Ask Patty: Gapping and Mapping

August 5, 2019

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25 Comments
  • Thanks so much! This should resolve my frustrations with short-rows heels in socks. I can’t wait to try.

    • I adore Japanese knitting patterns! Especially for my math challenged brain, seeing those maps does away with all that verbage (a word that is uncannily confused with garbage), and the picture becomes crystal clear. Thanks for bringing this out!

  • Love these tips!

    • Fantastic! Thank you!

      • I love the idea of using a map instead of written directions. But in looking at your map, Patty, I would only bind off the shoulder stitches three times. That’s the way the map looks to me. Three arrows pointing to the number 4. What am I missing?

        • It’s actually BO 4 st at the beginning of the next 6 rows (I had originally had a typo and said the beginning of the next 4 rows instead of 6). You can only BO at the start of a row. When you are working two sides at once in sweaters, with two balls of yarn, one row is working until the end of the needle. Think about two sides of that sweater of those sweater stitches on a single needle. One row would be working across both sides until you turn your work.

  • Great instructions. When I see “At the same time” I get nervous. Thank you!

  • You.Are.Brilliant.

  • Genius! And it makes sense—better than magic.

  • Thank you for solving the ‘how to fix the gap’ that results with W&T short rows on sock heels. I’m venturing into sock knitting for the first time and just completed first short row heel—with a sense of satisfaction except for the resulting gap. Now I can tackle that little gap issue with a great solution! Very timely post for me today!

  • Excellent!

  • No longer will I reject a pattern because of the words “short rows”. You have put me in command now….thanks Patty!

  • Thank you so much! My current project involves wrapping and turning and this should help. But because things can never be spelled out too clearly for me, can you clarify this statement:

    2. Now do an SSK with the wrap and the next stitch, slipping only the first stitch as if to knit.

    –Does this mean you slip the second stitch as if to purl?

    Here’s a question which could cause controversy. I’ve been googling wrap and turn videos and there seems to be a 50-50 split in opinions as to whether you slip the stitch before moving the yarn to the front (slip stitch, move yarn, slip stitch back, move yarn back) or move the yarn to the front and then slip. Any thoughts?

    • Think about the WHY of an SSK. What is it? You slip two stitches as if to knit so you turn them around with their leading leg in the back so you can knit them together through the back loop. We often do a move like an SSK without thinking about what it actually is. So, if we do an SSK by only slipping the first stitch, that simply means we only turn the first stitch mount around, then simply put it back on the left needle and knit 2 together through the back loop.

      As for the second question, that has to do with how you hide the wrap. I prefer moving the stitch first then the yarn, because it leaves the wrap like a stitch lying on it’s side with the leading leg on the top. Much easier to hide . . . but that might have to be a column :)/

      • Yes, PLEASE!!!!!

  • After I finish the short row heel from Wanderlust, I pick up a stitch on each side of the sole and then knit those end stitches together on the next round – to avoid a gap there. Is there a way to do this better? I’m not sure it helps much or at all.

    • I think I was taught the same thing.

    • What I just wrote in the column is what I do to avoid a gap. Just what I do. Not the only way, just my way.

      • I like your way better. To me it seems more elegant and actually addresses the issue i stead of being a work-around that requires remembering extra steps of picking up 2 extra sts and then remembering they need to be worked into one stitch later. The less I need to remember, the better!

  • For the wrap and turn, your picture doesn’t show the lifted stitch sitting to the left of the stitch. Then when you say only slip the first stitch as if to knit, what do you do with the second stitch? I’m sorry, your pink stitch pictures turned out kind of blurry. You actually said, “Now do an SSK with the wrap and the next stitch, slipping only the first stitch as if to knit.” Can you explain a little further, or say it a different way? Thanks!!

    • Think about the WHY of an SSK. What is it? You slip two stitches as if to knit so you turn them around with their leading leg in the back so you can knit them together through the back loop. We often do a move like an SSK without thinking about what it actually is. So, if we do an SSK by only slipping the first stitch, that simply means we only turn the first stitch mount around, then simply put it back on the left needle and knit 2 together through the back loop.

  • Every tip sooo helpful! Thank you! This may get me to try a short row heel again. Tho I think bust darts might even be more likely.

  • This is so helpful! I was getting so frustrated with the elongated stitches on that sweater that I stuffed it in a bag and hid it in my closet. Now I know what to do, it’s going back on the needles as soon as it’s not 112 degrees anymore 🙂

  • I love the reversion from words to pictures… Reading is overrated. (if we are adulting they are ‘diagrams’) As far as ‘keeping track’… I know there are tricks and tips. But my dear friend created ‘Knitlinx’ for row counting. Is anybody else using these?? https://www.knitlinx.com/