Am feeling very tender about Eleanor Roosevelt this week. (She knits in Episode 4!)

Perfect Handknit: The Hard Part Begins

Dear Kay, and the Committee of Semi-Defeated Yet Stalwart Handknitters,
Never mind the irregularities at the polls–the blue-fingered agitators, the accusations of nefarious alphabetization, the excessive consumption of Screech Rum drunk in protest–we have all weighed in.
I find this very interesting. The fact is, for many and various reasons, few of us are totally happy with the results. We all feel a little uncomfortable, a little steered down a path toward something we didn’t quite want, a little compromised. “Our” yarn didn’t “win.” “Their” yarn “sucks.” Well, in the world of Future Search, this is considered a HUGE SUCCESS! This is fantastic! When we all compromise, we’re all miserable. TOGETHER!
[15-minute break to hug, adjust nametags, return to banquet room]
The results are fascinating:

Total votes: 507
Cascade 220 (Peruvian wool) 20.7% 105
Koigu Painter’s Palette Pure Merino variegated (merino wool) 17.6% 89
Debbie Bliss Cashmerino Chunky or Aran (merino/microfiber/cashmere) 10.5% 53
Karabella Aurora 8 merino (merino wool) 9.9% 50
Rowan Wool Cotton (merino/cotton) 8.5% 43
Rowan Calmer (cotton) 7.3% 37
Elsbeth Lavold Silky Wool (wool/silk) 6.9% 35
Patons Classic Merino (merino wool) 5.9% 30
Debbie Bliss Baby Cashmerino (merino/microfiber/cashmere) 5.7% 29
Rowan Kidsilk Haze (mohair/silk) 4.5% 23
Yarn recycled from sweater bought at thrift shop 2.6% 13

Observations:
A majority voted for yarn with merino in it.
A near majority voted for DK weight.
A quarter voted for aran weight.
The yarn we ended up selecting, Cascade 220, is actually a remarkable fit if you consider that it is DK weight; available in 155 colors including solids, heathers, and tweeds; is available in a machine washable version as well as a handwash; is relatively inexpensive (around $7 for 220 yards); is good for felting. Go take a peek at the shade card–it’s an insane variety of colors. For the disenfranchised members of the UnWoolly Activities Committee, DK weight cotton exists in many forms. For freaks who can’t stand anything except merino, there are numerous DK-weight merino wools. For Kidsilk Haze supporters, I got nothin’. Really sorry about that. If you triple it, maybe it kind of works?
Y’all, it could have been worse.
My suggestion for the moment is that we take these results, carry them in our Future Search binders, and return to them a bit later. We have learned a lot (namely, that Mary B discovered that Noro Kureyon actually softens when you wash it), but we’re not done. Oh, no. We’re just getting started.
Prouds and Sorries
We move on. What is the thing that we are going to knit? What is the perfect project? Our next exercise is called Prouds and Sorries. The Prouds are easy: the projects you loved best. But we learn from our mistakes, too, from our Sorries. We will all need to dig deep for this one, to dislodge what are perhaps your lowest, saddest moments as a knitter.

Your mission: Please leave a comment in which you describe your Prouds and Sorries.

Let’s have your Prouds and Sorries in hand by Wednesday, September 21, 6:15 pm.
Beverage nominations remain open, as always.
Love,
Ann
PS We’re having a breakout session in which Future Searchers explore the complex issues that have arisen so far. Talk among yourselves–I have to go on break now.
Bex asks: “Is it possible that the perfect handknit includes more than one yarn? Can there be two perfect yarns? Maybe some solid and variegated of the same weight and fibre? I know it makes the voting more complicated but Ann, you’re the gal in charge, right? Couldn’t you just make the choice for us? Oh, or maybe we should just elect some officials who could make the decision for us?”
Mary de B: “What worries me here is that we’ll have our yarn before we know what we’re knitting with it. ”
Amy: “Do we need to have breakoff group to discusss diversity issues? Are cotton lovers feeling left out of the process? What about spinners who create their own perfect yarn? Are we marginalizing the already oppressed? Can we appoint an already marginalized person as head of this subcommittee with no power to appease their complaints without having to take them to seriously?”
Emily: “As a stout Calmerian and longtime cardholding member of the Rowan Party I have to object to the alphabetization of the yarns!! I assert that Koigu, Debbie Bliss and Cascade are only in the top three positions because of their alphabetical luck to be placed at the top of the list. I blame the ballot! Its got chads, chads, I tells ya! ”

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70 Comments

70 Comments

  1. So I have, after all these years, still never made a sweater. (Hangs head in shame, saying “I’m swatching for one now, mmmkay?) But I beg beg beg that we design a cardigan, because cardigans are infinitely superior because they are so wearable, and the perfect sweater will be really wearable. If we design a cardigan, I promise to make it. I heart Cascade even though I didn’t actually vote for it. I feed it to felt very regularly.

  2. Hmmm….best project ever: Shapely Tank. Worst project ever: a scratchy, too-small no-name sweater of my own design based on Knitty’s Kyoto. I got the yarn from my grandmother, who got it in Canada in 1962. Bad idea, folks, bad idea.

  3. I’m always Proud of my knitted lace shawls – and yes, I do have grey hair and remember when the Beatles were on Ed Sullivan, but a shawl is way cool no matter your age. However, shawls in DK or worsted look like bad knitting to me. Need the finer stuff, you know.. I think it would turn out to be a Sorry. Maybe a Ruana instead?

  4. best project ever would have to be the first pair of socks I ever made. I used my own handspun alpaca and I love, love, love them. Worst project would be the first (and only) sweater I have ever knit. It was an Icelandic knit in the round. Turned out beautifully. The problem? No swatching was involved. The sweater is too small. Plus, scratchy Lopi? Requires no less than two layers underneath.

  5. best project ever would have to be the first pair of socks I ever made. I used my own handspun alpaca and I love, love, love them. Worst project would be the first (and only) sweater I have ever knit. It was an Icelandic knit in the round. Turned out beautifully. The problem? No swatching was involved. The sweater is too small. Plus, scratchy Lopi? Requires no less than two layers underneath.

  6. One the Proud side…well, I can knit socks and hats and lace that I really like. However, my sorry is that I have yet to knit a sweater that I like. Other people like them but, I hate the way they look.

  7. Worst project ever- my first sweater, from VK magazine. I made all the rookie mistakes:
    -subbed yarn of a different gauge
    -used acrylic yarn, thinking it a clever alternative to pricey natural fibers
    -actually, it was *black* acrylic yarn
    -changed stitch from moss to stockinette
    The final result? A wide cropped sweater with wide cropped sleeves and edges that rolled. (I won’t even mention the lace collar, which I never mastered).
    Proudest achievement: Kid Silk Haze lace dress, Butterfly (cover of Rowan 37).

  8. Proud: A lovely cabled Starmore sweater in that slightly varigated Araucania wool. An accident of me not realizing it was varigated when I ordered it, it has a beautiful depth to it.
    Sorry: A pattern I loved was shown on a hanger instead of a person (I’ve learned since then). There were cables over each shoulder that, when worn, looked like epaulets. When I tried the seamed sweater on the first time, my husband looked up and said “You look like a Klingon!”
    Much later–much, MUCH later, the yarn was used in a perfectly nice felted bag, so there was a happy ending.

  9. best project ever: still searching. hoping that the cardigan we make (hint hint) will get that esteemed vote.
    worst project ever: my first sweater, ‘redesigned’ by little old ladies in albuquerque from a 1950’s columbia minerva book given to me by my grandmother; in tweed. ick.
    drink vote: martini’s, natch. shaken, not stirred. with the big fatso olives (salad) and a twist.

  10. I think my favorite pattern to knit has been Elizabeth Zimmerman’s Best Baby Sweater. It’s knit from the neck down in one piece and has only two small underarm seams. You can easily change the lace pattern with another of your choice. It knits together really quickly too. I’ll get back to you on the worst thing, I’ve seemed to block those from my memory. I don’t think many of them have seen the light of day.

  11. Prouds and Sorries – ugh, reminds me of a woman who insisted on saying that at every meeting. Made me want to slap her.
    Prouds: My Rogue. I had to do cable surgery. Had to graft the hood. Had to actually finish it. Knit the bottom in a size larger than the top to fit my curves/nonexistent shoulders. Fits like a dream and I wear it all the time. Proved that I can wear wool if it’s merino.
    Sorries: The Damn Sweater. Newbie knitters buys more Lion Brand Homespun than anyone should, “designs” sweater for 6’5″ boyfriend based on the measurements of the overly loose clothing he usually wears. Knits the fronts and back, sew the shoulders together, and tries it on the man proudly. Said yarn stretched to his knees, armholes started somewhere near his belt, and the horizontal striping did nothing for his figure. It still sits in a paper bag at the bottom of the bottomest yarn bin.
    Beverage: martini shaken within an inch of it’s life, 4 olives, and a splash of olive juice.

  12. Important bit first – Drink – a really good, dryish ‘minerally’ Riesling. Best knit – can’t decide, but favourite probably the 1984 Phildar intarsia that Kay has seen a picture of. Worst – scarf made at request of friend (very recently) made from some Colinette yarn which looked beautiful but which was worse to knit with than wire. (I kid you not). In the absence of The Glorious Blueness That Is Denim I voted for Cascade 220, but am still reeling from the shock that denim didn’t make it. You don’t know what you’re missing, all you non-denimers! Still, more for the Denim Angels….

  13. I’m proudest of a lovely, simple v-neck I made for my husband out of ArtFibers Scottie Tweed. It fits perfectly, has no visible mistakes, and he loves it. There are lots of hats and socks that I’m also very proud of.
    Sorries: Ouch, I’ve got lots. I made a horizontally striped tank top out of DK cotton, which I DOUBLED to get the pattern gauge, making a garment that was heavy, unattractive, made me look like a tank, and had a zillion ends. I didn’t even rip it. I put it in a dark bag until it stopped hurting and then threw it out. There was also a loosely knit cardigan in an eye-searing vaguely chenille-like yarn that twisted up on itself, biased, and then made a sweater that continuously slid off my shoulders under its own weight. It went to Goodwill. I hope someone recycled it for dish clothes.
    Drinks: Mint Juleps, darling, and just keep adding bourbon.

  14. My most Proud would have to be my eldest daughter’s baby blanket knit during my pregnancy. I chose it for the memories it contains as well as the love it has received–it is now a mostly felted,strangely colored thing,that while it no longer resembles a blanket, still gets used nightly. My least Proud would have to be the sweater I knit this summer for my middle child. I was so proud of the sweater (pattern from A. Budd’s book) that is, until I couldn’t get it over my daughter’s bewildered head. I kept trying, she kept protesting “it doesn’t fit Mommy” me, teeth gritted:”let’s just pull a little harder”…

  15. Drink – Gin and Tonic with lots of lime – yum!
    Proud – Sweater I knit my son in silky wool with celtic cables from Viking Knits.
    Sorry – Baby sweater knit from #$%^@ acrylic chenille – it biased, wormed and shed like crazy and seaming it was hell. Then, when I finally had that stupid thing done, the neck was too small and wouldn’t fit over the kid’s neck. It’s now on a teddy bear.
    Though we aren’t technically talking about items we’d want to knit, I too love cardigans!

  16. Proud: Leaf Lace Shawl
    Sorry: my first attempt at a cabled sweater

  17. Proud: My first sock. I still don’t have the other one, but that first one is fantastic.
    Sorry: The acrylic and eyelash scarf that my friend requested when I was still new enough not to know better. I put it away unfinished last year, and now that winter and her birthday are looming, made my boyfriend finish it.

  18. Ann: Thanks for opening our eyes to the incredible variety and versatility of calmer! I did…ahem…handle this one at my local LYS and was surprised that I’ve never knitted with this before!
    Proud: Would have to be the recently completed hourglass sweater which, because my LYS did not have enough cash iroha of any single color, I was pushed into doing the math to stripe a sweater that would use uneven amounts of 5 colors – it came out awesome, and I had just a yard or two of each color leftover! I had to frog a few times, but I think that makes me even prouder of the absolute perfection of the result!
    Sorry: I have an embarassing collection of what we’ll call “early hats,” which utilize brilliant color change, pattern, and shaping, but which would only fit people with very shallow or very fat heads. Apparently I was going after form, not function. I am loathe to frog them, but they sit in an embarassed heap at the bottom of a drawer. Sigh. I promise, I’ve since learned my lesson, and anthropologists can tell you that samples of work from the “late hats” period show increased sophistication and wearability.

  19. Proudest moment: Pam from Rowan 31. It was perfect. The perfect yarn (for the project, I’m open minded, it was Rowan Wool Cotton), the perfect pattern (challenging, cables, short repeats), the perfect recipient (my lovely auntie, who appreciates hand knits).
    Saddest moment: My first “design” experiment, which was basically modifying a pattern from “Vintage Knits” to a completely different yarn and changing the cuffs. Didn’t work. Didn’t fit. Made me look fat. Haven’t tried “designing” again.

  20. Proud: two, both sweaters I knit for my children. One was the pirate sweater from “Adorable Knits for Tots”, my first attempt at intarsia. The other was a sweater for my daughter knit in less than two weeks after I realized that her Easter dress was sleeveless and the weather was cold.
    Sorry: every single attempt I’ve ever made at short-row toes and heels for socks. I cannot seem to make them work.

  21. Oh, and may I add that I find the pictures of rooms and rooms of Martha pictures more than a wee bit frightening?

  22. Oh, have I got a Proud for you: My Ribby Cardi, knit in one solid/one tweedy Cascade 220, but not yet published in designer Bonne Marie’s gallery due to its lack of zipper installation. I blame our recent move ~ I have yet to unearth (read: unpack) the dang zip. But BMB’s patterns are so well written that she may be my favorite designer, and, yes, I’m one of the 105 who voted for C220 (both times!).
    As to the Sorry, well, I’m sorry that whoever taught me to knit, or sold me yarn & pattern, forgot to mention gauge. in my prior knitterly incarnation, I made a cardigan wherein the pattern called for 15st/4″ on US10s. When, after a dozen or so years, I ripped and recycled, I knit the same yarn to 16st/4″ on US8s. The newer version fits; I’m not sorry that I saved the original for the yarn harvest!

  23. As long as the olives are stuffed with Maytag Blue Cheese, I’m in.
    Proud: Zoe Mellor Tartan Jacket. Love it, my fave and I wear it all the time. Plus, it just looks damn cool. Also, my own design for #1 son. An Autumn pullover with and Intarsia Acorn on one side and an Intarsia Squirrel on the other. Too stinking cute!
    Sorries: About 15 years or so, my Dad asked me to knit him a vest (bad sign, run away-FAST!) out of cashmere. The little teeny, tiny, really freakin’ expensive one. Okay, he was paying for the yarn and I was looking to impressive him after dropping out of college. (ahem)
    I asked for his measurements, he sent me 3 conflicting sets. And I shoulda stopped right there, but Noooooooooo! And some very abstract and vaugue instructions about this part needed to be looser and this tighter. (Play dead so the whole situation will disapear) This thing was enormous, he never wore it and I don’t think he ever even tried it on. And didn’t hear me when I told him to have it tailored. The knitting was beautiful but it would have fit Sasquatch and the ick factor was pretty high. I think I need to go shower now.

  24. Drink: red wine, perhaps Bonnie Doon’s Big House Red
    Proud: my first sweater, which was intended to be for me, but fits my husband perfectly. It’s a gorgeous, complicated striped pattern from an old issue of Knitters.
    Sorry: a white lace sweater that I tried to resize–damn math! It’s gigantic, I even tried to shrink it, and it’s hiding in a drawer of shame.

  25. Not to throw everyone for a loop or anything, but could we talk about general items we would like to knit first (like cardigans, for instance) and then decide on specific design elements later? To conform, though, my prouds would include socks, hats and lace, and my sorry is a terrible shapeless cotton tank.

  26. Remember when you mixed all the paint colors in art class when you were seven and you got a brown sludge? It seems there are different horses for different courses!
    Most proud; Midnight Carnation by Kaffe Fassett, the blue-greens in the centre were a hypnotic pool for your eyes to drown,
    Sorriest; Finishing a project in Acrylic Slubbed Yuk for MIL, I felt violated.

  27. Proud: a “fake Fassett” made from sleeve to sleeve of Lopi in a million colours. I used a standard Lopi sweater sleeve pattern, then cast on lots of stitches for the body and worked across the body (making a head hole) and then decreased and made the other sleeve. It’s warm, not too short, not too baggy. The Cascade would work great with such a project since the colour selection is so great. But of course then we’d have to find the perfect sleeve pattern to start from.
    Sorry: Hmm, I think a lot of the sorry sweaters are just ones where we didn’t know what we doing! I tried another “fake Fassett” with only 6 colours, and since I was knitting with yarn way off the gauge of the original, I just made up the sleeve shaping, and so had sleeves of very odd proportions. The body is just a rectangle, so not too hard! I actually used it quite a lot, but now I am keeping it because I think I can frog it and make something better. Also I have sorry things that are sorry because I didn’t sew the sleeves in properly, didn’t fix some glaring mistake, didn’t do that “finishing” as well as I should have.
    These are very long comments, aren’t they!?

  28. First, a general question: Is the Perfect Handknit a gift to someone you really love who will totally appreciate it? Or is the Perfect Handknit something you make for yourself because no one else ever would?
    I can’t decide which way I go on this ethical dilemma.
    Proud: The Fair Isle I made last year — the one with the buttons you all helped me choose, though I did not choose the largest vote getter.
    Sorry: The college boyfriend sweater. Enough said.

  29. Yeah for Cascade 220! I vote for a cardigan, so I can wear it to work. BTW, that’s also why I prefer solid colors. It’s hard to find a business casual variegated yarn.
    Drink: margarita. Ladies, bring on the tequila!
    Sorry: Lion Brand acrylic electric blue baby cardigan for my son. When it approached water, the damned thing pilled like crazy. The shape was entirely wrong. The color was electric. It was scratchy, and the sleeves were too short. He never wore it. Yucky.
    Proud: Annie Modesitt’s Fiesta Tea Set from Interweave Knits Summer 2004.

  30. Proud: The lace wrap I knit for my mother for her 50th birthday last year. I used Filatura di Crosa Trilly, a cashmere silk blend that I had to put on hold and buy one ball at a time. I designed it myself with several lace patterns, had a major mess-up when 2/3 finished and decided just to start over (I kept re-thinking the bottom border) and it turned out just stunning. My mom loves it.
    Sorry: This ridiculous poncho I made out of nasty plastic-net like yarn. The yarn looked so cool in the ball, I whipped up a poncho 2 years ago- but when knitted it turned into the ugliest thing EVER! It bounced when I walked- but I never made it out of the house because within 5 minutes it had snagged on areas of the apartment I didn’t know had snagged. So misguided.

  31. Proud(the few): Second sweater I knitter for my 90+ grandma, who knows all seasons are good seasons for a handknit handspun wool sweater (yep, even August in VA. Great thing about advanced age is you always wear your wool handknits). The first one I knitted for her was good too. And my first sock–very proud.
    Sorry: Tivoli T from stash lime green cotton. Sizing not right, gauge not right, and I even made a GLARING mistake where no one could miss it. I think its time to rip and turn it into dishcloths. No point in all that good fiber going to waste.

  32. Drink nomination: pastis. The whole “Ricard vs. Pernod” thing matters not to me … all I care is that a little over ice cuts through Florida’s heat and humidity.

  33. Prouds:
    An Adrienne Vittadini cabled boatneck pattern, knit in Tess’ Designer Yarns Silk/Wool, because it fit just right, and the yarn both shows off the cables and feels lovely against my skin.
    Rogue, in Mission Falls wool, because it fits perfectly and is a great casual-but-not-too-casual layering piece; in other words because it’s versatile.
    Sorries:
    The Jaeger pullover I tried to knit in Rowan 4ply, because I ignored the fact that my gauge was off and insisted to myself that it would work, just because I loved how the eyelet pattern looked in the yarn. unwearably large.
    A long jacket-type cardigan that I tried to adjust for a different gauge and lengthen but messed up the math horribly, and then knit in a cotton blend that was way too heavy for all that length. Hmm, now that I recall the sweater I think I could rip out all that black cotton cleece and use it for something I’ll actually wear…
    And of course my vote for drinks: sidecars. with cointreau, not triple sec, and sugared rims.

  34. PROUD: Fassett China Clouds. Perfection – well except for the fact it is a bit short and makes me look square…
    SORRY: Peace Fleece Everyday Cardigan- cant even imagine how i thought I would wear this- smelled while making it, then was shorter than even the project above(see a trend?) and BOXY. ugh. Wore it once – it is now half an unfinished messenger bag. Who is sorry now?!
    Cascade 220 – works for me!
    Off to mix some ice tea- my drink of choice.

  35. Proud sweaters: last year, the Ribby Cardi from Chicknits, the Klaralund,& the Knitty Grace all were thumbs up. When I was seriously guernsey fixated, the Yankee Knitter Guilford Guernsey floated my boat in every size I made. http://www.iseespots.com/iseespots/images/ykd17.gif
    I wouldn’t mind making another Ribby Cardi, it has many options.
    Sorries: oh many, many. Style mistakes – a bright red bulky basketweave with a boatneck comes to mind, I looked like a ready to pop stuffed cartoon brick house in it. Many sad sorries due to lack of gauge swatch compliance or failure to measure my own arm or others’ body length. A trickly lace wrap style flopped. (as does all tricky lace for me)
    I do not know how you’ll get the Future Search settled on one sweater. Same with drinks, I mean, Margaritas still sound good…or red wine’s OK…..or white wine because it doesn’t stain the yarn if you spill while knitting…..

  36. Proud: The cabled “wedding sweater” that I designed for my husband years before we married. Alice Starmore’s Kilronnan, and anything and everything I’ve ever designed for myself.
    Sorry: The booties that came out in two sizes when I was drinking and knitting. Just say no. Or at least nurse your drink.
    Drinks: Margaritas are my knitting drinks of choice, but I’m with jpt on the pastis – sounds good, and since she doesn’t care, let’s pick Pernod. xox, (the other jpt)

  37. Proudest : shawl from own spun cashmere/merino laceweight !
    Sorries : anything that didn’t fit/turnout quite right.
    Drink : Pinot Grigio.A nicely chilled margarita is always nice. ;-]

  38. P.S. Despite being SAMASFOW’s founding member, I’m happy with Cascade 220. It’s a nice yarn with an old-fashioned feel to it, and I think we have some hope of making something nice out of it.
    I think it would be fun if everyone had an entry on their own blogs when this is over detailing all their own choices, so that we could see what everyone’s “ultimate sweater” looks like (particularly in koigu – call me cynical!). If you do it, I’m in!

  39. The Proud has to be conquering Birch at my fifth flippin’ attempt. The Sorry is a beautiful 4ply Patrica Roberts cardigan that I knit whilst struggling with depression many many years ago, my tension was so tight that it turned out too small for me, however it went to a good home. I am hopeful that I may soon attempt another as our darling Rowanette Jill has found the said pattern for me even though its about shhhh(25years old), so it may be a Proud one day!

  40. Proud – Kaffe Fassett sweater Tumbling Blocks in my own colourway that KF himself called ‘most interesting’ (and I am taking that as a compliment).
    Sorries – heaps of them – just as many now as there were 50 years ago, I never seem to learn…..Various lace shawls that I have attempted where I lose the plot once the pattern says’ carry on the chart increasing as before’.
    I vote for a cardigan as being more useful too, and I’m a gin and tonic girl….

  41. Sorry: The bunting I tried to make for my first child, the gauge was wrong, the color was wrong and it now sits on our hippy teddy bear, waiting for dead tour to come around.
    Proud: A few, actually. Broadripple Socks, which I wear despite my tiff with the designer. And my recently renovated purple sweater.
    Drink: Very cold, very dry, Kettleone martini, straight up, extra olives please.
    What to make? How about a warm sweater I can fit under a winter coat?

  42. Prouds : Starmore fair-isles, anything by Kaffe Fassett if I ever finish it, anything that FITS me perfectly, gorgeous lace shawls
    Sorries : sleeveless turtleneck from a very bulky yarn.

  43. Prouds: Chemo caps I designed and knit for my mother, and anything I make for my sons, usually socks, hats, scarves & blankets. I’m very lucky to be rewarded with hugs from my teenage boys who request specific knit items, and then actually use/wear them!
    Sorry: Scratchy Lopi pullover that I made because I thought Lopi was cool. It’s HOT, scratchy, and sheds hair & “stuff” all over.
    Drink: G&T w/ lots of fresh squeezed lime and lime pulp.
    I agree, we need to make a cardigan!

  44. ….thinking of ditto-ing the sweater from the top down…..in any size….(proudest moments: completing socks on double circulars, including some toes w/o “donkey ears.”

  45. Proud: beaded eyelet *cardigan* (chicago, rowan 37) that looks crisp and fun
    Sorry: Sleeveless mohair sweater (eek) itchy, hot, awful-looking stitches

  46. Prouds? Number one would have to be the Rhinebeck sweater. A fine upstanding aran knit in a decent unpretentious Canadian wool and executed flawlessly, quickly and most surprisingly…predictably. That like…never happens.
    Sorries? Mercy. It boggles the mind, there are so many they are like the stars in the sky. Many, bright and burning on…..
    Tell you what though. It’s always gauge.
    Drinkie poo? Red wine (Yellow tail) for the prouds…Screech (no ice, straight up) for the sorries.

  47. First of all, when did Cascade become DK? I thought it’s worsted?
    I think a cardi with some lace and/or cables would be lovely in Cascade.
    Margaritas, ice, lots of salt please :)
    Prouds: My beaded Kiri shawl, my Vittadini Shaped Top, my soon to be blogged about Shaped Triangle Shawl in Euroflax Linen (hi Kay!!!) and my Daffodil Entrelac socks.
    Sorries: My one and only foray into colorwork over 20 years ago, my only UFO ever! My first sweater after returning to knitting after a 15 year hiatus…I have no LYS so wandered into JoAnn’s and purchased Lion Brand Chenille Quick and Thick…oh the humanity!! That *crap* shed everywhere and twisted on itself so unmercifully after struggling thru the back of the cardi, I packed it in a box and mailed it back to Lion Brand demanding a refund – which I got :)

  48. Proud: It must have been the mint green elephant I knitted for my daughter while I was pregnant with her. In those days, nobody knew if they were having a boy or a girl, so there was lots of mint green and pale yellow yarn available. I made the elephant from the yarn leftover from a sweater and hat I had made for her while watching Elizabeth Zimmermann on TV. I stuffed the elephant with old stockings. So what we ended up with, folks, was an elephant who was so weak in the knees he couldn’t stand up and whose tan-taupe-brown insides could be seen between the stitches. Oh how she loved that elephant! For years! Why is it a proud? Because she talked about it this year — lovingly and laughingly. I have lots of other things I’ve knitted that I’m happy with, but the memory of the elephant — and the way my daughter talks about it — warms my heart the most.
    Sorry: A tote bag I made for my sister. She threw it out. Ouch. Okay, it wasn’t knitted; I sewed it. But it was truly a work of art. She could have at least kept it in a closet and gotten it out when I came to visit. Lesson learned: Be thoughtful about who you make things for.
    I’ll be thrilled if we make a cardigan.
    And I’d like a Marguerita, please, no ice. Yes, salt.
    Sandra

  49. Prouds: blankets/throws/shawls/sweaters for children
    Sorries: sweaters for myself
    I really love the heathered Cascade 220s – I’ve never seen a tweed though – I am curious! Annhb

  50. Proud: Shapely Tank in Crystal Palace Waikiki….not on the list ….don’t want to shake up the mix. Forget I mentioned this fabulous yarn.
    UGH: Tank from Yarn Girls guide….not shapely for moi
    DRINK: My sweet husband’s COSMO – ummmmm it’s calling me now!
    ps – at future search in the UMC we NEVER get to drink! (at least not on church grounds) this is the BEST FUTURE SEARCH PROCESS YET!

  51. Proud: my Ribbon x Back – that was done in a completely different yarn than called for which required lots and lots of math – and it came out FANTASTIC
    Sorry: my poor Cozy – frogged who knows how many times and still a UFO.

  52. Sorry:I knitted a school sweater for a friend circa 1960. It took weeks (she was tall) and was an unmitigated disaster. It did teach me that knitting on commission wasn’t for me, though.
    Proud: A ‘magic ball’ (yay!) modular knit waistcoat (vest) in colours I love.
    I second the call for a cardigan.

  53. Forgot the drink. Tiny glass of sloe gin. This caused my MIL to say ‘I don’t know what you gave me but I’m floating’.

  54. Proud – Socks with Lorna Laces Flame – Made them for my very quiet demure hubby (he picked the yarn)
    Sorry – Sweater for hubby from green Lions brand wool ease – it still isn’t done
    Fav Drink – My hubby’s elderberry wine

  55. Sorries: Baby sweater for a friend’s baby girl, it was my first and the neck almost didn’t fit. I believe she wore it for a pic and that was it.
    Prouds: The cable knit afghan I submitted to the local and then state fair early in my knitting career won blue both times:D
    Drink: Fuzzy Navel (summer knitting), Irish Coffee or hot buttered rum (winter knitting).

  56. Actually, being relatively new at this, I am most proud when I acquire a new skill–the first time I did short-row shaping or knitting a lace pattern or my first pair of socks (which I just finished last night, coinkidinkly). I love the rush of knitting hubris I experience when I conquer something that seemed so difficult before I tried it.
    Most of my disappointments have been with yarn selection. I had a bit of an obsession with R2 Paper when it came out–somehow, I just liked the idea of it–and I must have started 5 or 6 different projects, only to abandon them, one after the other, when they didn’t live up to my expectations. Yet, someday, I’ll find the perfect project for R2 Paper!

  57. Thank goodness someone in this room thinks like me. I’m all worried about having the yarn before the pattern. This smacks of STASH doesnt it?
    Prouds: This summers purse b/c I finally picked some colors that more than just work together, and it was a stash buster no less!
    Sorries: The someone who also thinks we ought to have pattern before yarn, reminded me I too have a shapeless cotton tank.
    Drink nomination: COKE, with caffeine with sugar. Cannot possible knit while tipsy. Make enough errors without etoh. But I’ll certainly drink while I wear whatever it is we are knitting with cascade 220.

  58. I can’t believe I’ve missed out on the voting! Must check bloglines more regularly…
    Proud: Every heel I’ve ever turned. I really love that moment.
    Sorry: My Softwist version of Debbie Bliss’s Lara. I’ll pay better attention to the sizing on the next one.
    Drink: Absolut Cosmopolitan.

  59. Prouds: my extremely fuzzy bolero that is supposed to tres fashionable but I wear it while cooking breakfast for kids, the little Starmore lion sweater for my son, a Kaffe for my husband, the blue kangaroo (and the chenille panda), the amazing colorwork mittens lined in angora (sadly given to a thankless recipient).
    Sorries: everything that didn’t fit AT ALL and was given away as soon as it was finished (several entries), the Summer Tweed tank that got tossed as soon as it was finished (bleh), the lovely cobalt merino cabled masterpiece that languished so long it became a moth hive and got dumped (with needles) into the trash chute.
    Drink: Tanqueray 10 + (diet) tonic. Lime, of course.

  60. Best: DNA scarf that was loved by the recipient (and his coworkers…he worked on the genome project). Go With the Flow Socks that won 1st prize at the fair. Bella poncho (in laceweight) that I just finished. And the Felted Bucket Hat & Cabled Scarf set (made from the winning Cascade 220!) for my friend.
    Worst: Hat for my brother that came out too stretchy (didn’t knit it on small enough needles…will be redoing before the cold weather hits!)

  61. My suggestion: Rowan, #30 “Erin”. Why? It works with Cascade 220 (I have proof), so that made it top of mind. Beyond that: Sweaters are highly practical garments. It’s slightly fitted so odds are that it might be a bit more flattering than a box. There are cables! But not too many! So boredom may be averted.
    Oops: reading through comments I note this wasn’t necessarily a whistlestop on a campaign trail. At any rate, among the Prouds would be the sweater named above, and basically anything that has turned out wearable outside the home. The Sorrys? Oy, so many. Mostly the result of either bad yarn substitutions or picking patterns badly. THis is all fun. Thanks!

  62. Drinks first, because We Must Have Priorities. Frozen Margarita, with plenty of salt. Why? Because, that’s why. And it abbreviates to Rita. So there.
    Prouds: Rogue. What a wonderfully well-written pattern. And lovely to boot.
    Bed and Breakfast Pullover from IK. A beautiful fit. Can you tell I enjoy cables?
    And another proud would be socks. Any socks. Socks are wonderful. But socks in Cascade 220? I’d need to move to Montana. Not that that’s a *bad* thing.
    Sorrys: Anything drop-shoulder. That bump in the front of the armpit is just so unlovely. There’s a Classic Elite drop shoulder cardigan that I can’t even force myself to do the buttonhole band on. Already frogged it once to make it a modified drop shoulder. Maybe I’ll frog it again. Another drop shoulder pullover with lovely cables, but that darn bump. Sits in the closet unloved and unworn.
    I would love to see us do a cardigan. Something that would be suitable in the workplace, with a little waist shaping and nice detailing. Like Eris. http://www.girlfromauntie.com/patterns/shop/eris/detail.php
    Is Cascade 220 too heavy for that?

  63. OK, I know I’m getting my comment in under the wire here. First things first. I’d like to nominate the Manhattan as the Official Beverage. We’re heading into the Cold Months now and a nice, stiff Manhattan is definitely a cold weather drink. Caveat: don’t even try to knit after one of these.
    Prouds…hmmm. Upon consideration, my Proudest knit project was my First Sweater. I knit this oh, at least a dozen years ago and I’m still wearing it (wore it yesterday, in fact). I was gifted with a lot of Pingouin cotton, so I went out and found a pattern that I liked (openwork, almost lacy) without realizing that it was probably too darn hard for me. I just went ahead and knitted it anyway, even rigging up my own graphs so I could maintain the pattern while making the sleeve increases. It’s biased a little over time, but holding up well. Even now, I’m still asked if I really, really made it myself.
    My biggest Sorry? That’s easy. Ages ago, I bought some pretty, rose-colored Crystal Palace Chenille to make the Crystal Palace Cotton Chenille Textured Sweatshirt (http://www.straw.com/cpy/patterns/cpy9602.html). Why sorry? Well, No Swatching Occurred. Thing could have been body armor. Wrist cuffs too small for my then-preschooler. You get the idea. It sat around for years, front, back, and single tiny sleeve until I gleefully frogged the thing a year or so ago. Ha!
    Let’s do a cardigan! The earlier commenter who mentioned their versatility is right. Though I myself voted for Rowan Wool Cotton, I promise I’ll knit up our perfect project in Cascade 220.

  64. Prouds: Smoulder from Rowan 31. Fits perfectly. Sold me on the raglan sleeve forever. Who wouldn’t look good in a raglan sleeve? I get compliments and one time a stranger asked me if it was a Kaffe Fassett sweater. I purely beamed.
    Sorries: Deco, also from Rowan 31. Not sorry I knitted it, since my moaning about it caused Ann to start chatting at me on the Rowan website. But sorry that I can’t seem to finish it right since it’s such a beautiful thing in the photograph. Another Sorry is Creeper from Denim People. They should not call that a ‘shallow set in sleeve’–in fact it’s a drop sleeve by another name, and by any name it makes me look like a box.
    I think we have some consensus in the room about a cardigan. (I also think the choice of yarn is eliminating items like socks and shawls.) Fine by me; I’m not sayin’, I’m just sayin’. Will we come up with a non-wool to sub for the Cascade 220, for the Allergy Prone? Onward! xox Kay

  65. Lets see, lots of prouds this year:scarf from dyed-and-handspun, my Silk Garden shawl that I wear all the time even though I thought it would be ugly when I started it, and the beautiful Lamb’s Pride cardi I sort of design and made for my mom last Christmas.
    Sorrys: dumb, expensive scarf for my friend (bad yarn&pattern combo); the Euroflax worsted weight pullover w/bell sleeves from IK (I can’t imagine how much washing it will take to make that thing wearable–and it still won’t look good on any human); and a 1/2 finished cardi in Lion cotton/acrylic blend (it wasn’t really that cheap, and I think I re-sized the pattern all wrong).
    I vote for a cardigan; so versatile.
    And by the way, I look HORRIBLE in raglans–my shoulders already slope, I need the return of shoulder pads to wear raglans. Drink: Skim latte, the real thing, no sweetener–iced in the summer, hot the rest of the time.

  66. Prouds: MinnowKnits Orangini Ruffled Vest I added a cotton skirt to it that made a really darling dress for my neice’s 2nd Birthday. I used the cotton stria called for in a lovely shade of light pink.
    Sorries: to many to count but I learned from them all so it is not all bad

  67. Prouds : Like Stephy above, I am proudest when I learn new things in my knitting but if I had to pick one it would be the Manly Sweater from SnB I knit for my husband. Fits him like a dream, looks really great on him too. Mostly I am proud of it because I had Finisher’s Anxiety over it for more than 6 months and once I got over the anxiety it came out great!
    Close behind would be my first lace shawl, a small Flower Basket, the poncho I made for my little sister and all of my handknit socks.
    Sorries : A garter stitch shawl I made in Koigu(perhaps blocking would help), my first baby sweater that has twisted stitches in it because I was knitting through the back loops for months before I realized it (One of the hazards of teaching yourself to knit), an attempt at a poncho made with Homespun, garter stitch knit flat mittens that look like oven mitts.
    Drink : Gin & tonics w/lime

  68. I know, I know…. I’m late to the party (as ever) but I wasn’t at work yesterday so no surfing. Yup it’s true, I do all my surfing at work. But I do work too. Honest.
    So, if you’re in a good mood and decide to consider my prouds and sorries then here they are:
    Proud – has to be Birch in Koigu. I made it for a friend’s birthday last year and it was (almost) completely perfect. She was SO happy. I was amazed! I mean, LACE!
    Sorries – Hhhhmmm… lots of these but the two standouts are from the 80s (in my first knitting life). One was a boxy cotton sweater from Vogue magazine. Lovely cotton, beautiful colour, shame about my total, complete and utter lack of understanding of the concept of gauge. And especially the idea of attempting to keep it the same throughout the garment. Result – a fantastically loose part just over my left breast. Nice.
    Sorries (part two) was a short red batwing sweater. Pattern was from Pingoin I think. Lessons learned; gauge (again), sizing (waaay to short is not a necesarily a good look) and that general one of ‘just because you love the pattern doesn’t mean that it’ll suit you’.
    I have been thinking that I’m older and wiser and have learnt those lessons but have just realised that I rarely knit anything for myself. At least nothing that is in any way fitted, um, well, like a sweater…

  69. Blimey, forgot the drinks. Gin and Tonic please!

  70. Proud: purple felted Cascasde 220 monster
    Sorry: felted Cascade 220 fedora – yowch.
    Drink: whiskey. It’s the cascade of the liquor world – a tremendously versatile workhorse of a beverage.