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Per Orla Dishcloth

I give you the unusual, and so far underknitted, Per Orla, a pear-shaped dishrag tribute to Orla Kiely, and my humble offering to Dishrag Nation.
perorlablog.jpg

Per Orla Dishcloth
By Kay Gardiner of www.masondixonknitting.com
Inspiration always comes from what we love, but it can take a while for an inspiration to percolate into a knittable project. I am a superfan of Orla Kiely’s graphic designs for handbags, accessories, and housewares. To me she’s the perfect mix of retro and right now.
This dishcloth tribute to Orla Kiely may be a bit fancy to live in the kitchen sink (and I will confess that it bothers me a little if a dishcloth can’t be folded neatly), but it has enough style and substance to bring to the dining table as a hot pad or trivet. Most of all, it’s a fun little puzzle to take the familiar Ballband Dishcloth stitch pattern, shape it into a pear, and finish it off with applied i-cord. The leaf and stem are more than a whimsical detail; they are a sneaky way to avoid having to graft the 2 ends of i-cord together where they meet. (You start the i-cord with the stem, and end it with the leaf.)
Yarn: Peaches & Creme worsted weight, 100% cotton, 2½ oz (71.5g), 122 yds (112m), 1 ball each in solid colors A, B and C.
Size 7 (4.5mm) straight needles
Size 7 (4.5mm) double pointed needles (2) for i-cord trim (optional)

NOTE
The ballband stitch pattern is a 12-row repeat that creates alternating sections of reverse stockinette “bricks”, each brick separated from its neighbor by an elongated slipped stitch.
To shape the pear, the instructions require you to work increases and decreases on the edges of the work while keeping the stitch pattern consistent. There are 2 tricks to doing this. First, the first or last stitch of a row is never a slipped stitch. Knit that stitch even if that alters the stitch pattern on the edges. Second, to easily remember where you should slip the first stitch on a new section of “bricks”, look at the section of bricks below, and remember that the slipped stitch in a brick in the section below should be the 3rd stitch (the center stitch) of each brick in the new section. (When you are working the pattern, read this again, and it will make more sense; if you are a Ballband Dishcloth veteran, you already get it, so cast on, already.)
BALLBAND STITCH PATTERN
Row 1 (RS) Using A, knit.
Row 2 Purl.
Row 3 Using B, k4, slip 1 stitch purlwise, *k5, slip 1 purlwise; repeat from *to last 4 stitches, k4.
Row 4 Knit 4, yarn forward (yf), slip 1 purlwise, yarn back (yb), *k5, yf, slip 1 purlwise, yb; repeat from * to last 4 stitches, k4.
Row 5 Purl 4, yb, slip 1 purlwise, yf, *p5, yb, slip 1 purlwise, yf; repeat from * to last 4 stitches, p4.
Row 6 Repeat row 4.
(Rows 1-6 form the first section of bricks.)
Row 7 Using A, knit.
Row 8 Purl.
Row 9 Using B, k1, slip 1 purlwise, *k5, slip 1 purlwise; repeat from * to last stitch, k1.
Row 10: Knit 1, yf, slip 1 purlwise, yb, *k5, yf, slip 1 purlwise, yb; repeat from * to last stitch, k1.
Row 11: Purl 1, yb, slip 1 purlwise, yf, *p5, yb, slip 1 purlwise, yf; repeat from * to last stitch, p1.
Row 12: Repeat row 10.
(Rows 7-12 form the second section of bricks.)
INSTRUCTIONS FOR DISHCLOTH
Using A, cast on 27 stitches.
Work rows 1-4 of the ballband stitch pattern.
Row 5 Increase one stitch in the first and last stitch of the row. (29 sts)
Row 6 Work row 6 of the ballband stitch pattern as set, incorporating the increased stitches (in this case, knit 5 stitches at the beginning and end of the row instead of 4).
Row 7 Increase one stitch in the first and last stitch of the row. (31 sts)
Row 8 Work row 8 of the ballband stitch pattern as set, incorporating the increased stitches (in this case, knit 6 stitches at the beginning and end of the row instead of 4).
Row 9 Knit 3, slip 1 stitch purlwise, *K5, sl 1 stitch purlwise; repeat from * to last 3 stitches, k3.
Row 10 Work row 10 of the ballband stitch pattern as set.
Row 11 Increase one stitch in the first and last stitch of the row. (33 sts)
Row 12 Work row 8 of the ballband stitch pattern as set, incorporating the increased stitches (in this case, knit 3 stitches at the beginning and end of the row instead of 1).
Work the 12-row repeat once again, increasing 2 stitches on the 3rd, 7th and 11th rows as set. (39 sts)
Work the 12-row repeat once again, with no increases or decreases.
Work the 12-row repeat three more times, decreasing 1 stitch in the first and last stitch of the 3rd, 7th and 11th rows. (21 sts)
Work rows 1-6 of the repeat with no shaping.
Decrease 1 stitch in the first and last stitch of the next 3 rows. (15 sts)
Work 3 rows with no shaping, thus completing another 12-row repeat.
Next row (RS) Using A, knit, decreasing 1 stitch in the first and last stitch of the row. (13 sts)
Next row Purl, decreasing 1 stitch in the first and last stitch of the row. (11 sts)
Bind off all stitches.

APPLIED I-CORD TRIM WITH STEM AND LEAF DETAIL

STEM
Using double-pointed needles and C, cast on 4 stitches.
Knit 1 row. The 4 stitches are now on the right needle. Slide the stitches to the other end of the needle, and place this needle in your left hand. Now knit another row. The working yarn will seem to be at the “wrong” end of the row when you start, but knit your row anyway. Repeat this process until you have a magical little tube of stitches, approximately 12 rows long.
APPLIED I-CORD TRIM
Now, with the needle containing a just-finished row of stitches, pick up a stitch in the middle of the bound off row of stitches at the top of the pear. Slide the stitches, including the picked up stitch, to the other end of the needle (more accurately, you are sliding the needle through the stitches). Now, knit 3, knit the last stitch of the i-cord together with the picked up stitch from the pear.
Repeat this process until you have applied i-cord edging all the way around the pear. If you are not experienced at working applied i-cord, play with it a little until it looks right, but work enough rows to see the i-cord edging emerging before you pull it out and start over. The key to a tidy finish on the RS is to work that knit-2-together with the picked-up stitch UNDER (or BEHIND), the i-cord stitch. The working needle goes first through the i-cord stitch, and then through the picked-up stitch. If the needle goes up through the picked-up stitch before the i-cord stitch, the contrasting color of the picked-up stitch will show through and it will look twisty and messy. (O, the horror.) It is worth a little fiddling, and then once you’ve got it worked out, all will be smooth as i-cord.

LEAF
When you have worked the i-cord edging all the way back to the stem (taking care to pick up that last stitch of the pear, work another row of i-cord (no longer attached to the pear), knitting the last 2 stitches together. Now you have a 3-stitch tube of i-cord started.
Work 4 rows of 3-stitch i-cord. From now on, work back and forth instead of i-cord (in the round).
Row 1 (RS) Knit 1, yarn over (yo), k1, yo, k1. (5 sts)
Row 2 (WS) Knit 2, p1, k2. (Notice that what you are doing is working the leaf in garter stitch, but with a center stitch in stockinette. The center stitch will always be purled on the WS.)
Row 3 Knit 2, yo, k1, yo, k2. (7 sts)
Row 4 Knit 3, p1, k3.
Row 5 Knit 3, yo, k1, yo, k3. (9 sts)
Row 6 Knit 4, p1, k4.
Row 7 Knit 4, yo, k1, yo, k4. (11 sts)
Row 8 Knit 5, p1, k5.
Row 9 Knit 2 together, knit to the last 2 stitches, k2tog. (9 sts)
Row 10 Knit 4, p1, k4.
Row 11 Knit 2 together, knit to the last 2 stitches, k2tog. (7 sts)
Row 12 Knit 3, p1, k3.
Row 13 Knit 2 together, knit to the last 2 stitches, k2tog. (5 sts)
Row 14 Knit 2, p1, k2.
Row 15 Knit 2 together, knit to the last 2 stitches, k2tog (3sts.)
Row 16 Knit 1, p1, k1,
Row 17 Slip 1, k2tog, pass slipped stitch over. Fasten off remaining stitch. You have a leaf.
Finishing: Weave in all ends. When you weave in the tail of the yarn through the stem, take a stitch or 2 at the base of the stem and leaf to keep them connected neatly at the top of the pear.

Nobody Puts Baby In The Corner
plum.jpg

Don’t forget about Per Orla’s little sis, Plum Orla. No pattern for her, but if you’ve made the pear, you’ll suss it out pretty easily.
Happy weekend, everybody!
Love,
Kay

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