Is Starshower the new Honey Cowl? Only time will tell (but it looks good).

Fine Arts Update

mall_cop_segway.jpg
Dear Kay,
You know, Oscar season is upon us, so this is the time of year when I dream of sneaking out during the day to watch some dreary movie involving Kate Winslet. This year, she has managed to be in TWO dreary movies, one directed by her very own King of Dreary Sam Mendes. (Road to Perdition, anybody? Fun!) Maybe I’ll go for a Grim Film Back-to-Back Double Feature. At least Ralph Fiennes is in one of them: he really peps up a movie, doesn’t he?
[Warning: Slumdog Millionaire spoiler alert.]
Now that I think about it, I’m not sure I can get through a batch of Kate Winslet. I think I have become too Sensitive.
Example: I managed to sit through an entire viewing of Paul Blart: Mall Cop with the fellas, thrilling for the cop-on-Segway scenes and Paul Blart’s evolution into a badass hostage extricator. It may be the terriblest movie ever made, and I’m counting Road to Perdition in there. But I didn’t leave, even when the pretty wig salesperson seems to reject poor Paul.
Yet I could tolerate exactly sixteen minutes of the Triumphant Movie of the Year, Slumdog Millionaire, before I left and asked for my money back. Ever since I’ve had children, my tolerance for graphic violence and brutality has evaporated. There is no room in my head for that stuff. I didn’t get the memo that the first fifteen minutes of this movie include 1) torture involving a car battery, 2) boy in cesspool, 3) teacher throwing books at students, 4) mother clubbed to death in front of her sons. So poorly framed, all this mess, and so gruesomely rendered! I didn’t even remotely care what happened after this–now I have all that imagery in my head, and it’ll be there like plutonium for the rest of my life. So disappointing!
netherland.jpg
In happier news, I have been living yet another novel about New York, Joseph O’Neill’s Netherland. So absorbing, so tender a story of a man very much at loose ends after 9/11. I read a chapter of that, and I let it sink in. Plenty of sad and shock, but it takes you there without smacking you in the face like Slumdog Millionaire. Highly recommended.
Who’s Thanking Whom?
I gave some yarn to the best second grade teacher in the universe, the incomparable Ms. Smith, who has taught hundreds of second graders how to knit. In return, these came back to me:
thankyou3.jpg
How many second graders can doodle up a circular needle?
thankyou1.jpg
Or convey the elemental core of knitting:
thankyou2.jpg
Love,
Ann

102 Comments

102 Comments

  1. I hope you’ve got those at the framer’s!
    In other news, two normally stoic, gore-loving members of my book group had the same eggzact reaction to Slumdog as you did. They stayed til the end and wished they hadn’t. There is a reason this info is so carefully cropped out of the advertising that makes it look like a feel-good movie.
    I understand that the world has cruelty. I understand that a movie could need to depict that to make its point. But I don’t think I’m going to see this one no matter how many awards it wins.
    On the other hand I’m going to be very disappointed in you if you wimp out on either of the Dame Winslet (you just KNOW she’s headed for Dame-hood, that one) flicks. It is your duty as a pale blonde to support her work.

  2. I read a review of Slumdog that talked about the violence against children and swore it off immediately. I’m steamed that it’s still clogging up my local theatre. Where did Cadillac Records go? Huh? How about some music? Stoopid movies.

  3. I read a review of Slumdog that talked about the violence against children and swore it off immediately. I’m steamed that it’s still clogging up my local theatre. Where did Cadillac Records go? Huh? How about some music? Stoopid movies.

  4. Thanks for the heads-up about the film. Your warning may have been a public service. My mind is crowded with enough dreary stuff without adding things I hadn’t yet thought of in the name of entertainment.

  5. I disagree with your assessment of Slumdog Millionaire. While I did cringe quite a few times during the movie, and cover my eyes, it was the best movie that I have seen in many years. I think it presents an accurate and needed view of life in the slums, poverty and the cruelty that many face in the world. Plus, it has a great ending and a great message – that anyone can make it. Finally, for the first time in many movie viewings, I left not wondering – what the heck happened in the movie? I have been so sick of the abstract movies that often just portray violence for the sake of violence, and leave the viewer wondering the whole car ride home (and sometimes even the whole next week). I would encourage others out there to go see Slumdog Millionaire.

  6. I listened to the audio version of the book that Slumdog Milltionaire was based on, but had forgotten/blocked the violence. Or perhaps it wasn’t as slap-up-in-your-face as in the movie. Thanks for the warning; I shall avoid it now.
    That same book is in my TBR pile, although it is from the library. Perhaps I need to read it stat, just in case I can’t renew it.

  7. I also recommend you stay away from the movie Wendy and Lucy, too, a story about an inept and unloved teenager. In the middle of the movie, my very loved but apparently inept teenager texted me that she didn’t know how to use a can opener to open a can of soup, and I burst into the tears I had been holding back.

  8. I also recommend you stay away from the movie Wendy and Lucy, too, a story about an inept and unloved teenager. In the middle of the movie, my very loved but apparently inept teenager texted me that she didn’t know how to use a can opener to open a can of soup, and I burst into the tears I had been holding back.

  9. Wow, thanks for the SM review – I’ve only heard good things about it, and the premise is intriguing, but I can’t do torture or violence against the innocent, so it’s off my list.

  10. Wow, thanks for the SM review – I’ve only heard good things about it, and the premise is intriguing, but I can’t do torture or violence against the innocent, so it’s off my list.

  11. I have to admit I kind of want to see the mall cop movie! It was shot in a mall nearby (which was all set up with Christmas decorations last summer). There is very little more fun than watching a movie and picking out the liberties taken with the location- Hey! That street doesn’t end up THERE!

  12. My heart leaps for joy every time I see one of the cats in your photos. So happy not to have to see SM – anyone with imagination does not have to see evil depicted on the screen. My annual trip to the movie theater is only for the purposes of escapism and then only to a happy place, not a dreary place.

  13. Now that’s ART! You are a very lucky woman.
    Brava for having the guts to ask for your money back. I’d have just slunk out.

  14. Your fellow movie cowards thank you for the Slumdog spoiler. I even appreciate knowing that the Kate Winslets were grim – why spend ten dollars to sob over someone else’s unhappiness when crying over your own life is free?
    The worst are kid’s movies. Remember when the red balloon is lost? Now there’s weeping material for ya.

  15. Here’s another thanks for the heads up about SM. I work with sick children all day (and gladly so!) I do not need more unhappiness or pain seared into my brain.

  16. Here’s another thanks for the heads up about SM. I work with sick children all day (and gladly so!) I do not need more unhappiness or pain seared into my brain.

  17. I feel lucky that I don’t have to see violence on screen to know that there is violence in the world. Somehow, watching innocents be hurt doesn’t spur me to action. It just makes me scorn whoever created it.
    A call for help usually spurs me to action!
    Thanks for the alert about the movie!
    And I too can’t take film violence anymore.

  18. Thank you for the warning. I’m also one of those people who gets horrid visuals stuck in my brain forever, so I have to guard against getting any more, even if they’re fictional.

  19. I’m with you! The red yarn and the circulars are wonderful! There’s a knitting bookplate right there!

  20. Thanks for the SM spoiler–my Mom actually just told me that they had seen it and almost left in the 1st 20 minutes, I was shocked as I had heard nothing but rave reviews and it is portrayed as a fun, feel good movie. Many people say, “oh, I know this is a hard topic, but you HAVE to see this movie because the acting is so good, etc…” Well, I strongly disagree. As you said, now your mind has to try to delete those horrific scenes. We need to focus on what we want in our lives and in the lives of others— we cannot dwell in the filth of the gutter and ever hope to get out of it.

  21. Thanks for the SM spoiler–my Mom actually just told me that they had seen it and almost left in the 1st 20 minutes, I was shocked as I had heard nothing but rave reviews and it is portrayed as a fun, feel good movie. Many people say, “oh, I know this is a hard topic, but you HAVE to see this movie because the acting is so good, etc…” Well, I strongly disagree. As you said, now your mind has to try to delete those horrific scenes. We need to focus on what we want in our lives and in the lives of others— we cannot dwell in the filth of the gutter and ever hope to get out of it.

  22. I’m sorry to hear you (and apparently lots of others commenters) couldn’t do Slumdog. For the parts of it that are shocking and saddening, the takeaway is something that I feel like no one should miss. At its heart is essentially a story of how two people with essentially the same life experiences can turn out so differently. I found it so incredibly moving and beautiful and funny (!) even with the horrors and squalor that are depicted. None of the other best picture contenders remotely appeal to me the way this one did. Now if Wall-E had been nominated…

  23. After watching th previews of SM, I was certain that it was based on a book called Q & A, which I really, really liked. I don’t remember that many horrible things in the book, but I’m better at reading than seeing stuff like that on the screen. My nearest theater is 25 miles away. Not making the drive for it now.

  24. Thanks for the Slumdog warning. I knew there was a reason that I told hubby that I didn’t want to see it. The knitting drawings are just precious!

  25. I agree with you…why is there so much gratuitous violence in movies, on tv, etc? Isn’t there enough of that in real life?
    The knitting drawings are precious, it’s good to see children getting exposed to it so early!!

  26. I’m not sure I disagree about SM, there is no need to watch violence against children as long as it is in your head. As long as it exists in reality it should be in your head, it should torment you everyday, until it’s eradicated. Being too sensitive to watch is fine, don’t be too sensitive to do something about it.
    Frankly, the real problem with SM is that it’s a fairy tale. Those kids don’t win millions of rupees, they die by the thousands, if they survive, they produce more children to live in poverty.

  27. Motherhood has destroyed my tolerance for violence and brutality, too! Not just in movies, either. A couple of years ago I tried but could. not. read. White Fang with my husband (I know! White Fang! It’s a dog story for f’s sake!). I might still try to see Slumdog, although I’m almost as disturbed by an earlier poster’s assessment of its “great message- that anyone can make it” as I am the descriptions of the movie’s violence. Taken together, these two elements sound frankly offensive.

  28. I have just taken SM out of my netflix queue. Thank-you, I resent that the adds lead me to believe that it was a feel good movie. I have plenty of violence to deal with just listening to the news.
    I love the pictures from the children, now that gives me a smile.

  29. Re: “Slumdog Millionaire,” a young Indian woman at work told me, “You have to see it! That movie is India today.”

  30. Thanks for the heads up on Slumdog. I will skip it, just as I skipped Sweeney Todd despite J. Depp. And Ralph Fiennes did nothing for The Duchess. That movie was so boring I had to pick up my knitting.

  31. Oh, yes, “Road to Perdition!” I walked out on that one and went next door to enjoy whatever chickflick was playing (I seem to recall ladies with English accents). I maxed out on violent movies years ago and don’t think it produces any self-improvement. On my to-see list: I promised my son I’d take him to see “Mall Cop” and “Inkheart”. Thanks for the warning about “Slumdog”. I just want to be entertained–the real-life Bush years were gruesome enough for me.

  32. My sensibilities for violence (particularly that which involves children somehow) have also changed considerably since I’ve had a child (and another on the way). However, I had to have some faith that there was a point to showing what they showed, and I came out loving the film. It was very hard to watch at many junctures, but I don’t regret sticking it out.
    And c’mon! No big laughs about landing in the pile of poo? Now *there’s* a kid with determination!!!

  33. I’ve never sought violet movies (but love Pulp Fiction) and nearly tossed my popcorn at the beginning of Saving Private Ryan, and sobbed uncontrollably when the dying medic asks for his mother. And, I didn’t have kids then. Now, I can hardly watch Grey’s Anatomy if there is a sick child – thanks for the heads up, I think I would regret seeing it, but never would have left. Regardless of the message, regardless of reality. I can accept the reality without visually being beaten over the head with it. Avoid White Oleander at all costs, by the way.

  34. So with you on Slumdog. Went to see it over the holidays,left distressed and depressed. We are in the minority on that one! Skipped over the two depressing looking Winslets and went to see Milk, because a flick about a charismatic gay activist and a mayor getting murdered, and reliving an era of open discrimination & and violence against gays was the movie most likely to be cheering. (OK that came out all wrong. The movie was somehow uplifting due to Sean Penn/Harvey Milk. Not because of the era/discrmination/violence/ sad/bad parts).

  35. You walked out of SM just before it gets good! You think that stuff doesn’t go on? Especially in slums? I had no idea. The point is how he RISES ABOVE all that!
    As for The Reader, it’s not as “grim” as you think. I saw it and Kate Winslet is superb. She is amazingly talented and she looks like a normal person, not a size 00 twig. Which is why I love her and I wish I had a chance to meet her to tell her so.

  36. Thank you, thank you for the spoiler alert. I will cross it off the list of films to see. I was horribly offended by “The Cook, The Thief, et al” for all the same reasons (and the fact that none of the glowing reviews had mentioned them); and that was before I had a kid!

  37. Thanks for the warning about the vicious movie, I won’t go and see it. Can’t tolerate that sort of thing as I can never stop replaying the most awful scenes in my head and feeling terrible for the person involved!
    How lovely though to hear praise for a teacher : )
    Am training to be a primary (elementary in USA?) school teacher and usually only hear about the lack of appreciation!

  38. Thank you for the warning about Slum Dog Millionaire. My 17 year old son (home from school with a stomach virus) only moments ago walked in and told me he had downloaded it if I wanted to watch it. Because of all the hype I had heard about the movie, I was considering watching it. Now I know I will not. I only watch movies that don’t depress me, because I find that my life has had enough depressing events that I don’t need to see it on a movie screen. And I am well aware of the horrid things that go on in the world, but I do not need images in my head of torture and violence. My children (26, 24, 21 and 17) tell me that they can watch these things because they have been desensitized to violence. And they were not allowed to see violent movies until they were older. There is so much of it in so many movies. I am constantly amazed at what is allowed in PG-13 movies and why more R rated movies are not rated no one should watch this.
    Well, that was quite a diatribe. I won’t be going to the Kate Winslet movies either.

  39. Thank you for the Public Service Announcement! Hopeless violence is not entertainment for me. I can take a sad, syrupy drama and even mindless silly comedies have their place, but right now the world is tough enough and I don’t need to see any more bad stuff.
    Those thank you cards are priceless! Frame them! OR better yet, Kay should, you know, copy them onto fabric and quilt them.

  40. I never saw a preview for SM so I don’t know how it was being marketed, but if it was being touted as a “feel good” movie, then that was definitely misleading. There were many parts of that movie where I felt anything but good. However, I think you made a mistake in walking out early. The violence was harsh, but it was not gratuitous by any means. The take home message of the movie was positive and if you’d stuck it out, I think you would have had all those bad images tempered by uplifting ones. And come on, the kid jumping in the cess pool was FUNNY!

  41. thanks for the headsup about Slumdog. I get too weepy with violence and brutality, especially against those who are weak to have enjoyed it. I like to think the world is nicer than that.
    I think I can see Defiance though – there is a lovestory to it that that kind of thing easier to take…

  42. I just took in The Wrestler, another grim movie full of gratuitous violence, although it is well acted by the principals. Whatever happened to escapism? I’d like to be entertained, not cringing behind my hands every other scene. My next film excursion will be for Happy-Go-Lucky at my neighborhood theater. I need a little optimism right now.

  43. One of my friends was an extra in Mall Cop (though we haven’t gotten a confirm that she didn’t get cut in editing), so I’ve been thinking about that movie. It’s kind of surreal to recognize locations from a movie set!

  44. love the cards! what an amazing teacher to teach her classroom full of students how to knit! I also love how the feline furball is surveying the cards, as if choosing the one s/he likes best and would like to, perhaps, bat around? :o) ek.

  45. We rented Segways while on vacation in Chicago a couple years ago and it was a blast! I unfortunately drove into a hedge…
    Raising Arizona came out when I was pregnant. Everyone raved about it, but it really upset me when they drove off with the baby in the car seat sitting on top of the car. It didn’t seem funny to me at all.

  46. THANKS for the Slumdog spoilers! Everything I’ve seen and heard is all Triumph of the Human Spirit, West Side Story in India, and Oscar buzz. I, too, am Too Sensitive for scenes like that. And I would have deeply regretted spending 10 bucks to see it. Had planned to go to Slumdog this weekend; will now consider something along the lines of the one featuring a mouse with very large ears…

  47. I’m one of the many thanking you about the SM info – I think I’ll wait for video for that one, as violence can be a little easier to take on the small screen (or at least fast forwarded).
    Thanks for sharing the knitting pics – love love love them! Ms. Smith sounds like an awesome teacher. Your kids are lucky to have her!

  48. Thank you for the warning about Slumdog Millionaire. I have been trying to drag my husband to see it – he seems to sabotage every theatre date we ever set up. Based on your input there is no way I will see this. What is in the minds of people who can dream up torture and violence let alone film it and call it entertainment?

  49. I’m with you 100% Ann. I am sick to death of the “violence towards children” genre going on in movies & books. I don’t find this subject entertaining & can’t imagine what kind of person does.

  50. How lucky we are to be having this conversation. We can agree and disagree without the fear of being jailed and tortured for what we think. I totally respect the people who don’t want to go see a movie with violence (so sick of gratuitous blood and guts!) but don’t completely dismiss it when it is used to make a real point. It is called a “feel good movie” because after all the horrible stuff that happens in the boy’s life he finds a place of love and happiness in the end. Don’t give up on this movie! Maybe rent it and skip over the violence.

  51. To Nan Ketchum: Slumdog is based on that book. I’ve just ordered it to see how it compares to the movie. I never want to see a movie before reading the book (whenever there’s a book available anyway).

  52. I had the same reaction to “Gran Torino”. It was soooo depressing and violent. Didn’t have any idea it was going to be that bad.

  53. Ha! I’m not the only one. Thank you. There are a slew of movies I’ve never seen because I’m afraid they are too violent for my tender sensibilities. Kill Bill. Pulp Fiction. Schindler’s List. I was pregnant when that last one came out and didn’t want to risk upsetting myself and there fore the baby. I’m *such* a good mom.
    I bought all three Die Hard movies because I remembered enjoying them and was shocked by how much gore is in them. I didn’t remember that part. At least it was almost all bad guys (and Bruce) who were spilling their blood.

  54. I haven’t seen Slumdog yet, but actually thought Road to Perdition was good–dark, absolutely, but good. I was thinking of dragging my husband to slumdog, but now I won’t because he would hate it.
    Love the cards. Good for you for donating yarn. I should probably do the ssme.

  55. I just made my semi-annual trip to the movies, too, but I saw “Last Chance Harvey” and it was great! I do want to see “Revolutionary Road”, although I just read the book and it was a poor man’s Cheever. Kate’s no Emma! I am firmly in the camp of “art should uplift”, so no violins on TV for me.

  56. I would love to see each and every one of those drawings up close. And hear the stories that evoked the renderings. How utterly precious!
    And I thank you sincerely for the heads up about Slum. I rarely go out to see a movie anymore, instead preferring Netflix and Nitting. I wish I could remember whose blog recommended Cranford to me. I haven’t been so delighted with a story in ages and would love to thank her.

  57. I absolutely understand about not wanting to see horrible things happening to children but I think that is the point of the film. It’s not really entertainment. It’s meant to raise awareness and get people to do something to stop these things. It feels like society is to the point where graphic images are necessary to spur people on.

  58. Thanks for the heads up about Slumdog Millionaire. I’m off now to remove it from my Netflix queue.

  59. Hey Ann…I’d love to teach knitting at my school.
    Any chance you could let Mrs. Smith know so I could ask some pertinent questions?

  60. We saw Slumdog Millionaire and I would recommend it. It was very well made, and makes a point as to the treatment of children and adults in poverty. I did not expect a “feel good” movie. The cruelty was hard to view, but the industriousness of the children showed how they can strive to survive in such horrible circumstances. As to the big money prize, that did not seem that important to me. Too bad you left before seeing more than the horrible scenes at the beginning.
    tp

  61. The 2nd graders have warmed my heart — bless them, and you!

  62. It sounds like Slumdog might fall into my “Elephant Man” category of movies. I thought Elephant Man was an incredible movie… and I never want to see it again.

  63. So last night I watched 27 Dresses and Charlie Wilson’s War, both on HBO. I liked them both. I used to be able to see all kinds of gory and gruesome but since my son came along, I’ve lost my movie mojo. Maybe that’s how I got knitting mojo instead! I love reading your blog! thanks.

  64. the cards are lovely
    the knitting and the quilts
    you and kay are just fine
    tours gai my dears tours gai

  65. I also found myself truly bothered by Slumdog Millionaire. I can see how people found it uplifting and loved it–and I certainly enjoyed the “good” parts, but overall I couldn’t get past the torture and other v. difficult parts. Really threw me off emotionally.

  66. I also found myself truly bothered by Slumdog Millionaire. I can see how people found it uplifting and loved it–and I certainly enjoyed the “good” parts, but overall I couldn’t get past the torture and other v. difficult parts. Really threw me off emotionally.

  67. It is a shame that people living in slums all over the world can’t walk out, annoyed by the violence, and demand their money back. It was called “Slumdog Millionaire” and happened in the slums in India. I don’t know how one could not expect horrifying conditions, violence against children, etc.

  68. From one Mrs. Smith to another–I salute her! I’m helping one of my students on a knitting-related service project…though I didn’t teach her the basics I am helping with stuff like “so how do you get the top of a hat to be, y’know, closed” and “There are different kinds of needles?” Oh my sweet Andrea, you have so much ahead of you! I’m almost jealous.

  69. I too did not realize there was going to be violence against children before I saw the movie. I had to hide my eyes a lot. But it is an incredible movie and we can’t shut our eyes to what’s happening in the world. At the very least, you come away realizing how very, very lucky we all are. Plus there’s a happy ending!!!

  70. I too did not realize there was going to be violence against children before I saw the movie. I had to hide my eyes a lot. But it is an incredible movie and we can’t shut our eyes to what’s happening in the world. At the very least, you come away realizing how very, very lucky we all are. Plus there’s a happy ending!!!

  71. Yeah SM was pretty violent, but it grew on me more and more since I have seen it. I also had the urge to leave at the beginning and really wasn’t in the mood to see something so raw. The ending made up for it… at least for me!
    It is funny how things like this can really just hit a nerve. I read the beginning of the Kite Runner several years ago and had to stop. I have heard what an amazing book it is, but I just couldn’t get past the initial act of violence. I probably won’t ever finish it.

  72. What a great picture, that one with the circular needles and red knitting, the ball of yarn extending from it. So life-like in a “Grandma Moses” sort of way! It really took me there, and made me long to get back to my needles! If only I didn’t have to be up so early in the morning…
    The way you have those drawings by the 2nd graders arranged reminds me of a quilt (a quilt about knitting!)
    Thanks.
    LoveDiane

  73. Thank you SO much for the heads up about Slumdog Millionaire. I cannot handle that kind of violence and now I know I have to avoid that movie at all costs. My DH loves those kind, but he very nicely waits until I’m out of town to rent them, then has a bloodfest without me. YUK!

  74. While I understand that the violence in SM may be realistic, I too appreciate the heads up as neither the movie’s marketing nor the recommendations from friends in favor of it have indicated that there is anything that would make for more than momentary discomfort. I’ve only heard the “it’s so well made” and “it’s such a good story” bits which would have meant that the first difficult moments would have been a real shock.
    Thanks for the warning! Now, if I see it I will at least be prepared.

  75. While I understand that the violence in SM may be realistic, I too appreciate the heads up as neither the movie’s marketing nor the recommendations from friends in favor of it have indicated that there is anything that would make for more than momentary discomfort. I’ve only heard the “it’s so well made” and “it’s such a good story” bits which would have meant that the first difficult moments would have been a real shock.
    Thanks for the warning! Now, if I see it I will at least be prepared.

  76. Sorry about the double post — it looks likes there is a lot of them in this edition of comments. For me, the comments box never indicated that it had successfully sent the info (said “contacting masondixonknitting.com for a very long time before I tried hitting post again and then finally gave up and reloaded the comments to see if it had worked.
    Is there something wrong with how your server is processing the comments?

  77. A friend of mine also left SM early on, unable to watch, so I am happy to leave it off my “must watch” list. I did, however, make it through Paul Blart, also for the sake of some boys, and have resigned myself to the fact that it amounts to 90 minutes of my life I’ll never get back…
    the sacrifices we make..

  78. What brilliant and wonderful drawings! I think the world could do with a lot more of 2nd grade art (insert rant about arts funding in schools) .
    As for movie rules, I’m all for them. As a military brat, I steer clear of military movies – too many of my nightmares brought to life.
    And as for Slumdog having a lovely ending – I’m not there with you. I thought the movie was a sugar coating on real life with a saccharine end. Tim O’Brien, In the Things They Carried, talks about “no such thing as a good war story.” Essentially, he says there are no heroics or poetry or lessons learned or any of those things we come to expect from stories. Things that happen in war just are. Brutal and without sense. Unfortunately, life can be that way too. Slumdog works much too hard at bringing sense to some of the horrific things that happen to children.

  79. Glad to see I’m not the only one who’s too sensitive to sit through Slumdog Millionaire. I thought I was just being a wuss.
    Meanwhile, much of Mall Cop was filmed right here in Burlington MA and my daughter and her firends couldn’t wait to see it – looking for themselves in the background, seeing at how they gussied up the mall. Even she recgognized a bad movie, but they loved it anyway.

  80. Love the drawings, how basic two sticks and some string. Knit.

  81. I saw more violence then I ever wanted to see during jury duty. The real thing not Hollywood stuff. I had nightmares for a longtime, so I avoid these type movies like poision

  82. I saw enough violence during jury duty. The real thing not Hollywood gore. I had nightmares for a long time after jury duty. I avoid these type movies like poison.

  83. Thank you for the movie heads up. ICK. And the book suggestion, it sounds thoughtful and good, and that’s what I need. Movie violence against adults in a totally fictional way is ok with me, but not violence towards kids.
    Hey – all those nice thank yous from the 2nd graders could make an awesome little stitched together book…. just sayin’, cuz I know you don’t have anything else to do. :-)

  84. Thanks for the heads up on Slumdog. Thanks also for the company – my capacity for watching certain movies has also tanked since having kids. I used to be a sucker for a good tear jerker and now I Just Can’t Watch them anymore. Weird. Violence….depends on the violence – but what you described? Would have been beyond my tolerance too. Cheers.

  85. Thanks for the heads up on Slumdog. Thanks also for the company – my capacity for watching certain movies has also tanked since having kids. I used to be a sucker for a good tear jerker and now I Just Can’t Watch them anymore. Weird. Violence….depends on the violence – but what you described? Would have been beyond my tolerance too. Cheers.

  86. I’m a little late, but do want to express my relief at reading that there are so many others like me. If something horrible is done to a child in a movie or on television, I just can’t take it. My tolerance for violence in media, generally took a huge nosedive since having kids, but when it involves children, I turn into a blubbering puddle. My 15-year-old asked if Apocalypse Now was a good movie. I said, “Yes, it made a big impression on me.” He asked if I’d watch it with him, and I had to say no. I admitted it gave me nightmares for years, and that I don’t think I could take more than a few minutes at my advanced age.
    Is this bad? No! Violence to other humans SHOULD make us sick!

  87. As a family, we went to see Paul Blart, and were glad to see a film that had no nudity or strings of curse words. Light on plot? Sure, but we found it entertaining and good for a few laughs. We left the movie feeling upbeat, and glad we’d had a family movie night together.
    ~ Dar

  88. I wish people would see SM, not because of the violence, for the reality depicted of children living in poverty. At the beginning of the movie you see children living in the garbage heaps of Mumbai. I think it’s important for people to know that exists.
    I was turned off by the feel good ending, that seemed like a complete fairy tale especially when it started so firmly grounded in reality.
    But I guess we all look for different things when we go to the movies.

  89. Thank you so much for validating my irrational feelings of not wanting to see either of the Winslet movies or Slumdog.

  90. Thank you so much for validating my somewhat irrational feelings for not wanting to see either of the Winslet movies or Slumdog. Now I can not see them without guilt!

  91. Actually, Mrs. Smith is the world’s next-to-best second grade teacher. The BEST second grade teacher is my daughter Katy, who also teaches kids how to knit. Like me, she is an avid knitter who wants to spread the good word, so she holds a knitting class in the school’s After School program. She loves to see those little kids sitting around knitting and talking about boys (but only after their homework is done, of course!)

  92. I just want to know how long was it before the cat kicked all of the kiddies’ cards out of order?
    Haven’t seen SM — with no rugrats of my own, violence doesn’t bother me on a primal level — but then again, I’m a scumdog reporter who “lives for this stuff” — or so they say.
    I’m about to engage in a major rip-a-thon with a friend’s poncho. The published directions are wrong. So wrong that there is no way to get around it: the thing is lopsided. It might be the first time I ever sent in a correction to a knitting magazine. Can I get a dayum?

  93. I am so disappointed to hear about slum dog. I had heard such wonderful things, but I should have known that no movie gets raves without something awful in it.
    Love the little notes from the kids!

  94. Dear Ann, I used to make fun of my own mother for the reason you describe–having become too Sensitive. She couldn’t watch violence and cruelty, and I mocked her for it. But how the mighty (and mightily sardonic) have fallen. Having now had children myself, I can’t stomach it anymore either. This is one of the reasons I had to stop watching Lost and 24, which sounds heretical to most, but if whatch’re watching on the tube keeps you up at night, then Hollywood, we have a problem. Or Bollywood, as the case might be. As an aside, have you seen The Prizewinner of Defiance, Ohio? It is one of Julianne Moore’s finest films, and a must for anyone who is a mother or a daughter. I highly recommend it for you, my dear. All my best, Karen

  95. I just have to say it: Kudos to you for your stance and comments about movies with graphic violence against the innocent! I’m with you! I learned long ago that those images stick in my head and are not good for my soul. I am still razzed by my in-laws for leaving the room years ago while watching Braveheart on video. When they killed his wife, that was the end for me. I don’t need to watch ANYTHING with that much violence regardless of what “message” it may hold. They say “What an uplifting movie!?????” They have got to be kidding!
    It’s so nice to know I am not alone as a “sensitive spirit.” Thank you!

  96. Awesome artwork! I ditto, Frame em!

  97. Shoot, I’d rather see something goofy about a mall cop actually preventing crime (And on a segway!) than something depressing-then-uplifting and “Good.” I go to movies to forget how depressing my life is, not to see how depressing other people’s lives are.

  98. Late to the party. I wish I had read this before my husband and I went to SM last night. I left after the car battery torture. I know that people are unspeakably cruel to one another, that there is poverty and hopelessness. I don’t find watching re-enactments of it entertaining.

  99. Thanks for the 2nd grade drawings and for the SM spoiler, Ann!
    I heard Danny Boyle on NPR talking about what freaked him out when he went to Mumbai (sp?) and so I’d already heard his horrible story about how parents will mutilate their own children because a beggar with one hand gets more than a beggar with both hands. I, like Lee, know that people are horrible to each other, and I know that I need to KNOW about these things in the world, but I don’t really want to watch it in a movie.

  100. I just got back from about 3 weeks in India. Slumdog isn’t depicting “gratuitous violence” – it’s really like that.
    I am grateful that this movie was made. I think it’s important that the lucky few of us who live without violence in our lives KNOW that most of the rest of the world DOES live with this voilence every single day.
    I’m sorry that you didn’t watch it – and I’m more sorry that you have discouraged others from seeing it.
    (but I still love your blog and was excited to see a signed copy of your book waiting in my mailbox when I got home to the US!!! Knit on!)

  101. I just got back from about 3 weeks in India. Slumdog isn’t depicting “gratuitous violence” – it’s really like that.
    I am grateful that this movie was made. I think it’s important that the lucky few of us who live without violence in our lives KNOW that most of the rest of the world DOES live with this voilence every single day.
    I’m sorry that you didn’t watch it – and I’m more sorry that you have discouraged others from seeing it.
    (but I still love your blog and was excited to see a signed copy of your book waiting in my mailbox when I got home to the US!!! Knit on!)

  102. The NYTimes has some explanation regarding the scenes you object to in the movie “Slumdog Millionaire”
    http://roomfordebate.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/02/20/the-real-roots-of-the-slumdog-protests/