmobile was right next to the little out-building (a.k.a. shed) where you could buy a coke during afternoon recess if you had a dime. Never morning recess. Only afternoon recess. You could use two nickels, but everyone knows a dime is better.
    2. Rumer Gooden’s The Doll’s House and E. B. White’s Charlotte’s Web.
    3. Tana White’s The Likeness and, if the knitting goddesses would allow, Mason-Dixon Knitting Outside the Lines.

  516. 1. No Bookmobile memories. I was a city kid but I could walk to the library whenever I wanted. I’ve never had a bike. I would join the library’s Summer Reading Group, the reward was a movie and ice cream in the Main Library.
    2. My daughter and I both loved the Beezus and Romona books by Beverly Cleary
    3. This summer I plan to read Huckleberry Finn (for the first time!)for the Ravelry group Reading 19th Century Novels, and Like Water For Elephants by Sara Gruen

  517. The book mobile didn’t come by where I grew up, but I did spend a lot of time at the library and reading. I actually got in trouble one time and my parents took all of the books out of my room as part of my punishment (I was a sad little kid).
    In Which Pooh and Piglet Go Hunting and Nearly Catch a Woozle — Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne
    I just got the whole Silence of the Lambs books I plan on reading those before I start school in Oct.

  518. I didn’t have a bookmobile as a kid, but my school and local library participated in “book it!” It was awesome. I got to read all summer long and earn free personal pan pizzas from pizza hut?! It was a major highlight of my grade school years. My favorite chapter book was A Wrinkle in Time. I’ll pick that book to this day and re-read it. I don’t have any idea how many times I read it and I never get sick of it.

  519. I didn’t have a bookmobile as a kid, but my school and local library participated in “book it!” It was awesome. I got to read all summer long and earn free personal pan pizzas from pizza hut?! It was a major highlight of my grade school years. My favorite chapter book was A Wrinkle in Time. I’ll pick that book to this day and re-read it. I don’t have any idea how many times I read it and I never get sick of it.

  520. I didn’t have a bookmobile as a kid, but my school and local library participated in “book it!” It was awesome. I got to read all summer long and earn free personal pan pizzas from pizza hut?! It was a major highlight of my grade school years. My favorite chapter book was A Wrinkle in Time. I’ll pick that book to this day and re-read it. I don’t have any idea how many times I read it and I never get sick of it.

  521. We didn’t have a Bookmobile when I was growing up but in the mid 1970’s when I was a young mom with two little kids and no car, living in a town of 600, the Bookmobile was the highlight of our week.
    Childhood book title: not great literature but I absolutely loved the Trixie Belden series. My favorite was Trixie Belden and the Mystery of the Mansion. Both of my daughters also loved Trixie (especially the books by the original author whose name escapes me….she wasn’t important, Trixie and the adventures were!) and I can’t believe I’m telling this but the three of us (ages 57, 35, and 26) still pretend we are Bobwhites of the Glen, solving mysteries like The Mystery of the Strange Man at Hobby Lobby and The Mystery of the Yucatan (a week long adventure at a resort….how many other vacationers were living out their childhood fantasies!) Aaah, good times!

  522. Favorite chapter book from my childhood: Once on a Time by A. A. Milne. The last book I read that completely transported me, body and soul, into the pages. After that, a teeny piece of myself has always stayed in the real world. Sigh.
    Book I plan to read this summer: Watership Down (actually a re-read) with my kids.

  523. The bookmobile would stop nearly right in front of our house and I would rush out to be the first to board. I never could get enough books to read and still suffer from that glorious addiction! My good friend’s mother was the book lady and I could sometimes sneak an “adult” book out from the grown-up section.
    My most favorite books were dog and horse stories with the all-time most loved being BLACK BEAUTY. I still read that book once every several years.
    This summer I am looking forward to reading THE STORY OF EDGAR SAWTELLE – just waiting for my turn on the reserve list.

  524. In Goshen, Indiana we had a genuine Carnegie library with silhouettes of storybook characters embedded in the stone floor in the basement children’s section. In the late 60’s a new library was under construction and for each book we read that summer we received a little sticky paper brick to put on the front of a picture of the fancy new one-story building. I covered mine completely. To accomplish that I believe I read all the Little House, Cherry Ames, Misty(Marguerite Henry), Trixie Belden, Donna Parker, and Madeline L’Engle books I could get my hands on. These Happy Golden Years was a favorite.
    This summer I will finish So Brave,Young,and Handsome by Leif Enger alternating with The $64 Tomato by William Alexander, and Things I Learned from Knitting …whether I wanted to or not, by Stephanie Pearl-McPhee.

  525. My mom *drove* the county bookmobile. I can’t find a pic (I moved recently), but it was a tractor-trailer type rig. Not only did she have to get a commercial driver’s license to drive it, she was the librarian as well! As if that wasn’t enough, she won the design contest of what the paint job on the trailer should look like! It had a rainbow coming down to the pot of gold that had books in it. It’s more like, in my memories, my Mom *was* the bookmobile’s heart and soul. Sadly budget cuts downsized, then eliminated the bookmobile, but Mom is still a librarian. And when a teacher took a copy of Stephen King’s IT away from me when I was 12 (thought I was too young for it), my Mom marched right down to the office to get it back for me. The next year, she defended me when a teacher thought I hadn’t *really* read a 1000 page book for a book report (I had). Reading was more than something to do in my house growing up, it was part of who I was, and still am. I’m still grateful and Mom just emailed me to remind me to go and get my library card in my new town,(that’s more important than my new driver’s license, apparently)!

  526. There was no bookmobile where I lived, but I did get my mom to take me to our dank little public library often, especially during the summer months.
    One of my favourite books in childhood was the Phantom Tollbooth. My summer reading this year: The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood.

  527. I love the pictures! How classic! When I was a kid the library in our smallish town had pretty much grown up beyond the bookmobile stage. But somehow I still remember the thrill of the bookmobile coming. It was about a 5 mile drive to the branch that I see (looking at my library history page!) was built 2 years before I was born. I remember the bookmobile being more of a school bus and coming to a grocery store close to us.
    I had a favorite series of books growing up that was about children growing up in other countries. I have no idea what the series was called. After that – Encyclopedia Brown. And in 6th grade I started a Nancy Drew club! My kids love the “Magic Treehouse” series.
    I have “Pillars of the Earth” on my list to read this summer but I’m not sure I’ll get to it. Next month’s book group book is “Interpreter of Maladies.”
    I’d love to win your book – thanks for the chance!

  528. Kay,
    You have absolutely touched my librarian’s heart. No bookmobile memories for me — my Northern California town was too small for anything but a one-room Carnegie library across the street from my parents’ store. Childhood library story? The rule at that time (mid-60s) was that a child had to be in the second grade to have a library card. But I wanted one when I was a first-grader and was not about to wait. After all, I could already read; why should I have to wait a whole year when there all those books were waiting for me. I enlisted my mother to approach the forbidding librarian (Mrs. Harris) on my behalf and insist that I be given my own library card. And it worked!
    Absolute,hands-down favorite childhood book: Caddie Woodlawn by Carol Ryrie Brink
    Summer read: Musicophilia by Oliver Sacks
    Bonus: The Bookmobile operated by my own fine employer: http://www.oaklandlibrary.org/Branches/West/bkm/index.htm
    xoxo
    Kathy

  529. No bookmobile memories here – I only wish. As it was, my parents had to drag me out of bookstores and libraries. I, too, was forced when lounging around with a pile of books to get off my behind and get outside.
    Most favourite chapter book ever was The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole by Sue Townsend. Loved, loved, loved it! I just read Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction, and I nearly peed my pants. He’s such a loveable turd.
    Before the summer is over, I plan to read A Good House by Bonnie Burnard. I’ve had this book around for years – it keeps getting lost under my bed.

  530. 1. I did not go to a bookmobile. However, I was taken to a library probably 4 miles away via bike. Only I rode SIDE SADDLE across the horizontal bar which connects the downtube beneath the seat to the fork. Talk about pain in the behind.
    2. A favorite book from my childhood: Jacob Have I Loved by Katherine Patterson.
    3. A book for this summer, Nicholas Again, which I will read to my sons. The story of a mischievous boy & friends, for two mischievous boys.

  531. The bookmobile came to the top of our neighborhood once a week. My parents both worked, so I was home alone after school. I would walk or bike (an orange boys’ 5 speed with black banana seat) up to the bookmobile, well before it was supposed to be there, to make sure I would have enough time to get _enough_ books! I went through about 2 a day during junior high.
    Little Women…I now have kids named Beth and Teddy ;-)
    I intend to read The Witches of Karres by Mercedes Lackey, as soon as I get a copy. I’m in the middle of The Thirteenth Tale right now.

  532. 1. No bookmobile in the Cleveland suburbs. However, I was taken by bike to a library 4 miles away, probably weekly. No seat or Burley in the 70s. I rode SIDE SADDLE on the cross bar which connects the down tube to the front wheel’s fork. Ouch.
    2. Favorite book: Jacob Have I Loved by Katherine Patterson.
    3. Reading this summer: Nicholas Again, by Goscinny and Sempe, to my children. Hilarious tales of a mischievous little boy and his friends, perfect for two mischievous boys.

  533. No bookmobile memories here, my mother took us to the library. My favorite books when I was a kid: Nancy Drew. I read every one I could get my hands on. And now I’m trying to finish “All Aunt Hagar’s Children” by Edward P. Jones before the end of the summer.

  534. No bookmobile memories here, my mother took us to the library. My favorite books when I was a kid: Nancy Drew. I read every one I could get my hands on. And now I’m trying to finish “All Aunt Hagar’s Children” by Edward P. Jones before the end of the summer.

  535. We didn’t have bookmobiles where I lived (NYC), so, I don’t have an actual book mobile memory but I do have a virtual one thanks to the RIF (Reading Is Fundamental) TV commercials of the early 70s. This frequent commercial had a drawing of the outside of a bookmobile on it and Pinnochio. I think he too was a drawing as opposed to animation, but I’m not sure. Despite the crayon drawings and kid-like look of the commercial the voice of the commercial was very somber. And at the end in a deep man’s voice (as I recall), it said “Reading is FUND-Ah-Mental. Teach a child to read. Reading is FUND-Ah-mental.” To be honest, I don’t quite remember if that second sentence is correct, but that sonorous voice intoning “FUND-Ah-Mental” is etched into my brain FOR-ev-AH. O.K., so back then I was an avid, voracious, 6 year-old who wanted to read forever. However, my mother had other ideas. I believe they had something to do with eating, and cleaning my room, and similar outlandish ideas.
    My mother won each and every reading battle (that’s my memory anyway) and I recall walking over to her, defeated in my plan to read forever, looking her straight in the eye and saying very seriously “You should be happy I read. Lots of parents want their kids to read. They make them read, and you don’t have to do that. Reading is FUND-ah-men-TAL!” The reason I love this memory so much is that while I made this argument to my mother at least daily, I had no idea what “FUND-ah-men-TAL!” meant! But that little gap in my knowledge deterred me not at all. If it was good enough for the RIF commercials it was good enough for me. To compensate for the knowledge gap, I did my best to mimic the somber intonation of the voice on TV. My fundamental had feeling! And that wide-eyed earnest 6 year-old delivery. My mother would just stare at me and say nothing. How she kept from laughing I’ll never know.
    2. My favorite childhood chapter book hands-down was Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder.
    3. Ironically, a few months ago I decided to reread the Little House books since I haven’t read them in about 35 years. I also really want to read Middlesex.

  536. Wow! Unbelievable number of comments, and so fun to read them!
    I have no bookmobile stories as I grew up in the city of Detroit and lived near the library. I loved going and loved reading. I took out stacks of books every week and plowed through them; I believe I just started with A and went right through the alphabet. The librarian didn’t believe that I was really reading all those books so quickly, and I remember being really hurt that she doubted me.
    My favorite book–how can I choose just one? I loved so many of them, and read them over and over. I grew up to become an English major! Okay, I’ll pick one: Calico Captive, by Elizabeth George Speare. I really loved historical fiction, and now my daughter writes it!
    I am about to edit her second book, which is what I’m reading, and I hope to finish that and read Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell before I start teaching in the fall.
    Thanks for the contest and the blog. Love reading it, even though it’s not historical.

  537. 1. As achild growing up in San Francisco, CA in the late 50’s/early 60’s, I had no knowledge of a Bookmobile.
    At age 10, I was sent to my NY grandparents, so I could be in my cousin’s wedding. My parents were to follow the very next month. However, their business deal fell through. It was eight LONG, lonely months before I saw my momma and daddy again.
    One of the things that helped me through that rough period was my friendship with Lisa. Lisa was a smart, fun, and caring friend. I lived in fear of the weekly visit by the music teacher because I could not read musical notes. (That was not a requirement in San Francisco schools.) Lisa tried valiantly to teach me how to read notes. In addition, Lisa had a mother who was a real “mom”, kind, sophisticated, and caring. Their friendship helped me through a difficult period of my life.
    Guess how I met Lisa? My “new” NY 5th grade teacher had assigned her to show me how to use the Bookmobile!
    2. My favorite childhood book was ‘Now We Are Six’, by A.A. Milne, presented to me on my sixth birthday by my mom. I so loved it when my mother would read me the poetry from that book. As I became a little older, I was able to read it for myself, and did so for hours. “Binker” (about a child’s imaginary friend) is one of the poems that I especially liked. The memory of my mom reading to me is an especially sweet one. Just nine years after she gave me that book, she was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis. By Christmas Eve, 1987, she was intubated, and placed on a respirator. She lives at home to this day on a ventillator. What I wouldn’t give to hear her voice just one more time…
    3. The book that I plan to read before the end of the summer is ‘Bring On the Empty Horses’, David Niven’s account of his years as an actor in Hollywood. I think that each chapter is about a different experience that he’d had.
    Thanks for listening.
    LoveDiane

  538. Wow! You have a huge number of comments to sift through! I hope you have a god cup of coffee handy…
    I’m afraid I don’t have a Bookmobile memory of my own, other than fondly remembering when the School Supplies Cart used to trundle down the hallway in elementary school, pushed by one of the librarians, so that we could buy a new pencil or exercise book or ruler, if need be. I used to love it, and must admit to still having a rather heavy affection for the Office Supplies Store. But that’s not a Bookmobile.
    What I do have for you though is the memory of my favourite chapter book as a kid. I was in grade 7, and had made it into the Enriched Programme in my high school (I suppose jr. high would be more what it was). I found a lot of it difficult as the programme wasn’t really suited to my learning style, and was rather accelerated than enriched. Then we started to read Cue for Treason in English class. I was rapt. I loved it. I ploughed through the book, reading each chapter as it was assigned, and itching to read further. Then one evening I did. I read one chapter beyond the one we had been assigned, and I loved it. I went to class the next day, and of course, let on that I had read ahead. I was chastised. I got in trouble for it. I left the enriched programme after one term, not sad to see the back end of that experience. I still love the book, and just finished re-reading it.
    As for what I’m reading now, it’s The Way The Crow Flies, by Anne-Marie MacDonald. Wonderful Canadian novelist and playwright. If you want to be haunted by a book I thoroughly recommend Fall On Your Knees, her first book. Amazing. I’ve just started this one, but I’m sure it’ll be wonderful too!

  539. Wow! You have a huge number of comments to sift through! I hope you have a good cup of coffee handy…
    I’m afraid I don’t have a Bookmobile memory of my own, other than fondly remembering when the School Supplies Cart used to trundle down the hallway in elementary school, pushed by one of the librarians, so that we could buy a new pencil or exercise book or ruler, if need be. I used to love it, and must admit to still having a rather heavy affection for the Office Supplies Store. But that’s not a Bookmobile.
    What I do have for you though is the memory of my favourite chapter book as a kid. I was in grade 7, and had made it into the Enriched Programme in my high school (I suppose jr. high would be more what it was). I found a lot of it difficult as the programme wasn’t really suited to my learning style, and was rather accelerated than enriched. Then we started to read Cue for Treason in English class. I was rapt. I loved it. I ploughed through the book, reading each chapter as it was assigned, and itching to read further. Then one evening I did. I read one chapter beyond the one we had been assigned, and I loved it. I went to class the next day, and of course, let on that I had read ahead. I was chastised. I got in trouble for it. I left the enriched programme after one term, not sad to see the back end of that experience. I still love the book, and just finished re-reading it.
    As for what I’m reading now, it’s The Way The Crow Flies, by Anne-Marie MacDonald. Wonderful Canadian novelist and playwright. If you want to be haunted by a book I thoroughly recommend Fall On Your Knees, her first book. Amazing. I’ve just started this one, but I’m sure it’ll be wonderful too!

  540. 1. No Bookmobile for me, we went to the real thing.
    2. I discovered The Little House in the Big Woods when I was 9 and was in HEAVEN. My daughter ain’t named Laura for nothing.
    3. The Space Between Us by Thrity Umrigar

  541. 1. I didn’t live in a bookmobile area as a kid.
    2. The title of a favorite chapter book from my childhood: The Secret Garden, by Frances Hodgson Burnett. I loved the idea a big house with lots of mysterious rooms, kind of like my grandparents’ attic. The garden in the book was everything I wanted it to be. It was the Ideal Garden of my mind’s eye.
    3. The title of a book I plan to read before the end of the summer of 2008: Bartleby the Scrivener, by Herman Melville. Perhaps this would be classed as a short story rather than a book. I wouldn’t know. I haven’t yet picked it up from the library’s reserved shelf.

  542. I never experienced the Bookmobile personally, but I have seen them and wished they could drive to my house every day.
    I can’t remember my favorite chapter book. But I did have a small obsession with reading when I was 5. In kindergarten, many of the other children had no desire to read. In order to remedy this epidemic of reading apathy, my teacher held a contest. Whoever read the most books at the end of the year would win a (surprise) prize. So I looked around the room at all of the play stations: house, building, pretend, etc. and realized that the reading station was the only one that offered a reward for spending time there. Being the smart girl I am, I started every playtime off at the book station. Slowly but surely I accumulated my book points. At the end of the school year I was awarded the prize….drumroll please….. and it was a book!
    To this day I love the Berenstain Bears and I take a few minutes to browse through the books in the bookstore to add just a few more book points!
    I will soon read Debbie MaComber’s Twenty Wishes, and I just finised Janet Evanovich’s Fearless Fourteen. It was incredibly funny – I found myself laughing out loud on numerous occasions.

  543. 1. No bookmobiles where I grew up, although I always thought it would be a great idea!
    2. My favorite book as a child was “A Wrinkle in Time,” and my daughter just read it and liked it.
    3. I want to finish the Reginald Hill mystery I’m reading and then get through Mark Twain’s “Innocents Abroad.”

  544. 1. A Bookmobile memory if you have one.
    2. The title of a favorite chapter book from your childhood or your child’s childhood.
    3. The title of a book you plan to read before the end of the summer of 2008.
    Alas, no bookmobiles spread literary largess from our Homewood, Alabama, library back in the forties and fifties. We lived beyond the end of the city bus line, so my mother walked with my older brother and me sometimes all the way to the library, which took about forty-five minutes of brisk walking, but in bad weather we waited for the bus at its last stop before returning to Homewood.
    All the books I could carry! Yes, I was allowed to check out unlimited numbers of books, but I had to carry them myself and those books got mighty heavy in my young arms. Often we did take the bus back home, walking with aching arms carrying too many books for those last few blocks beyond the end of the line.
    Now, whatever is a “chapter book”? That must be a book with chapters. Don’t all children’s fiction books have chapters? All I remember did have chapters. OZ books, BLACK STALLION books, NANCY DREW books, whatever, they all had chapters. This is puzzling.
    Two books I loved in my childhood, when I was in fifth and sixth grades, that I was never able to find for my own three daughters, were horse stories (both by the same author, whoever that was) called SILVER BIRCH and HARLEQUIN HULLABALOO. The author was English, I think, so perhaps those books didn’t hold up over the years for shelf space from the competition. But I looked and looked for them, unsuccessfully. Now I have a six-year-old granddaughter, and I would still love to find those books for her to enjoy in a few years.
    This summer’s reading? I have a stack of books by the recliner, and I’ll read quite a few books by summer’s end. This evening I have eight books checked out from the library. I read many health-related books, as my 2002 misery with breast cancer turned me into a health nut (as far as I know, I’m quite healthy now and almost finished with taking my five years of tamoxifen), and several of those health books are in my current reading stack. But for fiction just now I’m reading THE STORY OF EDGAR SAWTELLE and enjoying it very much. It’s quite a long book but it’s our book club (small neighborhood ladies’ group) selection so I know I’ll finish reading the whole thing.
    I’m sixty-four now and I no longer live in Alabama but near New Orleans, instead, and I usually drive to the library – or sometimes ride my bicycle for that six-mile round trip. This library does have a bookmobile, but I’ve never even set foot in it since coming and going from our subdivision takes us near the library anyway.
    Thanks for bringing back so many great library memories!

  545. 2. The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
    3. One Vacant Chair by Joe Coomer (love his books!)

  546. After thinking for a very long time, I finally remembered why I remember the book mobile, but don’t have any book mobile memories. They built an actual library in the very same parking lot where the book mobile used to come when I was around 5. I only vaguely remember going to the book mobile and things like how it smelled of old paper and how it always seemed dark inside because you’d just come in from the summer sun.
    I always loved books, but wasn’t much of a reader when I was a child. My older sister read enough for the both of us, and I was much more likely to be drawing or painting something. The first chapter book I remember reading on my own? Rebeca of Sunnybrooke Farm. But I also love E. B. White’s The Trumpet and the Swan.
    With a two year old and a two month old at home right now, I’m busy reading things about kids and childcare when I have the time. But I can absolutely, without a doubt, say that I will read One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish and Hand, Hand, Fingers, Thumb several times each before the summer is over.
    Thanks for the memories. I hadn’t thought about the book mobile in years. We even live walking distance to a library now. And hubby has a Schwinn mountain bike from before Schwinn was sold a few years back in a similar sparkly blue color, which is known as bass boat blue.

  547. Congrats on the bloggiversary!!!!!
    When I was 3 years old, the bookmobile visited us in Cultus Lake. I was allowed to pick my own book all by myself (I have 3 big sisters) and I usually got to look at their books too. My favourite book when I was a child was The Hound of the Baskervilles. One of the chapters was named XII. My son’s favourite book was “Captain Underpants and the Perilous Plot of Professor Poopypants” (he even has it in French. One of the chapters is “Are You There God, It’s Us, Fluffy and Cheeseball.”
    I plan to read Michael Ondaatje’s Governor General Award Winner, “Deviserado”.

  548. Congrats on the bloggiversary!!!!!
    When I was 3 years old, the bookmobile visited us in Cultus Lake. I was allowed to pick my own book all by myself (I have 3 big sisters) and I usually got to look at their books too. My favourite book when I was a child was The Hound of the Baskervilles. One of the chapters was named XII. My son’s favourite book was “Captain Underpants and the Perilous Plot of Professor Poopypants” (he even has it in French. One of the chapters is “Are You There God, It’s Us, Fluffy and Cheeseball.”
    I plan to read Michael Ondaatje’s Governor General Award Winner, “Deviserado”.

  549. 1. The bookmobile . . . One of the very best things about summers was the bookmobile and the summer reading program. Once a week, or once every other week, I would ride my forest green Sting-Ray down to bookmobile, which was parked at the local elementary school. I think we could check out only five or six books at a time and I remember agonizing over my selections because they were so precious and so . . . limited. Only six? How to decide? I was one of those kids who always seemed to be asking for an extra flyer because I wound up reading twice as many books as I needed to. If given a choice between the ice cream truck or the bookmobile, I’d have picked the bookmobile nearly every time.
    2. A favorite childhood chapter book . . . Harriet the Spy.

  550. 1. Sadly, there was no bookmobile where I grew up (suburban Cleveland, OH, Winona, MN, and suburban St.Paul, MN). However, there was, of course, always a free Public Library around. During the Summers, my Mom would drop me and my brother off at the Library while she ran errands. Now, my brother and I were VERY GOOD children that did not run away. Plus I was a totally geeky, nerdy, bookwormy type of girl…picture glasses (since the 5th grade), bad haircut courtesy of my mother (*gasp*, spend money on a haircut when I can do that just as well as the good people at Cost Cutters?), striped athletic knee socks and a pretty good sized potbelly. That would be me. My brother is two years younger than me, so he just didn’t know any better. Anyhoo, we would spend a couple of hours at the library every few days (free air conditioning–far be it for my uber-frugal mother to set the thermostat below 80 degrees!) and read and sometimes participate in activities. When I tell my friends about this, they look at me perplexidyly (shut up, it is so a word!) and just roll their eyes at me cuz I am still a bookworm!
    2. Favorite? So difficult…I would have to say, A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett or Skating Shoes by Noel Streitfeld. But I also loved the Little House Series, almost anything by Louisa May Alcott, and The Borrowers series by Mary Norton.
    3. If listening counts, The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follet. If not, the Sally Lockhart series by Phillip Pullman (LOVED the His Dark Materials series!).

  551. Kay,
    Our small-town Carnegie library was a couple of blocks from home, so I was a frequent flyer from age 4, when I became a card-carrying patron who loved Lois Lenski’s books. The childrens area was a cool, never bright basement with a vague musty-dusty odor. An old oak stereoscope with black-white-turned-yellow photos sat on a library table. I was nearly as fascinated with trying to figure out how the stereoscope worked as I was with endless possibilities offered by selecting library books.
    I don’t recall the title of my first chapter book, but I remember how much I loved reading and re-reading it. It was about four siblings who decided to pool their weekly allowances so that, in turn, one sibling would have a “big spending” event in any given month. The eldest girl splurged on having her nails done at a salon. At the time, I didn’t know a person went anywhere outside of the home to have her nails done, and I couldn’t wait to be old enough to have a similar adventure! I envied the sibling thing (only child here). Perhaps another reader knows the the book or its author?
    This summer I am reading: No Vulgar Hotel — The Desire and Pursuit of Venice, by Judith Martin (aka: Ms. Manners).
    It is wonderful to be able to enjoy a morning coffee in my bunny slippers while perusing Mason-Dixon blogland. Thanks for the opportunity to recall one of my earliest and enduring loves, the library.
    Luv,
    Ella

  552. Our bookmobile came twice a month and parked at the city park. I was so proud of my card, which had, if I remember correctly, an actual metal strip embedded in it. We only had bookmobile service for a couple of years because some ladies in our town saw the need and started a library. As a high school student, I typed some of the first cards for the card catalog. We now have a fine public library and are just finishing up a money drive for the endowment fund! My favorite chapter book was L.I. Wilder’s The Long Winter, one of the Little House books and Tom Sawyer. I plan to read All the Pretty Horses before the summer is over.

  553. Our bookmobile came twice a month and parked at the city park. I was so proud of my card, which had, if I remember correctly, an actual metal strip embedded in it. We only had bookmobile service for a couple of years because some ladies in our town saw the need and started a library. As a high school student, I typed some of the first cards for the card catalog. We now have a fine public library and are just finishing up a money drive for the endowment fund! My favorite chapter book was L.I. Wilder’s The Long Winter, one of the Little House books and Tom Sawyer. I plan to read All the Pretty Horses before the summer is over.

  554. I wanted a Bookmobile, but we didn’t have one on my side of town. But, my favorite place in the world was the Carnegie Library downtown. It had metal staircases that wound in and around the entire building…dark, cool and quiet, but the smell was the best part. The downtown library closed in lieu of the new building (progress!), which didn’t have the same smell or grandeur. There, I found Waterbabies, The Secret Garden and Encyclopedia Brown. I would sneak downstairs to the Adult Fiction, and wander the stacks until my neck hurt from turning my head sideways to look at titles.
    Thanks for the opportunity to share!

  555. I wanted a Bookmobile, but we didn’t have one on my side of town. But, my favorite place in the world was the Carnegie Library downtown. It had metal staircases that wound in and around the entire building…dark, cool and quiet, but the smell was the best part. The downtown library closed in lieu of the new building (progress!), which didn’t have the same smell or grandeur. There, I found Waterbabies, The Secret Garden and Encyclopedia Brown. I would sneak downstairs to the Adult Fiction, and wander the stacks until my neck hurt from turning my head sideways to look at titles.
    Thanks for the opportunity to share!

  556. Sadly, I never got to experience the Bookmobile. However, I spent many, many hours reading inside when I should have been outside, at least according to the grown ups in my life! So, for #2, one of my favorites was A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle, and for #3, I WILL finish Pillars of the Earth this summer…
    Michelle

  557. I can’t tell you how may times I blubbered my way thru “Stella Dallas”. We didn’t have access to a Book Mobile, I found Stella in amongst my mom’s little library of books. I still have that book, I figured no one in our family loved it as much as me.

  558. 1. A Bookmobile memory if you have one.
    Don’t have one. I grew up in India and we didn’t have bookmobiles, even in New Delhi or Bangalore. I remember going to a private library down the street- it was just a shack, really- and borrowing books for a few rupees in fees. Ah, memories.
    2. The title of a favorite chapter book from your childhood or your child’s childhood.
    I don’t think many kids here in the US read them but I used to love the books of British author Enid Blyton. She was prolific! There were the Secret Seven series, the Famous Five series, the Five Find-Outers, the boarding school books…really just hundreds of books. They were fun to read and I’d spend hours figuring out the strange things the characters ate (tongue! kippers!) and why their bruises would change color from day to day when mine stubbornly stayed the same. :)
    3. The title of a book you plan to read before the end of the summer of 2008.
    I’d like to read “Unaccustomed Earth” by Jhumpa Lahiri. I’ve enjoyed her previous novel (The Namesake) and short stories (Interpreter of Maladies).

  559. Growing up in the late ’60s and early ’70s(cuz it takes a long time to grow up…), I *lived* at the local library. We had a summer reading club and got stamps for every book we read. We got some kind of certificate for reading 10 or more books, like Kay used to get.
    Fast forward many years to the late ’80s and I was a new mom with two babies and couldn’t even think to try to get to the library with them in tow. The bookmobile pulled into the parking lot of the elementary school beside my house and I popped in to get books. Knitting books. The librarian rotated the selection and for many months, that was my sanity saver – getting new – to me – books from the bookmobile.
    As for my girlhood summer reading, I loved anything “Anne of Green Gables” by Lucy M. Montgomery, since Anne was a chatty sort (so was/am I), and she had such a way with words.
    As for this year’s summer reading, “The Way of the Pilgrim”, a Russian spiritual classic. A bit esoteric for summer reading, but it’s an enjoyable read. I’d love to read some fiction, but that would necessitate ditching the kids who are home with me for summer holidays, and that wouldn’t be nice :)
    PS Today’s my birthday, so I’d love to win a book :)

  560. PS again – Thanks for the memories. I got a pink banana seat bike for my twelfth birthday and then had a huge growth spurt and was such a klutz I couldn’t ride it!

  561. 1. No bookmobile, but my mom took me to the library every week… in our old corvair, then in the 69 cadillac, later in the pontiac station wagon, then in the “chevette” until I could finally drive myself. So mom was my bookmobile through the 70’s. And once in blue moon, she would drive us over to “The” Carnegie (the huge Carnegie library branch near the University of Pittsburgh campus). I have vivid memories of her reading EST books and “I’m OK, You’re OK” while I plowed through all the Nancy Drews. We’re both still readers, and email recommendations to each other all the time. (Amazon is my current favorite bookmobile)
    2. Over the years I loved the Boxcar Children, Nancy Drew, Robin Kane, and especially recall The Endless Steppe about a girl exiled in Siberia (a book I got through a Scholastic order form circa 1974 and kept for years and years, but somehow no longer have). Then there was Are You There God, It’s me Margaret.
    3. After a Thousand Splendid Suns and Kite Runner, I went light with When You Are Engulfed in Flames. Next up is Divisadero and I’m certain I will finish it by September.
    Thanks for the great blog! Always makes me laugh.

  562. Bookmobiles were the best! We didn’t have a TV when I was a kid and I really don’t think I missed much: hey, I had books! Lots of wonderful, adventurous books that I could get lost in. I remember wanting the bookmobile to come every day but the schedule was weekly. I always had my books read with time to spare so had to find something else to read and in our house that wasn’t hard. I loved Zane Grey and anything by Mary O’Hara as a kid. My current summer book is a re-reading of most of Jane Austen, starting with Pride and Prejudice.

  563. I only have one memory of a bookmobile…it was a converted greyhound bus that was sitting in the parking lot of the library…I only went in it once when it came to my school. Found the greatest book there though…Iron Dragon’s Daughter…have never seen it anywhere else…I should google it.
    Also: My favorite book as a child was Margaret Hendry’s “Quest for a Maid,” which I read 16 times the first year I owned it. (I stopped counting after that…)I still have my original paperback copy, although now the front cover is affixed to itself with blue electrical tape. My dad bought me a signed first edition for my birthday a couple years back, but I just can’t discard the original!
    And, this summer I am going to finally finish reading the Bernard Cornwell Sharpe Series…only 3 to go!

  564. I loved the bookmobile but it didn’t come often enough. I always had my books read within 3 or 4 days and then had to wait FOREVER! I loved anything by Mary O’Hara and Zane Grey. My mother belonged to a book club so we had lots of other books to read between Bookmobile visits. Our bookmobile was a converted school bus; it was wonderful!
    My summer reading this year is most of the collected works of Jane Austen. I’m almost through Pride and Prejudice (for the 3rd or 4th time) and it still amazes me!

  565. I loved the school bookmobile! My memory is of the year when I won the prize for creating a poster for the bookmobile. I got a gift certificate to spend in the bookmobile and was so thrilled. I bragged about that for years!
    My favorite children’s books of all time are the magic books by Edward Eager. I got them out of the library so many times I must have read them each 10 times. I have my own copies today and recommend them to every kid I know. Favorite titles are Knight’s Castle and Half Magic. Enjoy your summer reading!

  566. 1. I remember going on the bookmobile as a kid, but I lived so many different places that I can’t remember where it was! However, the Pikes Peak Library District (where I live now) has 2 (3?) bookmobiles so if y’all come out here for a book signing, I can take you on the bookmobile! (I have several librarian friends- and they’re knitters!) As a bonus, I’ll let you ride my daughter’s circa ’84 pink metallic Schwinn Stingray bike. The banana seat is currently a mostly padless white with pink stars and held together with duct tape. A trip to the fabric store for new padding and cool oilcloth or vinyl to recover the seat is planned.(Riding thru sprinklers and occasionally leaving it out in the rain makes a knitted denim seat impractical. Yes, I considered it. Denim with pink metallic- how cool would that be?)
    2. Voracious inhaler of books as a child, but I really loved The Bobbsey Twins, The Five Little Peppers, and the Saturdays. (And the Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew, Ellery Queen, The Boxcar Children….)
    3. My summer book was The Yiddish Policeman’s Union but I just finished it (I needed my Yiddish-English dictionary!) so I’ll go back to the pile of paperback mysteries and trashy romances til my husband is finished with Bleeding Kansas and then I’ll start that.
    4. I really love that photo of Carrie. It reminds me of the famous Nat’l Geographic photo of the Afghan girl with the incredible green eyes. Rushing to finish my MDKay A4A shawl so I can take a photo of one (or all 4) of my girls in the Carrie pose. (Hmmm- 2 of mine even have green eyes.)

  567. 1. I remember our bookmobile fondly, though I never had to go to it, it came to our school, and that is where I got my first library card. But my best bookmobile memory is a totally random one. In library (in the 80s) we watched these movies that were supposed to help you learn all kinds of things like the dewy decimal system. They were set in the future when people who didn’t think learning or reading was important were taking over the world (I was eight so my memory might be a bit fuzzy on why these neanderthal type people were taking over). Anyway kids stumble upon a bookmobile and basically save the world… I think. See the school year ended and we never got to the last film, and I have always wondered what the heck happened! So if anyone out there is reading this and knows what I am talking about help me out!
    2. Maida’s Little House. Set in the 20s (written in the 20s I think) about a girl who had it all, except friends. Then she got some and they all went to spend the summer in this magical house on a great old estate.
    3. Happiest Baby on the Block. I’m looking to be prepared.
    p.s. I AM SO EXCITED FOR YOUR NEXT BOOOK!

  568. 1. I don’t have memories of bookmobiles – I think we were in a place that was too rural for that. But I always loved the idea of a van filled with books.
    2. My all time favourites are Charlotte’s Web and From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler. In fact, I still re-read them frequently…and not always to my own children.
    3. The list is long! Here are two currently hanging around the house: Fury by Salaman Rushdie and Sailing Home by Norman Fischer.
    Thanks for asking…

  569. My bookmobile came to my rural Indiana childhood home from about 1965 – 1975 and it parked, mama, in our DRIVEWAY — or what was the gravel turnoff from the state road that lead to our house. I’m puttin’ on airs by calling it a driveway. It smelled of plywood. Sweet, honey, bookish plywood with perhaps just a hint of motor oil running a little too hot. It was painted beige outside. It came from Michigan, because we were just across the state line. It loaded up its books from where the real library was — the old grange hall in the middle of a cornfield in Cassopolis, Michigan.
    Lest you think this is getting too Norman Rockwell here’s a non bookmobile memory to take the edge off: I remember being in a huge pre-puberty angsty fit (must of been too early for The Match Game to take my mind off it) one boring summer vacation and I wished I was the type to smoke cigarettes. I went out to the garden, grabbed a green pepper and tried to smoke that. This was less harsh on my throat than when I thought you could just roll up a piece of paper and light that if you didn’t have any tobaccy.
    But, I digress.
    Favorite chapter book, so favorite that my mom went out and BOUGHT me not just one copy but TWO as I left one out on the picnic table in the rain: CHARLOTTE’s WEB — and my mom did not buy books.
    The main books I remember from the Bookmobile — BOXCAR CHILDREN — not that candyass mystery series now, which is a little too Scooby-Doo for me (let me guess, the evil guy is manager of the Inn in a disguise!). No, BOXCAR CHILDREN in that lone boxcar in the lone woods. No parents. What do you suppose they tried to smoke?
    I’m going to read me some Willa Cather before school starts. Don’t know a title as I never read one before. But I’m doing it, for criminy dutch!
    Andraya Dolbee
    andrayadolbee@comcast.net

  570. Yesterday I went to TWO courthouses for a hearing that was cancelled and got all weepy on a poor clerk of courts. Considerably rumpled in spirit ma’am. Your pictures made it better.
    1) My mom taught me to read with Dick and Jane and I could also write my name at 2 years — but when she applied for a jr library card at the bookmobile, they said I had to be able to SIGN my name. We went home and practiced in cursive for two weeks and the next visit I finally got my card right after my 3rd birthday! I remember them egging me on as I wrote.
    1.1) Once I wrote BM on the calendar every other Wednesday, and my mother said she thought I was planning out my bowel movements (bookmobile nights.)
    2) I still remember my mom’s favorite picture book: The Day Jimmy’s Boa Constrictor Ate the Wash. If you don’t know it, the last page is the boa’s new family at the field-trip farm, and the wife is knitting a loooong sweater for the boa as the cat purrs on. Me? I’m still on a love affair with Young Adult Fiction.
    2.1) Any one else remember their first encounter with a Complete Set of Nancy Drew? Valhalla!
    3) I had to re-read it last night: my scrabbly 1956 copy of Enid Johnson’s Nancy Runs the Bookmobile. A cross between Nancy Drew and Helen Keller, Nan fends of the worldly radio star and the moody holocaust victim because she loves all-American TAD Rivers. Yes, Tad. All while driving the bookmobile and making all of Blair County love books: farmers, cripples, and all.

  571. Where I grew up I never saw a bookmobile, though my elementary school would give you a star sticker for every book you read and after a certain number of stars you got a free personal sized pizza from
    Pizza Hut. We had a lot of pizza!
    I have a very special childhood book memory. In second grade I was moving from MA to CT. My teacher and I adored each other and the day I moved she came to my aunt’s house and gave me a beautiful copy of Little Women with gorgeous illustrations. I had never owned anything so special. Mrs. Burbank wrote a beautiful inscription about me (that still brings tears to my mother’s eyes this day) and now we are going to get the same edition for my 8 year old niece.
    My life wasn’t very different from those girls who had to work hard, sacrifice and give up on material things and depend on the love of one of another. I am also the second of 4 girls and was quite a tomboy like Jo!
    The confidence that woman put in me, to read a huge novel like that has always been one of those character defining moments and is something I think about when struggles start to seem overwhelming and I need a bit of self confidence to charge ahead.
    I have a 3 year old and a 5-day old so the book I plan to finish this summer will most likely be the Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle. I could manage a few Dr. Seuss. If I do get any adult reading in I will finish the last 4 chapters of Shear Spirit that I got 2 weeks ago at Gale’s book signing.

  572. On Long Island, where I grew up, the bookmobile was more of a Scholastic buy-some-books kind of thing. We did get a brand spanking new library to replace the old one when I was a kid and it was recently expanded again. My favorite library memory is from my daughter – pajama time at the Bayside NY library. 7pm in the summer for the under five set, pj’s and the librarian reads one or two books.
    My favorite books as a kid:
    My Father’s Dragon and Twenty One Balloons
    My daughter’s : Because of Winn Dixie.
    I’d like to re-read anything by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, but now I think I have to read Abigail Thomas.

  573. Unfortunately, where I grew up there wasn’t a bookmobile.
    As for my favorite book when I was a little girl? I must say, I loved Witches by Roald Dahl. He had such an amazing imagination!
    I have heard so many great things about “Water for Elephants” by Sara Gruen, so I think I’ll have to read that before summer ends!

  574. We did not have book mobiles in the town I lived in, but at school we had R.I.F. Day. I remember my first RIF day vividly. It was when I was in 4th grade. There was no warning, no announcement. The teacher just got us all lined up, marched us to the long hallway outside the gym and all up and down the hall were tables of books upon books. We were told by the lady there that we may choose 5 books. To KEEP, for FREE. I was in HEAVEN. We only had 1/2 hour to choose our books, but several of the books I chose that day I still have and read and have impacted my life. Mrs Frisby and the Rats of Nimh was a favorite, my very first birding field guide (I am now an avid bird watcher) and the Little House on the Prairie series by Laura Ingalls Wilder. On The Banks of Plum Creek is one of my favorites from the series. As a girl I was awed by the chapter “The Glittering Cloud” when the grasshopper plague descended upon the prairie.I love and still read those books. I have gone through 2 sets of them. (btw, I have a few of her knitting patterns she used!)
    This summer I plan on reading Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke

  575. The town I grew up in didn’t have a bookmobile, but I felt pangs of jealousy reading about the bookmobile in Adriana Trigiani’s Big Stone Gap novels.
    Favorite chapter book as a kid: The Secret Garden.
    Summer reading: Love the One You’re With by Emily Griffin.

  576. For Happy Dodson, who was looking for Harlequin Hullabaloo, go here:
    http://www.alibris.com/booksearch?title=Harlequin+Hullabaloo
    I loved that book too …

  577. No bookmobile in my life – but the summer reading program at the Speedway Lib. is still a smiling memory for me.
    I have a few good book memories as a kid — but I think “Island of the Blue Dolphins” by O’Dell taught me that I could cry and still love a book.
    I am going to finish “Loving Frank” by Horan this summer — then tell my bookclub about it when we meet up again in September.

  578. Only the library for me, where I devoured everything I could get my hands on: Nancy Drew, Cherry Ames, all of those Walter Farley horse books. My daughter’s favorites: who wouldn’t end up being a history major after an early diet Terry Deary’s wonderful, hilarious yet educational, Horrible History books: Rotten Romans, Groovy Greeks, Terrible Tudors, Slimy Stuarts. Back then I had to order them from Blackwell’s, but you more modern moms should run to Amazon UK to get them. My daughter still remembers more English history than any American child I know!

  579. I have never seen a bookmobile in person, but I sure love to read. One of my favorite childhood books was The Hero and the Crown by Robin McKinley. I understood a lot more of it when I looked it up as adult, though. This summer, I plan to read Gridlinked by Neal Asher.

  580. The bookmobile! Oh how I loved that big ol’ bus…ours came and parked in the middle school parking lot every two weeks. I would rush in and begin scouring the shelves for something new – frequently the workers would have something saved for me. (I was a regular, you understand!) My mom usually had to drag me out, still pleading for “Just 5 more minutes, Mom?” My favorite books back then were Walter Farley’s “Black Stallion” series, and the Chincoteague horse books. Yes, I was a horse-crazy preteen girl. What great memories this post brought back. Thank you!

  581. Thank you for bringing back memories of pixie cuts and seersucker shorts sets! It’s hard to single out a favorite childhood book, but a much-loved one was Alice in Wonderland. As for now, as soon as I finish Founding Brothers, by Joseph Ellis, I’ll be diving into Lords and Ladies, by the ever-inventive, strange, and funny Terry Pratchett.

  582. We did not have a bookmobile, but we walked to the next town to visit the library on a regular basis, as my mother was a great reader.
    One of my favorite chapter books was The Princess and the Goblin by George McDonald. By the end of this summer, I plan to read The Other Side of the Sun by Madeline L’Engle. I like her a lot and this is a book that is being read by one of the book groups on Ravelry.
    I love the pictures of the bookmobile!

  583. We didn’t have a bookmobile when I was young, probably because a) it was the 80s, and b) I was lucky enough to live four blocks from a rather nice public library. Looking at the pictures though, I’m a bit jealous of the bookmobile. I loved, loved, LOVED Trixie Belden books growing up –– they were the first chapters books I read on my own, and I still have them all. My favorite was the Mystery in New York. By the end of the summer I’m planning to read The Lace Reader, by Brunonia Barry.

  584. 1. Alas, Omro, Wisconsin had no bookmobile. We were lucky to have a one room library open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday afternoons.
    2. The Bobbsey Twins in the original 69 cent Whitman-peel-if-you-look-at-it binding. The Drama! The Compassion! The Human Condition!
    3. Reread The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell.

  585. #1. It was a happy day when I could ride my “Pink Lady’ (Schwinn..) to the Bookmobile parking spot.
    I was afraid I would never remember the name of the books I loved to answer question #2 and out of the blue came the name Janet Lambert…author of the Penny Parish series, but then there was Sue Barton, Student nurse and the series by Maud Hart Lovelace…and more. I loved them all. In the early sixties, we read what the girls read in the 50’s!(http://www.imagecascade.com/MM069.ASP?pageno=21)
    #3. On my list to complete this summer is Like Water for Chocolate and Eat, Pray, Love.
    Thanks for the opportunity to take a trip down Memory Lane. I can’t even imagine how these books would “play” today!

  586. So. My favorite book is The Saturdays – and the other four Melendy books. The backstory? ALL I could remember about the book for years was the name of the oldest boy, Rush. And that the book was thick, with a red leather-ish cover. All the years my daughter, now 25, was growing up, whenever we went to a used book store I would look for, yep, a thick red book. Never found it. Fast forward to a year ago when a friend happened to tell me of a new google book search feature which enabled me to type – yep – Rush. And. I. Found. The. Title. I wept. Honest. Went to a used book site, bought one. With a red cover. For $60. Read it again, loved it again. Wept.

  587. Great idea for a contest! Perhaps that’s because I loved the bookmobile. It was a cozier version of the library (which I adored), and guaranteed that I would only see the nice librarians, never the grumpy one at the main library who thought I was taking out too many books.
    See, the couple that ran the bookmobile were good friends of my parents, and were always delighted to see me. To make things even better, the bookmobile parked right in front of my house!
    I loved seeing Mr. and Mrs. Rogne, and stopped in every week to poke through the books. I was an advanced reader at 10 or 11, so the Rognes never minded if I abandoned the children’s section and checked out adult books.
    I remember checking out a paperback once, from the adult section, that seemed like it might contain a good story–I wish I could remember the title, but I can’t. When I was maybe halfway through the book (which was only so-so at best), I was shocked to see a certain word in it. A certain word which meant a feature of male anatomy which little girls were not supposed to know about! I was fascinated and horrified–and worst of all, positive that when I returned the book, Mrs. Rogne was going to know what I had done.
    The next week, I carefully sandwiched the hot potato in the center of a stack of other books, and quietly handed the stack to Mrs. Rogne, praying she wouldn’t notice. She smiled and chatted with me and went through the return process. I didn’t stay to check out anything else; I launched out of there and back into the house as fast as I could, certain that she’d known I had read a dirty book.
    In reality, she probably had no idea. The book was obvious junk (even as a child I realized it as soon as I started reading it), and since she wasn’t the sort who read junk herself, she likely had no idea.
    But part of me still sometimes wonders if she knew.

  588. p.s. Forgot the second part!
    I absolutely loved the Betsy-Tacy series. Betsy-Tacy and Tib would be one title.
    I’m planning to read Jasper Fforde’s The Eyre Affair before the summer is over.

  589. I never had to use a bookmobile but remember hearing about them when I was young. We were always near a library and my parents would buy us books all the time. Except for pop-up books. I remember the book faire in first grade. I wanted a pop-up book so bad, but Mom said no, they weren’t serious enough. I never got over it. I think your next book should have a pop-up page.
    My favorite book was The Secret Garden, given to me by my best friend’s mother for my birthday. Still my favorite.
    I am half way through The Call of the Wild, which I picked up at the library book store. I never read it in school, and for 50 cents, why not?

  590. Not a bookmobile (never had them around), but definitely a reading-library memory. My best friend and I (grade 4) always had a bit of an unspoken contest going on. She was smarter than I, but I’ve only been willing to say that since, oh, around 10 years out of high school (and never to her!). One late spring/early summer day, school not yet out, we walked from school to the library, about a mile away. We were going there for a showing of “Escape from Witch Mountain,” but we’d have to hang out at the library until her mother could pick us up (an hour or so after the movie).
    By the time her mother got to the library, each of us had accumulated about 3 paper grocery bags worth of books to check out. Of course, the librarians were skeptical…you’ll never read all of those, they said, peering over the counter at us. But bless her heart, my friend’s mother vouched for both of us, explaining that we would indeed read them all, and they’d be returned well before the due date.
    And she was right. We read every one of those books in the three brown grocery bags, and they were back before the deadline. No certificates for us, though…it wasn’t officially summer.
    Just in case you’re holding fast to the “Bookmobile” part, here are answers to 2 & 3:
    2. Anne of Green Gables
    3. The Kommandant’s Girl by Pam Jenoff

  591. Ah, one of my favorite chapter books would be “The Dark is Rising” by Susan Howard (or any in that series.
    I’m in the opening stages of “A Short History of Nearly Everything” by Bill Bryson.
    No bookmobile memories, but I was also one of those children who would tell (lie to) her parents at bedtime, “but I just need to finish this chapter!” They’d catch me forty pages later. . .

  592. We had a small, but abundantly full library in my tiny Indiana hometown and I’ll always remember the summer I discovered the “classics” section on the second floor. Pride and Predjudice was my first Jane Austen novel and I can almost reproduce the sights and smells of going in to check out several Austens or Brontes and then heading home to “lay out” in the sun and work on my tan while reading about a time when the ladies would have been doing all they could to avoid even a hint of outdoor exposure.
    I was in high school by the time I found the Victorian writers, but my favorite books as a child were the Lad: A Dog series by Albert Payson Terhune.
    I’m hoping to finish Ken Follet’s Pillars of the Earth by summer’s end.

  593. We had a small, but abundantly full library in my tiny Indiana hometown. I still remember the summer I discovered the “classics” section on the second floor. I can just about reproduce the sights and smells in my mind as I went in to check out several Austen’s or Brontes and then headed home to “lay out” in the sun and work on my tan. It was ironic that I was burning myself to a crisp in the name of my vanity while reading about a time when ladies weren’t considered very genteel if they looked as though they had been exposed to the sunlight.
    I was in high school by the time I discovered the Victorian classics, but my favorite childhood books were the Lad: A Dog series by Albert Payson Terhune.
    I hope to finish Ken Follet’s Pillars of the Earth by summer’s end.

  594. We had a small, but abundantly full library in my tiny Indiana hometown. I still remember the summer I discovered the “classics” section on the second floor. I can just about reproduce the sights and smells in my mind as I went in to check out several Austen’s or Brontes and then headed home to “lay out” in the sun and work on my tan. It was ironic that I was burning myself to a crisp in the name of my vanity while reading about a time when ladies weren’t considered very genteel if they looked as though they had been exposed to the sunlight.
    I was in high school by the time I discovered the Victorian classics, but my favorite childhood books were the Lad: A Dog series by Albert Payson Terhune.
    I hope to finish Ken Follet’s Pillars of the Earth by summer’s end.

  595. It is the essential nature of Bookmobiles to be retro – by the time I was at school in the 1980s our Mobile Library (the Brits are so unimaginative!) was of a ripe 70s vintage. It did, however, have an upstairs – very cool!
    One of my favouite childhood books was called ‘Ferdinand the Bull’ about a bull in Spain who doesn’t want to bull fight, he just wants to ‘sit and smell the flowers’ – a pacifist bull, a good lesson for any era! (Incidentally, I think the book is actually 50s or earlier and I have seen a version in Latin – one for the high-brow hippie!)
    I plan to get through ‘The Bostonians’ this summer – to be honest, I’d rather be smelling the flowers, but I have to teach it to undergrads soon, so I really need to have actually read it. Bummer.

  596. Oh this is AWFUL….something is wrong with my dumb computer and now I suppose it looks like I have tried to enter the contest 3 times….I just kept hitting buttons when it looked like it wasn’t posting…..sooooooo sorry!!!!

  597. 1) In the 4th grade, the Bookmobile ladies told me I’d picked out books that were too grown up for me and made me put them back. I was infuriated! At the time I was reading at an 8th grade level, and my mom pretty much let me read whatever I wanted from her vast bookshelves. I have a few childhood memories of knowing absolutely that the adult I was dealing with was being stupid. This is one of them.
    2) I read Sideways Stories from Wayside School over and over and over and over.
    3) I’m halfway through Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver. After that I’m going to read Castle Dor by Daphne Du Maurier.

  598. Bruno is riding David’s metallic red Stingray this summer.
    The Moomin books by Tove Jansson were, are, and ever shall be the world’s greatest children’s literature.
    I’m reading Gilgamesh.
    I know I’m disqualified because of my employee status, but I had to chirp up.

  599. 1) No Bookmobile growing up, unfortunately. We went to the library every month, and all of the librarians knew me because of the stacks of books that I took with me. Our library even had paintings that you could check out and put on your wall at home for a month at a time.
    2) One of my favorites was Bridge to Terabithia. I keep revisiting it, but I’m afraid to see the movie.
    3) I hope to finish Reading Lolita in Tehran. It’s fascinating.

  600. I’ll bite! We didn’t have a bookmobile, but one of my most cherished childhood books was passed down to me by a babysitter. It was called Magic Elizabeth, by Norma Kassirer. I would probably snap it right up again today if I found it in a used bookshop! As for what I’d like to finish this summer, I’ve been working on The Worst Journey in the World, an account of Scott’s final (and very tragic) expedition to Antarctica. Not exactly beach fare, but extremely gripping stuff.

  601. Favorite book from childhood: So hard to pick just one, but I LOVED Forever by Judy Blume.
    Book to read this summer: I have read a number of children’s books, but want to read some grown up books too (as a children’s librarian, you are always reading children’s books). I am going to try my best to read Water for Elephants.
    Happy 5th Ladies!

  602. Dear Kay and Ann,
    Alas, no bookmobile in my childhood; however there was a beautiful, old library. It had an antique clock on the wall behind the counter that ticked so loudly. I was totally captivated by it.(This library is Queen Anne artichitecture and chocked full of antiques. It is truly a jewel in this little river town). When I got my library card, I felt very special and grown up.
    I do have a childhood memory of my mother redeeming stamps that she would get when purchasing groceries at our local grocery store. There was a store adjacent to the grocery store that held merchandise for redemption of these books of stamps. She got dishes, glasses, etc., and on one occasion, she got a set of books for me. Some of the titles were Pinocchio, Aladdin, Call of the Wild, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. She would read to me from my favorite, Pinocchio.
    This summer, I am going to finish reading Wicked. I started it in the fall before we saw the play. It got stuck in the bottom of my knitting bag (go figure), and until recently, I had completely forgotten about it.
    Happy Fifth Blogiversary and thanks for a wonderful blog!

  603. I have been reading more lately (knitting had gotten the best of me, but I’m trying to split my time more evenly), and one I plan to read before the year is out…hmmmm…”19 Minutes” by Jodi Picoult. My mom lent it to me. But I have a huge list of “to reads”.
    A fave from my childhood that I recently read to my son is “The Trumpet of the Swan”. LOVE IT. And we’re slowly making our way through a bunch of Beverly Cleary books, especially the ones with Henry Huggins and Ribsy (currently “Henry and the Paper Route”).
    Excited, as are many, for the new MDK!! Congrats and can’t wait!

  604. 1. We had an actual library, a one room storefront.
    2. Anne of Green Gables
    3. Ann Patchett’s “Patron Saint of Liars”

  605. I don’t have any BookMobile memories but I did oh so love the Book Fair!
    Can I have two favorite chapter books from childhood? They are, of course, both Newbery Medal winners. . . I think I had a librarian at some point that really pushed the Newbery books. Anyway, Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH and Island of the Blue Dolphins.
    And you didn’t ask but I will tell you that I love love Cynthia Voigt – any of her books – but especially Izzy, Willy Nilly. Oh the tragedy! Excellent Stuff.
    As for what I plan to read this summer, I’ve just recently started Borderland: A Journey Through the History of Ukraine. I’m going to the Ukraine in September and so I’m doing a little background reading. Also, just for the sheer pleasure of it, I am planning to read a novel by Elizabeth Berg (who is always a fabulous, enjoyable read) called The Art of Mending. I’ve had it on my book shelf for about a year and haven’t gotten around to reading it. It is high time.

  606. The bookmobile came to our elementary school about once a month. I have memories of loving to visit it and wishing it could be all mine. I have always loved books and libraries. The smell, the hushed quiet and knowledge and wonder all around!
    The first chapter book I remember is the Bobsey Twins, I think it was one where they went to the beach.
    The next book on deck for me this summer is Middlesex by Jeffery Eugenides.

  607. I grew up on a little island in Southeast Alaska where there was no bookmobile. I take my children to it now that I live in a place that has one because I think it is the coolest thing ever. Instead of at the bookmobile, I spent my summers fishing for salmon on my dad’s commercial fishing boat. I would steal moments in between work to read and remember reading the whole Little House series in less than a month the summer before I entered fifth grade and getting in trouble for it repeatedly. My dad would say, “Put down that G%& da^# book and get out on deck and work!” Now I teach fifth grade and always start the year by reading _Little House on the Prairie_ aloud. It is sad to me that almost none of my students (in 11 years) have ever read it. I think it ought to be illegal to turn 18 without having read those books.
    This summer I plan to read _A Plague of Doves_ by Louise Erdrich although I am a little afraid of it–it was chosen by my book club but looks very dark.
    -Lara

  608. No bookmobiles in Argentina during my childhood… (at least that I knew of!)
    My favorite books when I was a child: Little Women and Alice in Wonderland.
    One that I plan to read in the next couple of months: A Reading Diary, by Alberto Manguel.
    Congrats on a wonderful blog!
    Andrea

  609. (Not entering again but just saying:)
    Holy bookbinding, Batman! 611 Comments!!!

  610. Just over the wire, hope it still counts.
    1. No bookmobile. Large old libary in 1930’s school building with tall wooden shelves. Loved the place.
    2. The Secret Garden, Frances Hodgsen Burnett. When I couldn’t find a new book to check out, I re-read this one, over and over.
    3. You’ve sent me into nostalgia mode — I will re-read several of the early Mary Stewart novels: The Ivy Tree, The Moonspinners, Nine Coaches Waiting, Wildfire at Midnight.

  611. My favorite memory about the bookmobile is that we didn’t have one for very long. When it came to town, in the early ’60s, some of the women’s clubs saw the need for our own public library and started one. The bookmobile lasted only a couple of years here, but our library is still growing and going strong. It is of exceptional quality for such a small town, and although the salaries and utilities and so forth are provided from tax dollars, the building and the extras are still provided by members of the community. In fact, we’re just finishing up a campaign to establish an endowment. But this began when people saw the interest in the bookmobile.
    My favorite chapter books were Tom Sawyer, Little Women, and the Laura Ingalls Wilder books, in particular The Long Winter.
    I plan to read All the Pretty Horses.

  612. Sadly, no bookmoblie memory, because the library itself was no larger than a bookmoblie. Bridgeport, NY could have made their library mobile by adding wheels. My favorite book, hands down is Charlotte’s Web. It was amazing. As for books I plan to finish…this is (once again) the summer of historical/romance fiction, so I’m just hoping to finish SOMETHING! 10 books, Ha! Those wonderous days of blissful summer reading are gone, gone, gone. If only Diana Gabaldon would publish that 7th book in the Outlander series. Oh, well.

  613. Our bookmobile in Romulus, NY in 1985 had shaggy olive green carpeting that covered the floor and the bench-like steps. I remember checking out books with a record and listening to them with my twin sister.
    One of my favorite chapter books was Anne of Green Gables, and I remember my delight upon finishing it and learning that there were many more books in the series!

  614. I’m not sure which time zone you’re in, so this may be too late, but here goes:
    My favorite kids books (and yes, I read them when I was an adult) include The Star Beast, Red Planet, Podkayne of Mars, The Rolling Stones, all by Robert Heinlein.
    More recently, Harry Potter (of course), the Magyk series, and The Golden Compass Series.

  615. I’m not sure which time zone you’re in, so this may be too late, but here goes:
    My favorite kids books (and yes, I read them when I was an adult) include The Star Beast, Red Planet, Podkayne of Mars, The Rolling Stones, all by Robert Heinlein.
    More recently, Harry Potter (of course), the Magyk series, and The Golden Compass Series.

  616. I’m not sure which time zone you’re in, so this may be too late, but here goes:
    My favorite kids books (and yes, I read them when I was an adult) include The Star Beast, Red Planet, Podkayne of Mars, The Rolling Stones, all by Robert Heinlein.
    More recently, Harry Potter (of course), the Magyk series, and The Golden Compass Series.

  617. 1. well, i don’t have a book mobile story…i wish i did…that would have been awewome!
    2. the first chapter books i remember reading were the Amelia Bedelia books by Peggy Parish. then later i remember reading the Baby-Sitter’s Club series and some of the Sweet Valley High books.
    3. i have been reading up a storm already this summer. i have already read the whole Yada Yada Prayer Group Series (7 books), but since i am about to go on vacation i have picked up a number of books to read while lounging on the beach. i love to read young adult books in the summer. they are so mindless and it keeps in in touch with that age group which i deal with quite often. i have packed the 4th book in Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants series, both of the Chicks with Sticks books, and a book called Alphabet Weekends by Elizabeth Nobel which i am looking forward to!
    thanks you two for the contest! happy anniversary!

  618. Boy, did that bring back memories. That was the highlight of my summer and the Summer Reading Program. I was an only child and my dad brought me up. My mother died when I was 3. He use to take me down to the library and I would be their most of Saturdays. I loved Nancy Drew and any mysteries. I remember going to the Book Mobile and new when I grew up I wanted to be the librarian working in that. How cool it was to ride around and just show people books…Now I have 20 years in the library field. Who knew it would lead to something…Awesome pictures.
    Rowena

  619. Boy, did that bring back memories. That was the highlight of my summer and the Summer Reading Program. I was an only child and my dad brought me up. My mother died when I was 3. He use to take me down to the library and I would be their most of Saturdays. I loved Nancy Drew and any mysteries. I remember going to the Book Mobile and new when I grew up I wanted to be the librarian working in that. How cool it was to ride around and just show people books…Now I have 20 years in the library field. Who knew it would lead to something…Awesome pictures.
    Rowena

  620. We had Bookmobiles in Chicago when I was a little girl (I think they may still have them). My main memory was that I was always disappointed at their tiny selection. They were for grownups too so their children’s selection was small; since I read a book a day starting when I learned to read in first grade, I exhausted the library’s selection of children’s books by the time I was 9 & they wouldn’t let me take out any teenager’s books or heaven forbid any adult books. I’m not sure what qualifies as a chapter book but I was fascinated by mythology & Victorian children’s novels as a young child. I read Black Beauty, Little Women, Rose in Bloom, Rose & Her Cousins. I also loved Five Little Peppers & How They Grew. I plan on reading Radicals in Robes before the end of the summer (& maybe I will finally finish the 9/11 Commission Report) as well as a few new knitting mysteries I bought recently.

  621. 1. Am I too young for bookmobile? I don’t think we had one in my 1980ish childhood.
    2. Laffcadio, the lion who shot back.
    3. Reading this summer? With a new baby I am lucky to have time to knit!

  622. I came back to read some of the others’ comments and enjoyed them so much!! I was reminded again and again about favorite books from my childhood -The Borrowers, Nancy Drew, Black Beauty – there were so many wonderful books! Guess what? I had those same cotton short sets, I can remember a red and white seersucker set with strawberries, boy was I fashionable!
    Remember how cool the bookmobile was? I don’t think it was airconditioned, it was just cool inside. And you had to wait your turn, only so many folks onboard at once, so you’d wait, often in the sun, then get on and it just seemed nearly icy…only memories of the ice cream truck and the slushy stand at the beach can beat memories of the bookmobiles and libraries of my youth.

  623. No bookmobile memories, we had a small local library that I enjoyed so much, I went on to become a librarian.
    Favorite childhood books, the Little House series by Laura Ingalls Wilder and the Nancy Drew series by Carolyn Keene.
    Book to read this summer (one of many) The Book Thief. Also studying Erica Knight books for knitted upholstery ideas, too little time, too many knitting ideas…

  624. 1. As I was checking out my 10 zillion books (Heinlein, Asimov, Bradbury) from the bookmobile, the librarian fixes me with an icy glare and says, “for every one of those science fiction books you read, that will be one less classic you have time for?” . . . I slunk away. . . and read my science fiction.
    2.”Mara, Daughter of the Nile”. LOVED that book.
    3. “The Yiddish Policemen’s Union”.

  625. Chapter Books: My favorite were definitely the Little House books, but my five-year-old has become taken by Nancy Drew, so that’s our current reading.
    I have been reading Animal, Vegetable, Miracle when I can find a spare moment and that’s the one I would like to finish before the end of summer!

  626. Bookmobile! Ours would arrive once a week, and I’d tramp over with my 7 books to check out 7 new ones for the upcoming week. The bookmobile parked right near the house where I was born, near the playground where the walking surface was covered with big, fat gravel, too crazy to walk on without sinking in a bit too much. My favorite book was “The Borrowers,” of course, and I borrowed it over and over. To this day it’s full of life for me. I also loved a biography of Joan of Arc (Catholic school, dontcha know), and also a book about how to become a ballerina. I didn’t become a saint or a ballerina, but I still love the library, and am still a borrower.

  627. Oh, what wonderful memories you’ve brought back. We lived with the Air Force, and nearly every base had a bookmobile. My favorites were in Kansas, when you could see it coming from far, far away (hello, rolling plains!).
    I trolled the limited but everchanging shelves for Trixie Belden, Cherry Ames, and Nancy Drew. A fantastic day was when I found one I hadn’t read (so rare, since I was a prodigious reader of some infamy in the family).
    Before the summer ends, I hope to finish The Book Thief and The Shack. With multi-hours waiting on runways to and from NYC next week, I’m sure I will.

  628. I don’t think I’ve ever been in or near a Bookmobile, but when I think of one, I get a little itchy just thinking about “that smell”! I’m wondering if anyone else remembers “The Five Little Peppers and How They Grew”. I’m pretty certain that was the book that talked about the summer it got so hot the corn field started to pop into popcorn — I always think about that when people say it’s so hot you could fry an egg on the sidewalk. For summer reading, I want to read Kate Jacobs “Comfort Food”, since her Knitting book was so good.

  629. my boys and I love the Septimus Heap books. The first one is Magyk by Angie Sage. The characters are so life like, and I wish I lived in a time when there were queens and castles and magic.
    I was planning on reading Emma by Jane Austen. Maybe I’ll get to it with a little knitting to help me along.

  630. We didn’t have a bookmobile in the city I grew up in- they went out to the suburbs. We did have a library on every third corner, and boy, did I use it! i loved the library- all those books to explore and things to learn… My favorite chapter book ws Little Women. I desperately wanted to be Beth or Amy, but I knew I was Jo. Sometimes you just are who you are. I am planning on reading Mr. Emerson’s Wife and The Omnivore’s Dilemma this summer.
    The good thing? I don’t have to write book reports anymore.

  631. We didn’t have bookmobiles in the city in which I grew up- they went out to the suburbs. What we did have was a library on every third corner. I loved my library- it was a cool, quiet escape from my hordes of siblings. And it was full of stories and things to learn. My favorite chapter book was Little Women. I desperately wanted to be Beth or Amy, but knew that I was Jo. Sometimes you just have to be who you are. I am hoping to have read Mr. Emerson’s Wife and The Omnivores Dilemma before the end of summer. The good thing? I don’t have to write book reports in September!

  632. I have a vague memory of a Bookmobile, but part of me thinks (don’t laugh) that it’s something I read. What I do remember clearly were the book sale pages we’d get from – I think – Scholastic. I’d take those home and study them, and circle many books. Thirty-five years later, I guess they still have something similar: a friend’s son kept interrupting her while we were on the phone, showing her all the books he wanted. (Okay with me – he had a rough start, and the fact that he was reading at all was cool, but he LOVES it, and is several grades ahead now.)
    I liked mysteries (then and now), and I got started early on with the Happy Hollisters and Bobbsey Twins, then moved to Trixie Belden and Agatha Christie. I’m currently reading a series by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child; I’m halfway through Book of the Dead and next up is The Wheel of Darkness.

  633. Do you know Youtube has 4 pages on the topic “bookmobile”? Here’s one:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8zOaQPQs5YY

  634. I was an avid bookmobile customer and when a job was available I became a bookmobile employee.
    What a great contest this is and how many memories shared about the influence of bookmobiles. I love bookmobile pictures.
    Gene Stratton Porter’s Laddie was my childhood favorite book. This summer I want to read the newest Janet Evanovich book!

  635. No bookmobile, I’m either too young or too suburbanite. (Where I live now, they are called “mobile libraries.”)
    I loved loved loved “Where The Red Fern Grows” as a kid.
    This summer I want to read Neuromancer!

  636. i’m sorry to say that i have no bookmobile memories, but i definitely love trips to the library.
    my favorite books as a child would have to be the ramonas – ramona the brave being the favorite. i also must add that i read the hobbit about a million times as a young girl.
    this summer i just finished reading the birth house by ami mckay (go read it now! it’s amazing) and next on the list is brida by paulo coelho.

  637. I know the contest is over but I have read through a few of the comments and would like to add mine anyway.
    When I was 20 I was hired by the Peninsula Public Library in Lawrence, New York as the Bookmobile librarian evenings. Every night, Mon-Thurs from 5:30 to 9 and Saturdays from 9 -1pm I rode with a drive and a page around the Five Towns, if you know the area, delivering books. I had this job for 2 years and loved it.We would go to places that people who lived in the area didn’t know existed. Everyone loved when we showed up. One time we got stranded because the tide came in and the BKM couldn’t get out so the locals fed us dinner and rowed us back to the main road. Winters in Atlantic Beach no one came and Summers we were filled. I’d get to the library and fill up bags with books and bring them to the most appreciative people. After many years and many jobs I am back being a librarian and at meetings I still ask if we can get a bookmobile. And they always say no!
    Favorite book as a kid? All of a Kind Family by Sidney Taylor. Can still read them today.
    I just read “The Condition” which is a perfect Summer read. Try Finding Nouf, a thriller in Saudi Arabia, Child 44 or for all you youngish mothers in NYC the Ten Year Nap.

  638. i have a book van in my life now
    not growing up -but the memory of
    walking into my first libarary
    and all those books all those books
    my little short set came with a skirt
    hedi dr dolittle pooh and eyeore
    nancy drew and magasines newspapers
    what ever my brother had hidden away
    now jaye ann krentzbooks under her other
    names dean koontz ms coulter her
    fbi books like to read don marguis
    reread dorothy sayers art books
    sunflower spendor christina dodd
    as many books as i can and i still
    like to read from the back of the
    book to the front watch the author
    try to get from the front to end without
    getting into a swamp in the middle
    my the pictures and our memory banks

  639. I lived in southern Oklahoma, at the lake, and I remember the RED BOOKMOBILE stopping on Thursday’s under the big oak tree near the post-office. I lived in the boonies- and it was a big deal to see that bookmobile pull up and if I was home- I checked out books from the bookmobile.
    I’m reading: THE FRIDAY NIGHT KNITTING CLUB

  640. Our bookmobile didn’t pull under any beautiful shade trees, but rather the parking lot of the Pines Plaza shopping center. I had no idea about any library services, as in request a book, and felt compelled to constantly take out Laura Ingalls Wilder books. I may hold the world’s rtecord for reading “By the Shores of Silver Lake.” At least in Pittsburgh.
    I still remember the machine they used to take a photo of some sort of the library card in the book. It made a wonderful clip-clop noise I found very satisfying. And I loved the cards in the back pocket. Looking at the date stamps you could tell a “hot” read from one that sat on the shelves a long time.
    A much more innocent, low tech time!

  641. good grief! …..bon chance, kay!

  642. No bookmobile memories … but as a child I loved all the Marguerite Henry books, and Laura Ingalls Wilder’s entire oeuvre. I devoured the Narnia books in two feverish days.
    Before this summer ends, I will finish A Year Without Made in China. Because people keep recommending it to me, and I’ll have time.

  643. We had the bookmobile come to our elementary school because we didn’t have a library yet. I loved going in and seeing all the little chains they had across the front of the bookshelves. It made the books seem that much more precious somehow. I have very fond memories of a particular summer reading Harriet the Spy. Currently I am reading Shamtaram, love it, and next up is Suite Francaise or Loving Frank. I’ll decide when I get there! Thanks for the memory!

  644. Oh Lord – The Bookmobile –
    I went to a small convent school with a postage stamp size library and our bookmobile was actually not for lending but for purchasing. As a child who would read while she set the table and was constantly being told to “Put Down The Book at the Dinner Table!” The coming of the bookmobile was an EVENT. We didn’t have a Barnes and Noble in those days to wander around for hours in. I remember lining up – getting only a short time to pick your books and the panic of not having enough money for all the books!
    Favorite childhood reads of all time – “Are you There God – it’s Me Margaret – Judy Blume” and of course – “To Kill a Mockingbird”
    Book to read this summer – “The Dark Side” by Jane Mayer.

  645. I used to walk to the library every Saturday, with the glasses, sans tape and pick out the maximum amount. I would walk home feeling so special and excited. I still go to the library and still wear glasses. I read 3-4 books a week, some even knitting related! My favorite book as a child was “Harriet the Spy”, I walked around with a notebook imitating her for the longest time..then I found “Pippi Longstocking”. Book I will finish is “Final Salute” by Jim Sheeler. The book is about what happens when family members get the “knock on the door” informing them that their son, daughter, husband, wife will not be coming home, or not in the way that they hoped.

  646. We did not have a book mobile.
    Amelia Bedelia for a chapter book from my childhood and my boys.
    By the end of the summer I want to finish Elinor Burkett’s So many enemies, so little time, an american woman in all the wrong places. She is an intrepid reporter who found herself teaching on a Fulbright scholarship Kyrgystan when 9/11 happened. If only we could all have her sense of humor and nuanced understanding of the world!

  647. Hi, I have never seen a bookmobile. My mom took us to the library throughout the summer. Our library did have summer reading programs though. I remember everytime your finished a book it was written on a construction paper leaf which was hung on a “tree”. I loved “Little House on the Prairie”. I plan on reading “My Life in France” by Julia Child this summer.

  648. Every summer I would beg to be allowed to stay on my Mam’s (grandmother) farm for at least a week. While I was there the book mobile would make it’s stop. I was only allowed to pick one book so I would spend as much time as possible picking out just the perfect one to read.
    I ALWAYS picked the same book, “Meg Mog”, because it was about witches named Jess, Bess, Tess and Cress who were planning a party. I loved it because it was the only book I had ever seen that had my name in it!
    The book I will have read by the end of the summer is “How to Hug a Porcupine”.
    Thank you for bringing these wonderful memories back to me.

  649. I grew up in the mid sixties in a small Maryland town. We had a great public library and school library, but I cannot remember a mobile book library. I loved Little House, everything illustrated and written by Maurice Sendak, From the Mixed Up Files…, I would bring home bags full of books. I suppose it was a good thing I was not a knitter back then (my eyes were better~ I embroidered!) I am reading Knit Together by Debbie Macomber now and also Digging To America by Anne Tyler~my very favorite author. Fun post! Cannot wait for your new book!

  650. Holy cannoli! I had a a metallic blue Schwinn Sting-Ray with sparkly banana seat too!!!! It was my first bike EVER – and I LOVED LOVED LOVED it!!! I never lived in an area that had a bookmobile until about 6 years ago – and then only for a few years. I didn’t actually use the bookmobile but saw in in the neighborhood often when I’d get home from work. I think I missed out on some cool Americana :(

  651. 1. Don’t remember a book mobile.
    2. The girl with the silver eyes. I loved it. It was about children who had special powers as a result of their mothers taking certain contraceptives (which clearly failed) prior to their births.
    3. Love Walked In