The Garments of Logalong

By Kay Gardiner
January 22, 2018
Flat or three-dimensional, log cabin knitting is big fun.

Leave a Comment

24 Comments
  • Love love love the ingenuity of all you Knitters! Rite On!

  • Fascinating to watch these coming together (with the blankets too).. I am with you in hoping you find drape and not swamp.

  • So check out Ann Weaver’s Rothko series.

  • Wow. Wow! WOW!

  • These are so damn good, thrilling to see, can’t wait for the finish shots. Kay, the monochromatic grey drapey sweater takes it to another level.

  • I’ve been so inspired by all the knitters who are venturing into log-cabin garment territory. So many fantastic ideas! Might have to join in, especially after seeing this cute top from 2015: https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/victoria-top
    Would be perfect for Spring/Summer

    • Oooh, Victoria looks very do-able, and pretty quick in worsted weight! No Sleeve Island, either. May have to play with that. The wish list grows ever longer…

  • I’m in with a garment too Kay. Please look for @elenicekraemer. I thought it was a very good idea at first. Now I am not so sure. I’ve been having so many new ideas while knitting… no time to try them all…

  • I have been dreaming of a garment much like Diane’s as I knit away at my blanket squares. I am excited to see a real life rendering of what I have been imagining!

  • Oh, man, these are all so cool & INSPIRING!

  • I never thought about the different “takes” on “did you make that?” and have now a bit anxiously rewound my mental tape on a little community event last Sunday where I zeroed right in on a woman wearing a cobalt blue, densely-cabled cardi. Relieved to say I opened with, “Did you make your sweater it is beautiful I love it!” so even though she didn’t knit it herself, she knew it was a compliment and was happy to share it’s provenance – Ireland! – and it’s wardrobe status: very warm, often worn, and much enjoyed 🙂
    An old friend at the same gathering was wearing a handknit (by herself) vest that – upon (ahem) questioning – turned out to have been made from yarn (spun by herself) made from the fleece of a sheep raised by another woman at the same gathering.
    NB: this was NOT a fiber-related event.

    • Although I love all the garments, this comment was my takeaway from today’s post too. I definitely have mixed feelings when asked this by non-knitters vs. knitters.

  • You are going to love your sweater. I’d wear the Rodarte but using only one color gives your sweater a certain French tone. I’m presently knitting a sweater that has vered away from my swatch gauge. I too am hoping that I’m not wearing a tent, when finished.

  • Do not give up on Team Monochrome! I spent my whole (brief) time log-cabining pining for some nice grey. On grey. On more grey.

    That sounds like sarcasm, and yet it is not.

  • I so love watching these sweaters come together. 🙂

  • Inspiring! Thank you for sharing these. Could it be that my neglected sock yarn stash is destined to become a log cabin garment? I hope so.

  • I am on team monochrome garment but with a very different construction. It seems to be working ok, but time will tell…

  • The projects look great, so exciting. Found the Mason Dixon Knitting book at the library today. 2006 log cabin blankets and a bathmat. Didn’t join this knit a long, but very inspired!

  • I‘ve long imagined that this pattern
    https://www.ravelry.com/projects/sms/klaralund
    could be log cabinified…

  • Not being the designing type myself, I find the creation of these garments thrilling. Each one is a fun, lovely surprise. Look what you have inspired!

  • I’m right with you in your review of the first two sweaters. Not doing it for me. But your sweater! The sophisticated combination of logs and luxe. I like yours best of all.

  • Am especially excited by the circle skirt! Ms. Konerman-Sease indicates on Instagram: *If you’re wondering what kind of sorcery this is, all is explained on my blog (follow my bio link)*

    Okay, I’m too stupid for words, or at least for Instagram, but no matter what I clicked, I couldn’t find any information about how the triangle blocks are constructed. Nor could I find her bio link. I think I can tell the method by looking, but I’d love to read any details.

    Thank you in advance for your help!

  • Love all the creativity and innovation, and it’s inspired me to try a log cabin pullover design. Thank you!