For the look of Relax in a worsted weight yarn, take a look at Worsted Boxy.

Cloudy Sunday

Dear Kay,
Sunday is just about the best thing there is, don’t you think? I’ve been watching stuff pop up around the house.
1. Popovers
popovers1.jpg
The most fun you can have with flour, milk, eggs, and salt.
Here’s a recipe that is just about the same as the New York Times Cookbook recipe I used. There are all these superfussy recipes, what with the warm-up-the-cream-not-milk, the use-a-cast-iron-pan, don’t-use-all-purpose-flour business. To me, the magic is using four plain ingredients which result in a freaked-out hollow puffy balloon of chewy goodness. Amaze your friends!
2. Sweet Peas
My sister Buffy sent me sweet peas for Christmas, in infant form, so I’m raising them up. They popped up two days ago.
Yesterday:
sweetpea1.jpg
This morning;
sweetpea2.jpg
Wrist Warmers
After the undignified snatching of my needles at the London airport, I returned to Nashville having discovered that people on airplanes sometimes do things other than knit.
Like, watch movies. Have you heard about this idea? Who knew? I watched Little Miss Sunshine (featuring an excellent dysfunctional family) and The Queen. (I gotta pause for a moment to ponder Helen Mirren’s portrayal of Queen Elizabeth II.)
But watching movies can in no way be considered knitting, so when I finally got home I had an ache like a phantom limb–an itch to knit a tube, yet no longer the owner of tiny, dangerous sock needles.
The smallest needles I have at home are size 3. A great needle, if you ask me–one of the finest sizes. I started off wishing for some loungey socks to wear around the house, but that quickly went by the wayside once I dug up the yarn I wanted to use: Rowan’s Yorkshire Tweed DK, in the shade with the uncharacteristically perky name of Cheer.
yorkshiretweed.jpg
Cheerful, but with a little gloom, don’t you think?
Now, a person could make socks with this yarn, but even I have my limits when it comes to knitting tweedy yarns. How much misery do I really want to inflict on my feet?
I shifted to the next best thing to do in the round, on a size 3 needle: wrist warmers.
I am so late to the wrist warmer phenomenon that it feels positively RETRO to be making them. Everybody else has a drawerful of wrist warmers, fingerless gloves, convertible flap/mitten/semi-fingered hand coverings. Hell, some people are so sick of fingerless gloves that they’re knitting fingers on them. When I Googled “wrist warmers,” guess who came up first:
Bonne Marie and her classic, often-imitated but never surpassed recipe for Voodoo Wrist Warmers, which appeared in the second issue of Knitty. That was in 2002, people. The thing was distributed on, like, a floppy disk or something. I’m amazed my computer can even access something from 2002.
wristwarmer.jpg
A tube with a buttonhole for the thumb. It doesn’t get more elemental than that. And my wrist? So very warmed. It’s like voodoo or something. Thank you, Bonne Marie, for satisfying my tube-knitting jones.
Love,
Ann

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31 Comments

31 Comments

  1. I’m not much into wrist warmers, it’s my fingers that always get cold, so I never understood the use of them. I do however like the ideas of popovers with just four ingredients. I love the little sweet peas. I hope the weather they keep telling us is going to show up (you remember winter…) doesn’t do damage to them. Keep us updated.

  2. What happened to you needles at the airport? I flew Fla. to London and back in Oct. and hauled mine all over ( incl. on the plane). I’m flying New Orleans to Calif. at the end of this month and had big plans for all those flying hours. Is is not ok to take needles now?

  3. The wristwarmers look fantastic. I like the morbid cheer. I may have to knit some up today just so I can continue knitting other things – the heater just went out and we have “Artic Blast 2007″ working it’s way through Austin as we speak. It’s ALMOST freezing!

  4. I just saw Little Miss Sunshine, and it was also on a plane! Laughed and/or cringed the whole way through. The song “Superfreak” has a whole new meaning for me now.
    Coolest thing about wristwarmers? You can knit with them on!

  5. Due to an inability to just say no to a beeyoutifull tin of tiny needles made in India, I have extra size 1 and 2 DPNs. Shall I send them to you?

  6. I love the wrist warmers but here in Michigan it gets too cold for unprotected fingers. When I went in search of a glove pattern for sock yarn I could not find one. So I did what all knitters do, create my own. I kind of compiled about 4 different tipless patterns and then put tips on the fingers. I L-U-V love them!!!!! Trekking xxl rocks!!

  7. Maybe next we’ll be knitting just fingers. I posted something about your airport incident. Reminded me of you. You may get a little chuckle out of it. :)
    http://www.knit-and-run.blogspot.com

  8. I watched both Little Miss Sunshine and The Queen on the plane, too. Both excellent (although very different) movies.

  9. Love wristwarmers. They are great for these reasons: 1.Instant knitting gratification – you can do them so quickly and use up stash effectively. 2. I delude myself into thinking I am very hip when wearing them and 3. They actually work – keep you warm – sometimes I wear them in the house while knitting.

  10. I like the label Retro, like that clapotis I’ve been meaning to knit. The next one to call up will be ‘mid-century.’ I have to settle down to knit and watch Little Miss Sunshine, maybe tonight.

  11. I always feel too cramped to knit so I bring a book. But those wristwarmers look like they’d chase away the gloom of a winter’s day. Very lovely.
    And thank you for the recipes!

  12. I’m so sorry to hear about your needles being confiscated and to be without knitting on a transatlantic flight!?!?!?! I can’t even imagine. It’s good that you put your knitting fever to good use. Those Voodoo wristwarmers look oh-so-warm!!

  13. My hands were cold while typing this weekend so I just cast on for my first pair of fingerless mitts. When the cold wind blows [around one's desk], great minds think alike.

  14. Wristwarmers/fingerless mitts are really quite amazing. I continue to be surprised at just how warm they keep my hands on those in between days…too cold for nothing, too warm for mittens.
    Yummy popovers! They are one of my all-time favorite treat myself brunches. I bake up a whole batch, butter them all and then devour them all.

  15. Wristwarmers/fingerless mitts are really quite amazing. I continue to be surprised at just how warm they keep my hands on those in between days…too cold for nothing, too warm for mittens.
    Yummy popovers! They are one of my all-time favorite treat myself brunches. I bake up a whole batch, butter them all and then devour them all.

  16. My love for Yorkshire Tweed 4-ply knows no bounds…since I’ve been told it’s being discontinued and replaced, I’ve been stashing it away like a sqirrel preparing for winter. I acquired the bulk of my collection the last time I was in London — luckily, when I flew in and out I asked at the check-in desk and was told it was better not to risk trying to take knitting needles on the flight, so I did not experience that particular heartbreaking loss.
    When I worked at an LYS, my advice to knitters making travel plans was always “if you must knit and are worried about losing needles, bring two pencils and something that knits up on a US size 8.” Basically, confiscation of needles is at the discretion of the security personnel — and while flying within the US it’s usually ok, it’s often not on international flights. One more thing we need to fix when knitters rule the world!

  17. Ooo, your wrist warmers look perfect! I’m making some next, with some green wool I’m spinning. Warmy voodoo goodness! Thanks for the tip!

  18. hahaha…love it…

  19. Hey, Do you have a good pattern for a teapot cozy? I need one desperately.
    Lori

  20. Thanks for the idea. I too missed the fingerless boat (maybe because I wasn’t knitting in 2002). At first I thought they would be impractical, as I usually want my fingers covered, but lately I see how they would be useful. I have yearned for a pair whilst trying to fix outside Christmas decorations, and taking outside pictures, and driving – so I’ll be starting some soon. And if they are just a tube, they should knit up lots faster than fiddling around with individual fingers. Easy knitting = TV knitting. What could be better on a snowy afternoon (off work today) up here in the north? Nothing, I say.

  21. “popovers” are yorkshire pudding here in the UK – served with rare roast beef and gravy made from pan juices … yummy!
    Fiona

  22. I have totally missed the wristwarmer craze too, but those are great, and I love that yarn. I have some I bought for a halter top, but now I’m not sure….

  23. I used Saturday to knit a pair of Shetlend wool wrist warmers/mitts/fingerless gloves for my daughter who has Raynaud’s Disease and does have to be out in the cold occasionally at work. If her hands stay warm, her fingers don’t turn white and stay that way for hours. I am going to do some in alpaca for her and for my charity boxes.

  24. Wristwarmers 1) keep you warmer than you might expect…you loose LOTS of heat through your wrists (like wearing a hat keeps your body warmer) 2) keep you warmer than you’d be otherwise when you NEED your fingers out, even if you’d prefer mittens 3) are nice indoors when typing, knitting and such. They don’t work well for cooking!
    They are also nice as an extra layer UNDER mittens or gloves!
    I like them for driving…all the grip power of bare hands, much of the warmth of mittens, and I can leave them on indefinately, while I pull the mittens off quickly!

  25. Now I’m hungry for popovers!

  26. Do they confiscate bamboo needles too? I thought they wouldn’t show up on the xray, I knit socks on needles that look like cocktail sticks!

  27. I suppose I’m late to the wristwarmer craze too. I haven’t made any yet but I just recently started wanting to make some.

  28. Thanks for reminding me that I knit me some Voodoo[s] in Jan-Feb ’03! Now that the 70-degree days have rightly left us, I need to find those things!

  29. We love to make popovers using The Joy of Cooking, mostly because it calls them “high, hollow, crusty beauties,” and we like to repeat that.
    I keep meaning to do the garter stitch wrist warmers in Weekend knitting. Maybe this wilil be my motivator.

  30. We love to make popovers using The Joy of Cooking, mostly because it calls them “high, hollow, crusty beauties,” and we like to repeat that.
    I keep meaning to do the garter stitch wrist warmers in Weekend knitting. Maybe this wilil be my motivator.

  31. Oooh, you need to knit Fetching next – my favorite wrist warmers! (Knitty – Summer 2006 – it’s the cover pattern). They’d be yummy in that tweed!