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Flood Avoidance Tips and a Haiku

Dear Kay,
A rainy day here, the first since May 2, a date that will go down in infamy as The Day That Really Fracked Up Nashville. Everybody’s dodging raindrops, all jumpy. I’ve checked my gutters about eight times today. You’d think I had some kind of water allergy.
Sleeping Bag Queen Heather and I spent a good long while today chasing down $8.94 sleeping bags and $3 travel pillows for kids. Such an excellent penny pincher Heather is–when you’re trying to make the most of money that people have donated, it’s amazing how cheap you can become. This hunt for bedding was a maddeningly inefficient thing to do–there is a warehouse somewhere stuffed with these things. But sometimes you have to move fast. Project Sleeping Bag will be finished tomorrow when Heather fires up the truck and takes it all over to the families.
There are longer-term efforts in the works to help these folks, which I’m so glad to see. Immediate needs are one thing, but a real plan is what really matters. For Nashvillians interested in helping out with the Millwood Manor apartments (see previous entry), please contact me. I’ll put you in touch with the people coordinating this project.
Our NPR affiliate did a good piece on Millwood Manor here.
OK, here’s a donation haiku for you today:
Give give give give give
Bucks bucks bucks bucks and more bucks
Easy greasy: here
Love,
Ann
PS Flood Avoidance Tip of the Day: These are not words you want to see in the name of your street, neighborhood, or subdivision: Creek, River, Water, Riverside, Bend, Ford, or Opryland. You want to look for Hill, Heights, Mountain, Hillside, Mountainside, or Arizona.

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21 Comments

21 Comments

  1. I’m happy to see you have reached the gallows humor stage -

  2. I made DH look up the topo maps…we are more than twice as high as 3 times the record floods. Of course, we live in a place labeled “Hills”.
    But, well, there are places I could not move to, no matter how unlikely they are to flood.

  3. But what should you do if it’s “Riverside Heights?”
    In all serious, you are doing good work. Well done.

  4. Arizona is not a good address if you are Latino or look Latino, just sayin’. Keep dry!

  5. Drove through N’Ville today. Miz Judd seems to have all or most of her buffalo back. And as a United Methodist, we are very proud of our clean-up buckets. Take care!

  6. Another word you don’t want to see: “falls” (as in Little Falls, New Jersey (which is a small town also sent “under water” some weeks back…)

  7. My town is named Bend, should I be worried?

  8. “Mill” is maybe not a good word either, not unless it was a wind mill that was once there.

  9. Just so you know, I flew over Nashville the other day on a trip back from Arizona and the Continental pilot made a special announcement to folks that if they looked down they could see the Cumberland River still overflowing its banks. He gently reminded us that whatever our worries, we should take time to give a thought about the folks down there.

  10. Just so you know, I flew over Nashville the other day on a trip back from Arizona and the Continental pilot made a special announcement to folks that if they looked down they could see the Cumberland River still overflowing its banks. He gently reminded us that whatever our worries, we should take time to give a thought about the folks down there.

  11. Our hearts and thoughts are with the victims of this terrible disaster.

  12. Dig in Your Pocket
    For sleeping bags and pillows
    You’ve got plenty yarn
    Oh–it’s not a haiku contest? Sorreee my bad!
    Finally hi-rise apartments are getting the respect they deserve.
    xox Kay

  13. Ann,
    I would like the contact for Millwood Manor
    Thanks

  14. Ann,
    I would like the contact for Millwood Manor
    Thanks

  15. I live in Forrest Crossing and the thing that Forrest (as in Nathan Bedford) crossed was the Harpeth River. The neighborhood beside us is called Riverview and they had a great view of the river at their back doors. Luckily the golf course between the river and our two neighborhoods was able to handle all of the overflow so no flooding for us. As I drive through downtown Franklin to take my children to school, you can see a brown line marking the flood level, on yards, trees, cemeteries, buildings and homes.
    I just got an email from a friend with a great video putting it all together. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pFjaQoOdJvI

  16. Ann,
    Arizona isn’t necessarily the place to be to stay dry and safe. I live about a mile north of the Salt River (which is normally just a dry riverbed). We had a great deal of snow this year in the mountains (near Flagstaff) and since January we’ve had two roads washed out, two water rescues (including the infamous horse chronicled here: http://www.equinechronicle.com/tag/salt-river-project) and a drowning just last week of a neighbor’s child less than 1/2 mile from our home.

  17. Uh-oh. That’s all I can say today. It’s raining, alot, and my neighborhood is called Swan CREEK. . .

  18. My neighborhood has Woods in its name. Whenever the wind blows hard, trees fall on the power lines and short us out.
    Everybody’s got something I guess.
    Thinking of y’all!

  19. I live in *Minneapolis* and am a little creeped out by our ongoing rain and parking-lot puddles, having spent May 2 watching the river approach my sister’s house in Ashland City. Thanks for publicizing what you’re doing – and for doing it in the first place.

  20. Living on a penninsula made of reclaimed swamp land near the ocean gives me constant concern for flooding, no matter what lofty names they stick on our roads. One tropical storm and we’re scuba divin’, honey.
    Do I detect a secret Gallactica fan with that “frackin” up there? :)

  21. I think your haiku is beautiful in its simplicity. Just like a classic haiku (though not about cherry blossoms drift…)